Felisatti question - Page 2 - WarmGlass.com

Felisatti question

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Claudia Whitten
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 9:32 pm
Location: Idaho
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Postby Claudia Whitten » Sun Mar 16, 2003 12:19 pm

Amy,
How are you using water with this? I quess what I am asking is this is a electrial grinder with no water feed of its own. How do you contain the water, if it flies all over like Tony suggested?
I am just having a mental block on visualizing this.....Claudia

charlie holden
Posts: 260
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2003 8:26 pm
Location: Atlanta

Postby charlie holden » Sun Mar 16, 2003 12:26 pm

I agree with Brian that anyone looking at grinders should check out His Glassworks site. They sell all kinds of grinding and polishing equipment, and offer advice and support for glass workers as opposed to stone. Often the guys at the stone supply houses don't have a clue about glass, though their prices may be a little lower.

Bob at His has been grinding and polishing his own glass for years and will talk to you on the phone or by email about your specific needs. He will also give you tips on process and problem solving. Look at their faq too. He posts regularly over at Craftweb and is one of their sponsors.

If you want to look at another stone tool supply place, with stores in Atlanta and Denver and maybe a few other places, look at Gran Quartz:

http://www.granquartz.com

Brian and Jenny Blanthorn wrote:
His sell this sort of stuff and more

A very good site just 2 look n FAQ ( support ) is full of good stuff

http://www.hisglassworks.com/index.html

Amy Schleif-Mohr
Posts: 280
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:18 pm
Location: Milwaukee

Postby Amy Schleif-Mohr » Sun Mar 16, 2003 1:30 pm

Claudia, it has a water feed.

I actually haven't used mine yet, hopfully next week.

Phil and Doug can shed better light on this.

Amy

Doug
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Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 2:13 pm
Location: Beautiful, sunny Portland Oregon

Postby Doug » Sun Mar 16, 2003 2:13 pm

It has a water hose type hook up and I use it in a contained enviorment such as one of those large shallow plastic tubs. It really doesn't "Throw" water all over as suggested previously but it does eminate water through the center feed of the pad which can be controlled by a valve at the ginder. I would wear a plastic apron and boots when operating it though. As far as the comments about buying products from HIS glassworks, Robert carries an excellent line of equipment and has supplies that others sometimes dont seem to have, BUT sometimes I cant see spending lots more money on items just because they are carried at a "glass" supplier. The granite, marble and stone polishing industry makes vary viable products that the glass industry has started aquiring and using in recent years. To say that the reason to buy from a "glass equipment supplier" just because they know about grinding glass should not be a determining factor for purchaseing. Thats why we have this board, so people can freely share their knowledge about working with these products. Even if they do come from another side of the industry. My apoligies to Mr Stephen from HIS glass who does a wonderful job of supplying great products and the best service along with sharing his vast knowledge of information. But there are less expensive alternitives on the market and this equipment is just as good (if not exactly the same) as the equipment sold at higher prices in the glass industry.

Tony Smith
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Postby Tony Smith » Sun Mar 16, 2003 8:22 pm

I would argue the point with Doug that the unit "really doesn't "Throw" water all over as suggested previously". I wear an apron and use a mortar tub because it does throw, spray, squirt, spin (pick a verb) water due to the rotation of the pad and the fact that the water is spraying through the spindle. The mortar tub does a good job containing the water, but I still occasionally get a water spray up the wall of my studio. There is sufficient spray that I cover other electrical items with plastic while I'm grinding.

The grinder that I have is an MK Diamond 1503S http://www.mytoolstore.com/mk/1503s.html and it has a water feed through the spindle. The unit can be used without the water feed in a shallow tub of water as well. As long as the water is covering the glass, it will work fine.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Doug
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Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 2:13 pm
Location: Beautiful, sunny Portland Oregon

Postby Doug » Sun Mar 16, 2003 10:04 pm

Point taken Tony. When a person is new to using a water feed angle grinder it will tend to throw water everywhere until the user becomes proficient enough to control both the water flow and the usage of the machine. But, by all means, it is a wet grinder and should be used in a contained area or out of doors.

Tony Smith
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Postby Tony Smith » Sun Mar 16, 2003 11:06 pm

Agreed.

So, are you saying I should turn the water down??? :lol:

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Patricia O'Neill
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:24 pm
Location: Arizona

Postby Patricia O'Neill » Mon Mar 17, 2003 1:20 pm

Form the different links that were posted, I have noticed that this wet grinder is available in two versions: electric and pneumatic.

So, I am going to ask the dummy-tool-challenged question: what would be the advantage of a pneumatic over an electric?

Is the pneumatic more secure than the electric with all the water splashing around? Is is more powerfull? is it more comfortable?

Thank you!
Patricia

charlie
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:08 pm

Postby charlie » Mon Mar 17, 2003 1:25 pm

Patricia O'Neill wrote:Form the different links that were posted, I have noticed that this wet grinder is available in two versions: electric and pneumatic.

So, I am going to ask the dummy-tool-challenged question: what would be the advantage of a pneumatic over an electric?

Is the pneumatic more secure than the electric with all the water splashing around? Is is more powerfull? is it more comfortable?

Thank you!
Patricia


air tools are always lighter. they don't have a big honking motor attached to them. the 'motor' is your compressor, located elsewhere.

they don't have electrical hazards, which, because of sparking, allows them to be used in places where explosions could occur.

they require less frequent maintenance, have fewer working parts, and in general, are almost always better to use than motor powered devices. however you frequently need a great big compressor for a lot of them.

