What do you use to cover your cutting table????? - WarmGlass.com

What do you use to cover your cutting table?????

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Dave Pascoe
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Location: Cornwall,UK
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What do you use to cover your cutting table?????

Postby Dave Pascoe » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:04 pm

Hi everyone,
Well,it`s happened! The time has come to move into my first workshop. I can`t tell you how exciting it is to be moving somewhere with enough space to swing a cat.
Also, excited and nervous about going full time into the glass. But I can`t wait to get started properly.

I`ve built a 2 sqm cutting table and I was wondering what you all recommened to use as covering?.I`ve been using cardboard until now, but I`d like something a bit better. There seem to be three options, Carpet, Cardboard, or that plastic mesh stuff ( obviously I haven`t a clue what it`s called!).

I`m leaning towards the carpet, but what do you think????
Thanks in advance,Dave.


P.S. I thought that maybe I could do a thread about the workshop set-up?[/list]

charlie
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Postby charlie » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:08 pm

my benchtop is 2 layers of 1/2" mdf. it's extremely smooth, easily brushed off, and as flat as can be if the under support is flat. when/if it gets marred up, i can just flip a board, giving me 4 surfaces before having to replace anything.

Phil Hoppes
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Location: Overgaard, AZ

Postby Phil Hoppes » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:19 pm

I use all three, carpet and just a clean MDF top and the plastic mesh. Carpet has the advantage for running scores on large cuts such as circles in that it has some give and lets you press to run the score. It has the disadvantage in that it is a pain to keep clean. Little glass shards can hide in the knap and cut you later on. I use a very low knap indoor/outdoor carpet on one cutting surface. The hard smooth clean cutting surface is best for most small cuttings as it supports the glass evenly so you can press hard without breaking the piece. You can't do that on carpet, in fact, carpet is bad for cutting smaller pieces for the reason just mentioned. Having areas with both surfaces gives me the best of both worlds. If you can afford the space, I would recommend both.

The plastic mesh is used on my morton system and is used to hold the guides. This is necessary for the guides and for small angle cutting on smaller pieces I find it works well but I would not want to use it for my main cutting surface.

Phil

Alecia Helton
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what do you use to cover your cutting surface?

Postby Alecia Helton » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:26 pm

The Morton Cutting System (the plastic mesh stuff) I wouldn't leave home without it.

Alecia
Alecia Helton
Wear Original Wonders!
Carrollton TX

Franci
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Postby Franci » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:30 pm

I don't know if its available in the UK but I use a product called homasote -it's about 3/8" thick, made from recycled paper. It's very durable but still can be cut w/ a utility knife. It can warp so I either screw it to my wood bench or clamp if it's a table I don't want holes in. Info available at http://www.homasote.com.

Dave Pascoe
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Postby Dave Pascoe » Mon Sep 15, 2003 8:00 pm

Thanks for the replys so soon,

Thanks phil,I have actually got another table that will just have a mdf top.I think I`ll carpet the main cutting table and use the other table for small stuff. The main table is big enough to use two sides for different types of work if I want to.I could always just put a piece of board on top if I needed to.

Kitty
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Postby Kitty » Mon Sep 15, 2003 8:37 pm

draftsman's linoleum, from Dick Blick.
comes in gray/white or green/white, various sizes.
i love it.
got a big piece of it on one of the kitchen counter where the Max grinder is, so the mess doesn't foul up the grout on the counter.

Jeanne
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What do you use to cover your cutting table?????

Postby Jeanne » Mon Sep 15, 2003 11:17 pm

I'm real high tech. I use large newspaper. About 4 or 5 sheets stacked for a little cushion. It's easy to get all the little shards quickly out of your way by picking up the front corners and dumping towards the middle. To clean the entire surface, pick up both sides, gently fold and funnel glass into the garbage.

Don Burt
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Postby Don Burt » Tue Sep 16, 2003 7:00 am

Kitty wrote:draftsman's linoleum, from Dick Blick.
comes in gray/white or green/white, various sizes.
i love it.
got a big piece of it on one of the kitchen counter where the Max grinder is, so the mess doesn't foul up the grout on the counter.


I have that draftsman linoleum on my painting table too. Good stuff.
For my cutting table/lightbox I use Alvin cutting matts. Not to be confused with or substituted by those cutting matts sold in fabric stores or Michaels. Alvin's are thicker and softer. I just spent some bucks and got two new translucent ones.

daffodildeb
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Location: Hot Springs Village, AR

Postby daffodildeb » Tue Sep 16, 2003 7:20 am

Sorry to ask a stupid question, but what is 1/2" mdf?
Deb

Marty
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Postby Marty » Tue Sep 16, 2003 7:30 am

I cut on an old hardwood door- no cushioning, sweeps clean. Masonite works too and is cheap.

