Choosing a wet tile saw - WarmGlass.com

Choosing a wet tile saw

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Bonnie Rubinstein
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Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Dec 21, 2017 10:55 am

Hi All, I want to purchase a tile saw.. I do not cut super thick pieces like pattern bars, but maximum 1/2" thick glass. Does anyone have recommendations for an affordable dependable tile saw, and size of blade and hp?
Many thanks!
Bonnie
Bonnie Rubinstein

Brad Walker
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Brad Walker » Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:42 am

If at all possible, get a 10" blade, rather than a smaller one. You want a model with the blade above a table that slides back and forth, not one with a 6" or 7" blade below a surface that doesn't move. Even though you may not need the extra height, the larger 10"blades will cut better, be safer, and last longer. Make sure you get a blade specifically for glass, rather than one made for cutting tile.

I used to recommend the Harbor Freight 10" tile saw as an inexpensive 10" saw, but they've redesigned it lately and I don't believe it's as good as the older one I have. Generally Harbor Freight will sell the saw for a little over $200 on sale, plus another $60 or so for a stand. That's a great price (less than half most competitive similarly sized saws), but I can't in good faith recommend the new design since I haven't tried it. Perhaps someone else has some experience with it or with any brands that are less expensive than the MK, which is a solid piece of equipment but pretty expensive.

Bonnie Rubinstein
Posts: 138
Joined: Sun May 04, 2003 9:04 pm
Location: River Falls, WI

Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:04 pm

Thanks, Brad.
In reading reviews, I am also alittle wary of the HF saw.
I called MK and found out I can buy a reconditioned saw, and may opt to do that. Just as an FYI- Lowe's carries some MK at reasonable prices.
Do you have thoughts on what hp I would need, and what other attributes I should look for?
Thanks!
Bonnie Rubinstein

Bonnie Rubinstein
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Location: River Falls, WI

Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:18 pm

In talking with MK, they say that a 7" blade should work fine for my needs, and that makes the affordable options much broader. So, does anyone have additional thoughts on 7" vs 10"?
Bonnie Rubinstein

Marty
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Marty » Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:28 pm

Your needs may change- get the 10".

Bonnie Rubinstein
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:47 pm

This is true. Glass is a continuous world of new discoveries. I will bite the bullet; go with the 10”. Am wondering if there are options other than MK. From all I read, it appears to be a great saw. But wonder about others(?) thank you.
Bonnie Rubinstein

Dick
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Dick » Thu Dec 21, 2017 3:21 pm

always get the largest you can as needs change. if you are going to keep for a long time, I recommend a bridge or rail saw. They have the work staying stationary and the blade on top moving. The problem with standard tile saws is that all the water runs down on the platform and wheels that slide under the blade. That will wear on the parts, and then you have a bouncy or uneven push through the blade. I spent more and went with a Raimondi made in Italy. They do so much more, and if you plan to use a saw a good amount it is worth it. I have now upgraded to a 14" blade

Bonnie Rubinstein
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Location: River Falls, WI

Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Dec 21, 2017 3:48 pm

Thankyou- yes, I will look for a moving blade as well.
Bonnie Rubinstein

Marty
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Marty » Thu Dec 21, 2017 6:12 pm

How much cutting of what sizes will you be doing? The bridge saw is not meant for or good for cutting small pieces- I'd get the regular sliding table 10" first. MK is reliable, the $300 Chinese copies are decent. If you can get a good used MK it's a great start; spend your money on the blade. Look for a smoothly rolling table that tracks true to the blade. The height adjustment for the blade must be easy to adjust and the pump should put out lots of water- it's easier to lessen the spray than increase it (you could add another aquarium pump).
Bonnie- can you get to other studios to try out saws?

If you do feel like treating yourself, Rodia also makes a lovely saw (it was a toss up between that and the Raimondi for my 4' bridge saw).

Bonnie Rubinstein
Posts: 138
Joined: Sun May 04, 2003 9:04 pm
Location: River Falls, WI

Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Dec 21, 2017 8:29 pm

Hi Marty- I will be cutting pot melts, and various other pieces of 1/4" thick glass. Not big pieces, but I may want to trim some longer pieces at some point, as well. I think as I use it, I will get more ideas of how else to use it.The sliding blade will suffice. I will be buying a good diamond blade.
I am really not in touch with other local glass artists that have a good saw. That is why I am gathering information.. to make the best informed decision and go for it. Thanks for your input, all.
Bonnie
Bonnie Rubinstein

jim burchett
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby jim burchett » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:03 pm

I had a 7" MK but I sold it and bought a 10" from Harbour Freight..it's about $220,,,I added a thin piece of acrylic to the top of the table and then cut a Kerr through, as the area on the table was a bit wide for thin cuts. It has worked great with a good blade and an added waterline, both from HIS .
"No, you cant scare Me, I'm sticking to the UNION. I'm stickin to the UNION till the day I die" Woody Guthrie

Bonnie Rubinstein
Posts: 138
Joined: Sun May 04, 2003 9:04 pm
Location: River Falls, WI

Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Bonnie Rubinstein » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:18 pm

Hi Jim, I did also buy the 10" from Harbor Freight- we have not set it up yet. I am not clear on what 'cutting a Kerr' is. And did you need a second water line? Thanks for clarification.
Bonnie Rubinstein

Marty
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby Marty » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:41 pm

Kerf. The width of the cut.

jim burchett
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Re: Choosing a wet tile saw

Postby jim burchett » Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:04 pm

Spell check...right. what Marty said. I found that the water outlets on the saw were insufficient. I just put a splitter on the line and added a movable line that I can direct at the cut, strapped on the saw with wire-ties, it cuts beautifully with the added water. I am more than satisfied by the value given by this saw.
"No, you cant scare Me, I'm sticking to the UNION. I'm stickin to the UNION till the day I die" Woody Guthrie


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