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Thoughtful work?

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Catharine Newell
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resumes?

Postby Catharine Newell » Tue Sep 30, 2003 1:21 pm

Any takers on the resume questions?

Catharine

Gale aka artistefem
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Postby Gale aka artistefem » Tue Sep 30, 2003 3:18 pm

Sure - why not..........

“driven to commit artâ€
Last edited by Gale aka artistefem on Tue Sep 30, 2003 6:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Cynthia

Re: So, then, what about artist statements?

Postby Cynthia » Tue Sep 30, 2003 3:25 pm

Catharine Newell wrote: ... my next question logically involves artists statements. Do you have one? Does it get to the heart of your intent? Does it have clarity? Would you be willing to share? Are you interested in reading other statements from those of us on the board? Do you think that this is an appropriate forum for statement review?



I find your statement to be very accessible and informative Catharine, and one of the things I appreciate about it is that it tells me more about the work by giving me the opportunity to see it through your eyes. I can't connect with some statements, or find the common places between what is said and what I see in the work. When I read statements that seem to click and inform me about the artist and the work, that helps me to learn how to write a better statement. Thanks for sharing yours.

I don't know if this is the right place for a review of Statements. I feel that same way about critiques on forums as I stated in another thread. The choice to share and be open to comment is of course, up to each individual. So, with that said, I am open to comment, as I am confident in my statement knowing it can always be improved, and I'm comfortable with receiving input.

Here's my current Statement. It has to do with specific work (the vessels). I haven't got one for my 2-D pieces which come from a different place of intention or motive. Thanks for creating this thread. It's been very helful to listen to others, and to think about my own direction and focus. Hopefully I can generate better focus for myself and improve my work as a result.

Artists Statement

My love of glass goes all the way back to my days as a child playing with marbles. This fascination with glass and its potential to express whimsy, delight, surprise and pleasure informs my work. The pieces I create are collages, visual riddles of color and texture that always contain a surprise. I think of my work as a respite, an escape, a playful moment in which you might laugh and say, "Oh, look at that!"

Although formally trained in painting and drawing (I received my Bachelors of Fine Arts from the University of Utah), I was inspired by glass, because it is both sculptural and dynamic. My work has distinctive shapes and texture; it is also vibrant, active, and engaging in an evolving interplay of color and light.

Dynamic art comes from a dynamic process, and firing glass in a kiln is certainly complex and challenging. Creating a piece of kiln-formed glass is a delicate exercise in physics, chemistry, and art that continually places me on the edge of both success and failure. In an instant, the painstaking effort of cutting and assembling the elements of a piece can literally be shattered by the heat of the kiln. Conversely the work can emerge ready for the next firing or as a finished piece.

Given the capriciousness of the process, I view each work as an intimate expression of my love for glass. Ultimately, success is the creation of a work infused with my identity yet with a persona of its own. My hope is that my pieces invite you to want to get to know the work just as you might want to get to know me.

Jackie Beckman
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Postby Jackie Beckman » Tue Sep 30, 2003 7:33 pm

I also know fine & competant artists who have never "found" their voice. Partly because they don't understand what "a voice" is or how to go about developing this part of their artistic self.

It's helpful for aspiring artists to know that a voice can be developed (or achieved) and that it is not some unobtainable magic cloak that falls from the tree for some and not for others!


Gale, I still believe that even if an artist hasn't "found" their voice, it's only because they don't recognize it - not because it isn't there. I didn't mean to imply that it was " some unobtainable magic cloak that falls out of trees" and lands on special folks!! :lol:

When Cindy-Next-Door met Glenda a month or so ago, she looked at what Glenda felt was a mixture of experiments and found a common thread right away. I think it's common for someone to not see the best features in their own work or the commonalities that they need to build on, but they sure do know when it "clicks." It's internal and a gut feeling that can't be denied.

Jackie

Gale aka artistefem
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Postby Gale aka artistefem » Tue Sep 30, 2003 9:38 pm

"Gale, I still believe that even if an artist hasn't "found" their voice, it's only because they don't recognize it - not because it isn't there. I didn't mean to imply that it was " some unobtainable magic cloak that falls out of trees" and lands on special folks!!"

Jackie - LOL! You didn't imply this. It's simply my illustration that it is not a selective process. Finding, developing, having a visual voice is available to anyone.

