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SUMMARY OF COEFFICIENT OF EXPANSION 

FOR COMMON GLASSES AND METALS

(with melting points for common metals)

All figures times 10 (-7)

Glass information

Metals information

Type of Glass Coefficient of expansion

Bullseye tested compatible

(Also Uroboros 90)

90

Effetre (Moretti) sheets and rods

(some variation; should test)

104

Spectrum System 96

(also Uroboros 96)

96
Borosilicate (Pyrex) 32.5

Window (float) glass

(Also includes most bottles) 

83 to 87 (depends on manufacturer)

May be even higher or lower

Source:  Manufacturer's data

 

Type of metal Coefficient of Expansion Melting point (°F) Melting point (°C)
Aluminum 248 1218 659
Brass, navy 212 1650 900
Copper 176 1981 1081
Gold 140 1945 1061
Iron, cast 108 2300 1260
Lead 295 621 328
Silver 191 1764 962
Steel, high carbon 121 2500 1374
Steel, stainless 171 2600-2750 1430-1507
Tin 398 788 415

Note:  These are for pure metals.  Alloys can vary widely.  I have seen other sources with slightly different COEs, but most are close to these figures.  (And besides, they're close enough for government work.)

Source:  U.S. Military Training Circular No. 9-237, "Welding Theory and Application."

For a technical discussion of the thermal expansion calculation for glass, go here:  http://glassproperties.com/expansion/ExpansionMeasurement.htm