More large-scale architectural kilnforming - WarmGlass.com

More large-scale architectural kilnforming

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

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Lani McGregor
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More large-scale architectural kilnforming

Postby Lani McGregor » Sun Jun 08, 2003 11:45 am

The exhibition of kilnformed architectural screens at the Bullseye Connection Gallery is finally totally installed with the remaining full images online.

I think that some fanatics in our community might enjoy seeing just how BIG and (only seemingly) simple kiln glass can be: Allied Works is the firm that just won the commission to do the new American Craft Museum (now Museum of Arts and Design). Their screen (“Quiet Noiseâ€

Amy on Salt Spring
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Postby Amy on Salt Spring » Sun Jun 08, 2003 11:56 am

Incredible. Is there any chance you could make it so when you click on the photo you get a larger version of the picture? I wish I could see more detail! Amazing.
Amy

Lani McGregor
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Postby Lani McGregor » Sun Jun 08, 2003 12:11 pm

Amy on Salt Spring wrote:Incredible. Is there any chance you could make it so when you click on the photo you get a larger version of the picture? I wish I could see more detail! Amazing.
Amy


Hi Amy, I'll talk to the webmaster tomorrow about this. I'm sure it's possible. In the meantime we are in the 11th hour of a catalog on the project - 150 color images.... more detail than you probably need!

One of the funniest details to me - yoo hoo, Marty! - is of Suenn Ho's panels. She so loved the bubbles in the interior that she wanted them to rise up through the surface! Because Ray Ahlgren doesn't fabricate glass with that particular "problem" they ended up tack-fusing small blobs to the surface to give the appearance of the "surfacing bubble"!!!

One man's (or woman's) meat and all that .... that's what is so great about working with people outside glass.... all the stuff we kill ourselves trying to correct - they think is awesome!

-Lani

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Sun Jun 08, 2003 9:35 pm

Lani

Cool project. Without your explanation, I wouldn't have picked up the details from the picture.

The most impressive slumps I have seen (in person) are Italian furniture makers. They make radical cuts with a CNC diamond router, polish out the edges and then slump the various cutouts in to complex shapes with no mold marks. I'd love to be able to play around with those guys.

Hey Lani

On Friday I tried to get some tech help at BE but didn't quite get through to the right folks. I have a client who wants a 10' diameter 3' deep domed skylight that is water proof. The idea is to create a curved IG unit. The inside glass has to be laminated. I am trying to figure out if it would be feasible to laminate BE to float or BE to BE. I was hoping to be able to drop off flat glass to a factory and have them bend, laminate, and make the IG unit. One catch is that they want to laminate with PVB in an autoclave.

I haven't yet figured out how much my client will spend or how elaborate a look he wants. He started out to look in to a stained glass window, but they told him that it couldn't be sealed to the weather. I know that I can do some sort of art glass that comes out sealed.

I keep lookig for the client who will pay me to do a BE project, but economics have kept it all float so far.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
http://www.customartglass.com
Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware
Architectural Commissions

Brian and Jenny Blanthorn
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Postby Brian and Jenny Blanthorn » Mon Jun 09, 2003 4:23 am

Lani McGregor wrote:
Amy on Salt Spring wrote:Incredible. Is there any chance you could make it so when you click on the photo you get a larger version of the picture? I wish I could see more detail! Amazing.
Amy


Hi Amy, I'll talk to the webmaster tomorrow about this. I'm sure it's possible. In the meantime we are in the 11th hour of a catalog on the project - 150 color images.... more detail than you probably need!


-Lani


Yo Lani

It is possible we got 3 pics for each pic last one full screan size n our budget in not quite as large as BE

I am a big pic fan

While ur at it some detailed shots as well please

I liked the bubble story

I am secretly a big bubble fan

But is difficult 2 make em look good

Say hello 2 Pete

:sheep:
Image

charlie
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Postby charlie » Tue Jun 24, 2003 5:24 pm

Bert Weiss wrote:I haven't yet figured out how much my client will spend or how elaborate a look he wants. He started out to look in to a stained glass window, but they told him that it couldn't be sealed to the weather. I know that I can do some sort of art glass that comes out sealed.


that'd be news to a lot of state capital dome and churches, as a lot of them have stained glass domes in them open to the weather.

Paul Tarlow
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Re: More large-scale architectural kilnforming

Postby Paul Tarlow » Tue Jun 24, 2003 6:21 pm

Lani McGregor wrote:PLUS it's laminated, meaning that the fabricator – Ray Ahlgren – had to slump two identical panels within tolerances tight enough to allow an even fill of the laminate.


ooooh - let's play the "how would you do that" game!

You could slump the first piece -- then make a mold from it to use as a form for slumping the piece that fits.

Other ideas?

- Paul

Glenda Kronke
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Postby Glenda Kronke » Tue Jun 24, 2003 7:27 pm

Paul,

I think I would slump the two pieces of glass (one stacked on top of another with a seperator between them) at the same time, thus insuring they are an exact fit.

I think one piece would have to be slightly larger than the other so that the edges matched up when slumped (if that was important in the design).

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Jun 24, 2003 8:31 pm

Glenda Kronke wrote:Paul,

I think I would slump the two pieces of glass (one stacked on top of another with a seperator between them) at the same time, thus insuring they are an exact fit.

I think one piece would have to be slightly larger than the other so that the edges matched up when slumped (if that was important in the design).


That is how it is done. You use double sided tape that is .030 0r .060, so you need to sift that thickness of alumina or talc between the sheets. You can use paper if the bend it not too radical and would tear the paper. After the glass is slumped and cleaned, you set it up with the tape to seal and set the thickness. Then you can run a bead of silicone all around to insure the seal, leaving a fill hole and a breathe hole on one side. Then you pour the epoxy resin in and fill up the space between the sheets. This is really tricky. It requires clamps and a tilt table and a few special tools. If you seal it right and set it up right and get all the resin in with no bubbles and clamp it right, the resin cures and you have laminated glass. Every step of that process wants to screw up and the result is usually a big smelly sticky puddle of resin on the floor.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

Doug
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Postby Doug » Tue Jun 24, 2003 8:42 pm

Lani..nice talking with you today...finally! hahah The architectual show was just awsome. The images on the site could never do them justice as there is much moreclose up detail then is possible to photograph. Well, maybe one could, but it would take a lot of images to capture all that detail. Ray, George and the R&E staff did a good job putting the architects vision together. The standing architectul sculpture by Susan Emmons almost took my breath away, the play of color, using the different sized frit grains was so amazing. Of course I was drawn to it by the color first as the 1859 is one of my favorites. ..Overall an excellent show!


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