We're in agreement that voice is inherently within each of us. Sometimes it's just needs a little extra sweet talking and coaxing to bring it out. I believe voice is not static - each of us are in different developmental stages of voice.

Peace...........my friend :D

ellen abbott
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Postby ellen abbott » Tue Sep 30, 2003 9:56 pm

I've been on vacation and out of town...

I do what I do (as far as motif and subject matter) because it makes me feel good to do it.

I didn't choose glass...it chose me. I explored painting, drawing, ceramics, weaving, textile design, sculpture (stone). Though I enjoyed all, none grabbed me the way an accidental encounter with glass did. None put me 'on the path' except glass. Don't know why, don't care.

Although I have made my living as an 'artist' for 30 years, I've never hung out with artists for the most part because I have felt that they are, for the most part, too impressed with themselves and their 'voice'.

I told a friend of mine recently, after viewing an exhibition of an artist's paintings, that I thought I would never be a great artist because I didn't have a message. That I was mainly concerned with reminding people how beautiful and necessary nature is. She disagreed with me. She thought that was a fine message.

Which made me think. And what I think is that the human race has gone insane as a result of it's divorce from and destruction of all other forms of life.

ellen

Gale aka artistefem
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Postby Gale aka artistefem » Wed Oct 01, 2003 6:49 am

Hi Ellen.........glad you're back. You always add good perspective to our WG conversations.

"Although I have made my living as an 'artist' for 30 years, I've never hung out with artists for the most part because I have felt that they are, for the most part, too impressed with themselves and their 'voice'."

I hope present company is excepted from this statement - LOL!

The beauty for me in being in the company of artists (or hole diggers or plant-tenders or children or......) is that I learn from all our differences.

Gale

Glenda Kronke
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Postby Glenda Kronke » Wed Oct 01, 2003 10:34 am

Gale aka artistefem wrote:"Gale, I still believe that even if an artist hasn't "found" their voice, it's only because they don't recognize it - not because it isn't there. I didn't mean to imply that it was " some unobtainable magic cloak that falls out of trees" and lands on special folks!!"

Jackie - LOL! You didn't imply this. It's simply my illustration that it is not a selective process. Finding, developing, having a visual voice is available to anyone.

We're in agreement that voice is inherently within each of us. Sometimes it's just needs a little extra sweet talking and coaxing to bring it out. I believe voice is not static - each of us are in different developmental stages of voice.

Peace...........my friend :D


First I want to say thank you to Catharine for her insightful advice and to Gale for her exercises! This is exactly what I was looking for. In reference to the statement above, sometimes there are people like me that need someone like Gale or Catharine or Cindy-next-door or Barbara or Jackie (and so many more on this board that are willing), to help us coax that voice out. I know the voice is within....as a matter of fact it is a screaming voice. I want to learn how to let it express itself.

I wish more classes were offered in this vein. I've heard that there are a few out there like Jack Doppler and Roger Thompson that offer courses like this (Bob L. has hinted at teaching along these lines). I believe that these types of courses are just as important as the technique courses. I would like to see more teachers exploring this route.

I picked up a book at a garage sale for 25 cents a while back. Theories of Modern Art. I was told by someone that went to RISD that it was their textbook way back when. I am finding the same thoughts expressed in this book by old masters as what is being expressed in this thread. It is a very enlightening read. Again, thanks everyone.

glenda

Catharine Newell
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Postby Catharine Newell » Wed Oct 01, 2003 11:03 am

Glenda Kronke wrote:
Gale aka artistefem wrote:"Gale, I still believe that even if an artist hasn't "found" their voice, it's only because they don't recognize it - not because it isn't there. I didn't mean to imply that it was " some unobtainable magic cloak that falls out of trees" and lands on special folks!!"

Jackie - LOL! You didn't imply this. It's simply my illustration that it is not a selective process. Finding, developing, having a visual voice is available to anyone.

We're in agreement that voice is inherently within each of us. Sometimes it's just needs a little extra sweet talking and coaxing to bring it out. I believe voice is not static - each of us are in different developmental stages of voice.

Peace...........my friend :D

I know the voice is within....as a matter of fact it is a screaming voice. I want to learn how to let it express itself.

I wish more classes were offered in this vein. I've heard that there are a few out there like Jack Doppler and Roger Thompson that offer courses like this (Bob L. has hinted at teaching along these lines). I believe that these types of courses are just as important as the technique courses. I would like to see more teachers exploring this route.