Peg
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Location: Bristol, UK

Postby Peg » Tue Sep 16, 2003 7:43 am

I have one backlit plate glass work surface, and one with one of those green cutting mats (intended for cutting paper using a knife). It is pliable enough to 'give' a little to run scores, and has a very useful grid printed on it. You can get them at large stationary and office supply shops in the UK (not cheap though).

Alecia Helton
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Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 12:35 am
Location: outside of Dallas TX

what do you use to cover your cutting table???

Postby Alecia Helton » Tue Sep 16, 2003 9:57 am

Dave,

I started a topic a few days ago on Studio Design which I believe is the same thing as your Workshop set up would be. You might want to take a look at it. I've received a lot of good suggestions. And, I'm still looking for more.

Back to the Morton Cutting System, I was the one who said I cut on it. It is much more than a cutting surface. It allows you to easily cut straight lines and angles. I couldn't do without it. It is available on the web if you'd like to take a look at it.

Alecia
Alecia Helton

Wear Original Wonders!

Carrollton TX

Lia Howe
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Location: Haliburton, Ontario

Postby Lia Howe » Tue Sep 16, 2003 10:46 am

My main cutting table has carpet. It is that indoor/outdoor "woven" mat. It has no pile, just a cushioned surface. I use this table to make larger cuts, like cutting a piece off of my full sheet. To work on I use drywall, also called sheetrock. We renovated a 80 year old farmhouse so we had lots around. The paper surface takes all those little splinters and the "rock" gives support. I have lots of different sizes. I use it to glue on as well. I can glue then move the whole piece without worrying about the pieces shifting. I sometimes put waxpaper under my gluing to prevent any over glue sticking to the paper surface. My only warning about drywall is to CUT OFF THE TAPERED EDGE. You can really mess up your cutting if you go over this edge.LIA

Phil Hoppes
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Postby Phil Hoppes » Tue Sep 16, 2003 11:38 am

MDF stands for Medium Density Fiberboard. It typically comes in 4' x 8' sheets and 1/2" MDF is then 1/2" thick MDF. It is a type of engineered wood product that is different from partical board board in that the size of grain used to manufacture it is very small. If you look at partical board you can see that the size of grains used to make it are probably 1/16" to even 1/8" in size. I'm not real familiar with the process used to make MDF but I'm guessing they start with a slurry of sawdust and epoxy or binder and then press it into sheets. It makes a great table top as it is very flat. It does not do well with water as it absorbes it like a sponge an expands so you would not want to use it as a table top for your wet work or you would at least want
to cover it (that is what I do) with some waterproof material. It is quite heavy if you get it 1/2" or 3/4" which you should for a table top. It also makes a HUGE cloud of dust when you cut it so if you get some I would recommend going to your favorite hardware store (Lowe's, Home Depot) with the size you need and they will be happy to cut it down for you.

Phil

Peg
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Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2003 7:50 am
Location: Bristol, UK

Postby Peg » Tue Sep 16, 2003 12:41 pm

It also makes a HUGE cloud of dust when you cut it Phil


Make that a huge cloud of TOXIC dust. Wear a respirator if you cut it.

SAReed
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Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2003 5:01 pm
Location: NorCal

Postby SAReed » Tue Sep 16, 2003 1:35 pm

What is the purpose of cutting on a cushion? I've been cutting on my light table which is covered in thick tempered glass or I cut on my MDF table if I'm not using a pattern. What am I missing by not cutting on a cushion???

Confused as always....
Stacey

Phil Hoppes
Posts: 297
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 2:20 pm
Location: Overgaard, AZ

Postby Phil Hoppes » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:10 pm

For me actually cutting on a cushon only helps when you are cuttng large sheets, especially BE glass where the surface is not flat. The carpeted surface helps to even it out so when you push you are not over stressing some areas and being too light on others. Actually in cutting smaller pieces I don't like it as I tend to push a little harder on smaller pieces since I'm usually following a pattern. The harder pushing can cause the glass to crack or break in the wrong place when you cut on carpet or a cushioned surface. The cushioned surface is great for running a score such as when you cut a large circle.

Phil

PS - Other question .... what in MDF is toxic when you cut it? I know there is wood which is not unless you are alergic to the dust so is the binder toxic?

Hmmm answered my own question. For those interested here is a link to the msds on MDF. Thanks. Learn something new every day!

http://www.temple.com/msds/mdf.pdf

charlie
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:08 pm

Postby charlie » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:15 pm

daffodildeb wrote:Sorry to ask a stupid question, but what is 1/2" mdf?


termite barf (sawdust and very small wood particles) and glue. tmk, it's not toxic, but you will be snorting up brown snot for a long time if you cut it without protection. damhikt.

Siw
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:20 pm
Location: Norway

Postby Siw » Tue Sep 16, 2003 4:52 pm

Hi!

I use a black rubber mat on my working surface. "Sticks" enough for the glass not slipping away and soft enough to help the scoring a bit....
I easily get rid of dust & shards with a bit of damp cloth


Siw


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