kiln floor repair - WarmGlass.com

kiln floor repair

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Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

kiln floor repair

Postby Luiza » Sat Nov 15, 2003 4:57 pm

Hi
I have a ceramic kiln that have elements on the floor and on all sides. Unfortunately the floor has some cracks, and it´s not as plain as desirable.
Last week two shelves cracked, and I know it was because the floor is not leveled. I was wondering if I can buy some kind of special "clay" to fill the floor cracks so that it become leveled again.
Can someone help me?
Thanks
Luiza

Kevin Midgley
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Location: Tofino, British Columbia, Canada

Postby Kevin Midgley » Sat Nov 15, 2003 5:52 pm

You could fill the cracks with some brick dust from ground up kiln bricks.
Are you putting your shelves right on top of the elements or leaving an air space? If the shelves are right on top of the elements that could be your problem because it would be hard to evenly heat and cool the shelves without the air space. Small cracks in the bottom of a kiln should not be a problem unless they are letting cold air into the kiln. The brick dust could be used to level the inside of the kiln. Other people might have better ideas.
Kevin

Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Postby Luiza » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:01 pm

Hi Kevin

I never put the shelf over the elemnts, I always leave 2 inches between them, using brick columns.
The problem is I can´t level them...
How can I find brick dust? It won´t spred over my glass?
Luiza

Tony Serviente
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Postby Tony Serviente » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:03 pm

I'd go with Kevins advice about making sure the shelves are off the floor, supported on kiln furniture by a half inch or more. As far as filling the cracks, if they are big enough to be a functional concern I'd go with refractory cement as a filler. Trouble with dust as a filler is it's dusty :) !
If the kiln door is closed too quickly you might get a nice coating of brick mist on the glass, leading to possibly interesting, distressing, and in either case unintended results.

Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Postby Luiza » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:09 pm

Hi Tony
I think I´ll try the refactory cement - I can buy it from a ceramic store . How do I use it?
Thanks
Luiza

Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Postby Luiza » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:10 pm

Hi Tony
I think I´ll try the refactory cement - I can buy it from a ceramic store . How do I use it?
Thanks
Luiza

Kevin Midgley
Posts: 713
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 11:36 am
Location: Tofino, British Columbia, Canada

Postby Kevin Midgley » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:18 pm

The brick dust suggestion was for small hairline cracks although I have put a thick layer on the bottom of a kiln which had seem some serious damage. You have to find someone with kiln bricks such as a kiln builder for a source of the dust.
I caution people that I have found that some refractory cements manage to devitrify my glass.
Leveling shelves can also be done by placing a small ball of moist clay on the top or bottom of your kiln posts and carefully placing the kiln shelf on top of the posts. Press gently on the shelf until level.
Kevin

Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Postby Luiza » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:58 pm

Kevin Midgley wrote:Leveling shelves can also be done by placing a small ball of moist clay on the top or bottom of your kiln posts and carefully placing the kiln shelf on top of the posts. Press gently on the shelf until level.
Kevin


The shinkage/expansion of the clay during the process of heating/cooling the kiln would not move the shelf? I have a big level problem, about 5mm...
Luiza

Kevin Midgley
Posts: 713
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 11:36 am
Location: Tofino, British Columbia, Canada

Postby Kevin Midgley » Sun Nov 16, 2003 3:08 am

Try it and see if it works without any glass in the kiln. Clay works best if allowed to dry properly. If done when wet it might explode. Kevin

Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Postby Luiza » Sun Nov 16, 2003 6:19 am

I´ll try it on monday.
Thanks a lot
Luiza

KILN-TEC
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Location: Prescott Valley,Arizona
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Postby KILN-TEC » Sun Nov 16, 2003 2:13 pm

Luiza:
Use Sairset (refractory cement) to patch the floor. If you have large cracks or holes, leave some out until it semi-hardens then press into cracks. Then heat with a propane torch until it hardens completely. Then take a sanding block and sand down the rough edges. Do not get the refractory cement on your Element!
If you can take the floor, flip it, and sand it down on a sanding table, you can look for low spots until the floor is level. Low spots will be where there is no brick dust after sanding. You can make a cheap sanding table, floor space, whatever, by glueing squares of sand paper down and then rotating the kiln floor on it.
Make sure to vacuum brick dust out of your element grooves when your done. This is best performed without the element installed, but old elements are very brittle and will most likely break if you try to remove and replace. Good luck!
Rich Edelman KILN-TEC http://www.kilntec.com

charlie
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:08 pm

Postby charlie » Mon Nov 17, 2003 10:57 am

Luiza wrote:
Kevin Midgley wrote:Leveling shelves can also be done by placing a small ball of moist clay on the top or bottom of your kiln posts and carefully placing the kiln shelf on top of the posts. Press gently on the shelf until level.
Kevin


The shinkage/expansion of the clay during the process of heating/cooling the kiln would not move the shelf? I have a big level problem, about 5mm...
Luiza


it just might be easier to level the kiln by putting shims under the legs. shims are triangular, so by moving them in and out, you can adjust the level of the kiln shelf.

Luiza
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:50 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Postby Luiza » Thu Nov 20, 2003 4:45 am

Thanks to all that helped me with so many options!
I did solv the problem with the littlle clay balls under the shepls, and with refractory cement in the cracks :D
Luiza

Ed Cantarella
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 3:49 pm
Location: Highland, Michigan, USA

Re: kiln floor repair

Postby Ed Cantarella » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:41 am

Triangular shims naturally want to scoot out if there is movement of the kiln, since they are an incline. Screw levelers are much better. For larger kilns I'd suggest machine leveling jacks - two triangle put face to face so they form two horizontal and parallel surfaces - a screw running through them means you can tighten/loosen the screw to move the one against the other but the outer surfaces are always parallel. And they can be adjusted to the finest degree. I worked in tool & die for many years and that is how it's done in industry. Google "machine leveling jacks wedge". Biggest problem you will have is finding smaller ones, the big ones are pricey but then again, they are made to hold up thousands of pounds each :shock: . Used ones are just fine, there is nothing to wear out. I saw this set of 4 on ebay for $60. 8)
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