Patricia O'Neill
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:24 pm
Location: Arizona

Postby Patricia O'Neill » Mon Mar 17, 2003 3:38 pm

Thank you Charlie for this information. I understand that, if I have a good compressor, pneumatic tools are attractive.

What's about vibration?
Due to a previous surgery to my hands, I can't use tools like hand drills because of the vibrations. I've always been reluctant with hand tools because of that, but this wet grinder/polisher is so.... tempting.
I would think, because there is no engine, that pneumatic tools are less vibrating than electric tools. What do you think?

Thank you.
Patricia

charlie
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:08 pm

Postby charlie » Mon Mar 17, 2003 3:45 pm

Patricia O'Neill wrote:Thank you Charlie for this information. I understand that, if I have a good compressor, pneumatic tools are attractive.

What's about vibration?
Due to a previous surgery to my hands, I can't use tools like hand drills because of the vibrations. I've always been reluctant with hand tools because of that, but this wet grinder/polisher is so.... tempting.
I would think, because there is no engine, that pneumatic tools are less vibrating than electric tools. What do you think?

Thank you.
Patricia


air tools almost always have less vibration, except for tools that are supposed to vibrate (sanders, etc).

your doc should have informed you about anti-vibration gloves. for example, http://www.metasco.com/workglv/antivib2.htm
there are lots of different ones. go to a good tool place. they are using in garages, woodworking, manufacturing of all kinds, etc.

you should be wearing these with any tool that moves, including household ones. not doing so can lead to a lot of bad things, including carpal tunnel and nerve damage.

Patricia O'Neill
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:24 pm
Location: Arizona

Postby Patricia O'Neill » Mon Mar 17, 2003 4:00 pm

Charlie, what a great information!!

I did not know about those gloves. This is the first time I hear about them and I've got to try them.

And sounds like I'm in for the pneumatic grinder ;)

Thank you again.
Patricia

Beth
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:51 pm

Postby Beth » Mon Mar 17, 2003 4:21 pm

Felisatti Granite City mystery solved. When I called back to order, Kent told me he wondered if those of you who were told Granite City doesn't carry the Felisatti WG20 called their Vermont location instead of Minnesota.

Vermont used to carry it but no longer does. The two locations operate independently with different websites. Minnesota's is http://www.granitecity.com and the number is (800) 328-7094. Kent Brown has been helping me, incredibly nice.

:?: They carry several pad kits that get as high as 2000 or 3000. Two sets are 7 diamond pads from 50 to 3000 (one set a thicker pad), and one set is 6 pads from 50 to 2000 plus one "polisher" pad. They can't get an answer about what the polisher pad is made out of but suspect diamond powder combined with something else.

I'm looking to take the shine off the glass and then bring it up to "baby bottom soft" maybe without using finishing medium like aluminum oxide.

Any opinions about whether going up to 3000 is preferred? The 7 piece 50-3000 pad sets are $149 or $198 depending on thickness of the pad (diamonds are the same) and the 50-2000 with polishing pad is $140.

The 50-3000 are 50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1500, 3000. The other is 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000 & polisher.

(They have other sets that go 50-800 for people who are going to fire polish instead, or add polishing medium to the water.)

Beth

Doug
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 2:13 pm
Location: Beautiful, sunny Portland Oregon

Postby Doug » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:20 pm

Beth....you beat me to the punch. Just home from the shop with the pad information. I bought them from Granite city tool of Vt. and they are called:
4" diamond resin disks made by Pearl abrasive co.

It is a set consisting of 50-100-200-500-1000-2000-buff.

Not the very best pads Ive ever used, but excellent for the price.

Steph Mader
Posts: 58
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 1:45 am
Location: Freeland, WA
Contact:

web address

Postby Steph Mader » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:27 pm

Here you go:

granitecitytoolvt.com.


Thanks you guys, maybe they came in right after I called or something!
Steph

Amy Schleif-Mohr
Posts: 280
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:18 pm
Location: Milwaukee

Postby Amy Schleif-Mohr » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:33 pm

I just got my invoice and I paid$489.63

This is what I bought:
Grinder- $285
Backer Pad- $23.25
50 grit pad- $31
100 grit pad- $29
200 grit pad- $29
400 grit pad- $29
800 grit pad- $29

shipping and tax 23.32

Amy

Steph Mader
Posts: 58
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 1:45 am
Location: Freeland, WA
Contact:

Beth - website address for Minn?

Postby Steph Mader » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:33 pm

Hi Beth, thanks for the message. When I use granitecity.com, I get a city page for Granite City, Minnesota. Did I mess up somehow?

Steph

Amy Schleif-Mohr
Posts: 280
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:18 pm
Location: Milwaukee

Postby Amy Schleif-Mohr » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:36 pm

Steph,

Did you try http://www.granitecitytool.com ?

Amy

Beth
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:51 pm

Postby Beth » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:40 pm

Doug, thanks much - I'm on the right trail then. Do you actually use the buffing pad? Or a possibly slightly higher quality set that goes to 3,000 would be worth the extra $9.00. :?:

Steph, Granite City Vermont (granitecitytoolvt.com) used to carry the Felisatti but does not any more. Granite City Minnesota (granitecitytool.com) does. Same company but they work independently. See post two up from yours. :wink:

BTW, the grinder is $265 now.

Beth
Last edited by Beth on Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Amy Schleif-Mohr
Posts: 280
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:18 pm
Location: Milwaukee

Postby Amy Schleif-Mohr » Mon Mar 17, 2003 7:42 pm

Ooooo, it's on sale!


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