Iglenda




Glenda,

I don't know if you saw Judith Conway's posting a bit earlier in this thread... Steve Klein will be conducting two one-day classes on this very subject at Vitrum. Check out Judith's link to the class description. It sounds like it's just the kind of thing you're looking for. And the kind of course that I hope will become more and more prevalent... there's unbelievable value in attending a course that really makes you think about your work and your direction.

Catharine

Glenda Kronke
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Steve @ Vitrum

Postby Glenda Kronke » Wed Oct 01, 2003 11:34 am

Thanks Catharine. That sounds just like what I am looking for. I remember reading about it in the classifieds section and wondering how I could justify the airfare and hotel for a one day course. I might have to wait until I find something similar on the West Coast. I check the 'courses' section often but sometimes these classes fill up so fast!

thanks again,

glenda

Delores Taylor
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Re: Thoughtful work?

Postby Delores Taylor » Wed Oct 01, 2003 11:43 am

Hoping to get a discussion going:

I'm a voyeur at heart and am very interested in our (quite/most? often misguided) perceptions of others which are, of course, based upon our personal life experiences. This is where my work starts, why I choose the subjects I do...

Catharine[/quote]

1. Why are you doing the work that you do?

Because I find life a source of joy, sorrow and inspiration and it’s a way for me to express these emotions.

2. What is your thought process behind your work?

Each piece is unique so I have to fit the technique and type of process to the outcome I’m wanting.

3.Is there thought behind it?

Always

4.Have you researched your premise?

It depends on the subject matter that I’m addressing as some lack research and are pure emotion while other pieces often require intense amounts of research it depends on the subject I’m addressing.

5.What is it that you're saying, are you saying it clearly, and why are you saying it at all?

My work has a common thread of human strength and frailty as the dominate theme. Pate de verre as a medium visually depicts frailty and strength and I try and have fun using the medium’s different textures to make the point. The why is generally a commentary on what hits my emotions. Am I saying it clearly I hope so but others have to be the judge.

Tony Smith
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Re: Thoughtful work?

Postby Tony Smith » Wed Oct 01, 2003 12:23 pm

Delores wrote:Because I find life a source of joy, sorrow and inspiration and it’s a way for me to express these emotions.


I know this may be an ignorant question, but when you are sad, does your glass look different than when you are happy? Are you successful in conveying these emotions to the observer?

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Kathie Karancz
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Postby Kathie Karancz » Wed Oct 01, 2003 1:12 pm

Hey Tony: After reading all the messages, I hear what your saying: maybe I just need to lighten up and let it just happen...
Glenda: I so understand where your coming from - I am in the same place. I know that when you finally find whatever it is that you are looking for, it will be gorgeous. Maybe you just need to "let it happen" too. Sometimes my problem is I just think too much.
Jackie: thanks for everything that you just said
Bob: yes, you are sexy.....
Now, my question is: how do I get over all my insecurities and say - OK folks - this is it.... With or without "voice".
Kathie Karancz
Tribal Turtle
Victoria, British Columbia
http://www.tribalturtle.com

Tony Smith
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Postby Tony Smith » Wed Oct 01, 2003 1:20 pm

My point in asking was that I have seen paintings as well as stained glass that depicted various emotions... some very disturbing, some much more joyous, but they actually were depicting scenes as in formed images of what is around us. I don't see that in glass... I see patterns and depth and colors and shapes and textures. I just don't believe that it translates the same as images. (although I've seen some pretty disturbed glass...)

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Amy on Salt Spring
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Postby Amy on Salt Spring » Wed Oct 01, 2003 1:33 pm

Is it important that the piece immediately brings to mind for the viewer exactly what it expresses for the artist? If I have a piece that expresses sadness for me--it may convey none of that to you but its successful for me because I put that into the piece for me. Even if all you think is that its attractive or interesting or you even hate it, its still was a vehicle for me to say what I wanted to for me. I guess it all depends on what you really want from what you are doing. If you want the people viewing your work to understand you and your feelings and why you made it, then you better make some seriously representational art. If you are happy just expressing yourself and not having everyone immediately know or understand what you are saying then what does it matter if its an abstract message open to anyone's person interpretation. I personally like art that makes you have to find something in it that speaks to you--I find it fascinating to show a piece to someone and have them have a completely different reaction than why I created it. It gives me a different perspective when I see the piece through their eyes.
Amy

Delores Taylor
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Re: Thoughtful work?

