Another kiln question - Pottery kiln for Glass? - WarmGlass.com

Another kiln question - Pottery kiln for Glass?

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rosewyn
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Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 9:26 pm
Location: Toronto, ON

Another kiln question - Pottery kiln for Glass?

Postby rosewyn » Mon Jul 14, 2003 1:15 pm

Once again, I am very new to fusing and am currently involved in (what seems like) endless kiln research. I am sure there is an easy answer to this question, but I can't seem to figure it out. What is the difference between kilns made for glass and pottery? it is my understanding that the pottery kilns reach higher temperatures? Is that ture? If you purchase a pottery kiln can you use it for glass?

Thanks for your help, I have been reading all the past posts on this site and have learned so much for all of you!

Rosewyn

Claudia Whitten
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Re: Another kiln question - Pottery kiln for Glass?

Postby Claudia Whitten » Mon Jul 14, 2003 3:10 pm

rosewyn wrote:Once again, I am very new to fusing and am currently involved in (what seems like) endless kiln research. I am sure there is an easy answer to this question, but I can't seem to figure it out. What is the difference between kilns made for glass and pottery? it is my understanding that the pottery kilns reach higher temperatures? Is that ture? If you purchase a pottery kiln can you use it for glass?

Thanks for your help, I have been reading all the past posts on this site and have learned so much for all of you!

Rosewyn


Rosewyn,
Pottery kilns are deeper than glass kilns.They have elements on the side and firer higher. A glass kiln has elements on the lid and sometimes the sides also. Glass kilns will be made to fire usually to a max temp of 1700 or 1800 degrees. They are not as deep some are only 9"to 11". Yes you can fire with a pottery kiln, there are several of us on the board that do.
Welcome to the board......Claudia

Kaye
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Location: Camano Island, WA

Postby Kaye » Mon Jul 14, 2003 5:49 pm

After many months of lurking, I have to speak up because I'm in a similar situation--except that just last week I was *given* a Paragon X14J china painting kiln

http://www.paragonweb.com/catalog.cfm?t ... item_id=51

that belonged to the mother of a friend of a friend. My only experience is with a Quickfire I bought (used) about a year ago.

I'm told the kiln hasn't been fired in 10-12 years but it seems to be in good condition. It has only an on/off switch, but came with a pyrometer.

I'd appreciate any words of wisdom (or warning) about using this puppy for glass.

Barbara Cashman
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Location: Greensboro NC
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Postby Barbara Cashman » Mon Jul 14, 2003 6:59 pm

Kaye, you seem to have a neat little kiln. Remember, the lower voltage will mean a little more electricity on your bill and a somewhat slower fire. Other than that, you should be good to go, with a pyrometer. Play with it. I started my whole deal with an old Paragon enameling kiln. It's still being used. - Barbara

Dolores
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Postby Dolores » Mon Jul 14, 2003 9:43 pm

Greetings everyone! This is my first post being I am a lurker now converted to participant. The Paragon x14j is an extremely versatile little workhorse. This model was my very first kiln for porcelain painting, but I now also use it for annealing beads as well as glass fusing. All you need is a good ol' pyrometer to plug into the peephole and some durable kiln gloves and/or a lid hook to take a peek and flash vent. I do envy those of you who have the digtial programs, but I rather like the "hands on" feel a manual kiln requires (I also like making bread and cakes from scratch, so go figure!). Anyway, Rosewyn, you should do well with that hot little puppy. If you run into any difficulties, just call Paragon Industries for excellent customer service, tech info, and advice: 1-800-876-4328.
By the way, if you want a really, really, all purpose kiln try the AIM 64K or 88K. I've used mine to fire porcelain clay (2100 degrees!), fire painted china, anneal lampworked beads, and fuse most of my glass jewelry. Now... if it'll just do my taxes....

rosewyn
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Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 9:26 pm
Location: Toronto, ON

Postby rosewyn » Tue Jul 15, 2003 9:15 am

Thanks for the advice, one more question... Is there any advantage/disadvantage to having a deeper kiln?

Rosewyn

Dolores
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deep versus shallow kiln

Postby Dolores » Tue Jul 15, 2003 11:28 am

the greatest advantage to a shallow (4" to 8" deep) kiln is that you can stick your hands is there with tools to manipulate the glass more easily. You'd always wear kiln gloves to do this, although I have had one pair start smoking when I dallied too long. I often find myself manipulating glass when a pendant channel isn't closing properly on its own. I couldn't imagine diving into my 27" cress (unless I wish to be cremated, of course). One neat trick I've done in my x14j it to set a shelf up on stilts so my glass is only about 3" from the top opening. It sure makes things a whole lot easier.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Jul 15, 2003 12:02 pm

The differences between a pottery kiln and a glass kiln are depth and element placement. Using a glass kiln, you can heat up faster without breaking your glass. The deal is that heat radiates fairly evenly for about 12". For more info than you can digest, do an archive search under the term "evenivity"

My recommendation for adapting a pottery kiln to glass use is to add a controller. You can anneal 1/8" to about 1/4" without any special controls. If you plan to work any thicker than 1/4", annealing by the seat of your pants could prove tricky (not impossible, just tricky). We hate it when glass self destructs later in life.

Center de Verre, a board sponsor, can sell you a plug n play controller.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
http://www.customartglass.com
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NJ
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Joined: Thu May 22, 2003 12:28 pm
Location: Indiana

Postby NJ » Thu Jul 17, 2003 2:22 pm

Hi all - I have been lurking too. So glad this question got asked because I was trying to figure out how to ask the same thing too!! I, too , am looking for a kiln and have an opportunity to buy a new one, built special for me. The trouble is, the guy only makes ceramics kilns. I guess my question is - if a ceramics style kiln is built to be only 13 (23" dia.) or so inches deep, would that help overcome some of the disadvantages of not having the top element? I don't want to invest in this kiln and then have it not do what I need it to do. I too have been firing and slumping in an antique (really - 1941!!) enameling kiln. It does a good job - but it is soooooo small. Ready to grow!!


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