Postby Delores Taylor » Wed Oct 01, 2003 1:44 pm

Tony Smith wrote:
Delores wrote:Because I find life a source of joy, sorrow and inspiration and it’s a way for me to express these emotions.


I know this may be an ignorant question, but when you are sad, does your glass look different than when you are happy? Are you successful in conveying these emotions to the observer?

Tony


No question is stupid and yes it does look different via choices of colors and the over all sense of edginess to the work. If I'm spoofing it will have more playful colors, etc. An example is my piece burnt offerings is in an intense orange color as I was over the simmer but feeling the heat from the stock market and corporate debackles that degraded the quality and confidience of the public and changed the climate for investing.

As a result lawsuits were filed and laws were written with many changes have transpired. Many investors were made to feel foolish and I used the image of a jester to depect my own feelings of loss in the stock market. Granted it was a big boat and I had tons of company as others also felt the sting of the market and are just as chagrined. Seemed like a paper bonfire for many of us. Once the market which showed great strength but in the end was subject to fralities and struggles and to this day has not regained the strength that we saw three years ago. Life has it's ups and downs .. the beat goes on. I like PB&J's anyway.

Tony Smith
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Postby Tony Smith » Wed Oct 01, 2003 2:23 pm

As an afterthought: If I really wanted to get people to think about my glass, I would make glass doorknockers... some would think about it before they used it, and others would think about it after they used it.... ](*,)

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Nikki ONeill
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Postby Nikki ONeill » Wed Oct 01, 2003 4:04 pm

Tony:
I recall a slide of one of Roger Thoma's pieces that he showed our class last March. Most of us thought it was a beautiful, semi-abstract scene of a sailboat with furled sails, leaning with the wind, and skimming across brilliant blue waves. We could see it all. Actually it was constructed to be a close-up of a squashed moth. :)

Nikki

S. Klein
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Postby S. Klein » Wed Oct 01, 2003 4:49 pm

Dear fellow artists. We cannot deny that we are artists. Nor should we be ashamed. If you want out, next time an admiring individual spends some of their hard earned money on one of your pieces that they will be proud to display or to use; tell them, that the work is thoughtless, doesn't mean a damn thing, and can be done by any moron with a kiln!

I believe that all work is about something. Some work is blatantly narrative. Some work is narrative in a subtle manner. Some work is about beliefs or history. Some work is about technique. The list is endless.

I think that art is a language. We will all speak it a little differently. Some artists will put so much time, thought, research and study into their language skills, that they will develop ways of communicating that defy technique and mesmerize their audiences. Most of us will not reach these plateaus, never the less, we will continue to make, because that is what artists do. Each piece will continue to inform the next piece or series.

Voices? Perhaps only the viewer can hear them?

This has been a fascinating thread. It's clear that everyone who has participated cares about themselves, their work and their audience. I'm proud to be associated with this group of artists.........steve
Steve Klein Studio
1650 N. Glassell, Studio U
Orange, CA 92867

Phil Hoppes
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Postby Phil Hoppes » Wed Oct 01, 2003 5:08 pm

S. Klein wrote:Dear fellow artists. We cannot deny that we are artists. Nor should we be ashamed. If you want out, next time an admiring individual spends some of their hard earned money on one of your pieces that they will be proud to display or to use; tell them, that the work is thoughtless, doesn't mean a damn thing, and can be done by any moron with a kiln!

I believe that all work is about something. Some work is blatantly narrative. Some work is narrative in a subtle manner. Some work is about beliefs or history. Some work is about technique. The list is endless.

I think that art is a language. We will all speak it a little differently. Some artists will put so much time, thought, research and study into their language skills, that they will develop ways of communicating that defy technique and mesmerize their audiences. Most of us will not reach these plateaus, never the less, we will continue to make, because that is what artists do. Each piece will continue to inform the next piece or series.

Voices? Perhaps only the viewer can hear them?

This has been a fascinating thread. It's clear that everyone who has participated cares about themselves, their work and their audience. I'm proud to be associated with this group of artists.........steve


VERY well put Steve. This really says it. Very astute perception that voices are not so much what one is saying but what other's hear. So true in all mediums of communication.

Phil


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