Lap grinders - WarmGlass.com

Lap grinders

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Shralizy
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Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Washington State

Lap grinders

Postby Shralizy » Mon Jan 19, 2004 1:49 pm

I am looking into purchasing an 8" or 12" lap disc grinder with a recirculating water pump and would appreciate anyone's input/advice as to brands, size, ease of pad changes, price...

Thanks, Mary

Tony Serviente
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Location: Ithaca,NY
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Postby Tony Serviente » Mon Jan 19, 2004 3:53 pm

I have an SW 24" lap with magnetic pads, going on 14 years of hard use with no major problems. I don't know if Steve is still in business, but he offered great service and used to make smaller machines. I have heard lots of good things about Bob Stephans machines too-hisglassworks.com. I am a devoted magnetic diamond pad user and highly recommend them. It is very easy to change pads, there isn't grit to worry about, and cross contamination is not an issue. True, the pads are expensive, but they can last a long time.

Jack Bowman
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Postby Jack Bowman » Mon Jan 19, 2004 6:56 pm

Tony,

Are you recirculating your cooling water? How about the other folks out there using laps. Will recirculated cooling water work? Seems to me if it does it might produce a problem at the polishing stage.

Jack

Dolores
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Postby Dolores » Mon Jan 19, 2004 7:50 pm

Mary,
I just purchased an 8" grinder from Hisglassworks a few weeks back and I absolutely love it (the first time I used it I wanted to kiss that machine!). It has variable speed and uses magetic diamond pads etc. It runs for $345 sans pads, which is a whole lot less expensive than the $1000 on up for 12" machines. It's a great size for a jewelry artist or someone doing small detailed work. At least it was a real step up from my Inland 5" disc system!

DOLORES

Shralizy
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Washington State

Postby Shralizy » Mon Jan 19, 2004 9:15 pm

Thanks for your quick responses! I think I misspoke when I said recirculating water pump. I am unable to hook up directly to a water supply so I am looking for one with that doesn't require it.

Here is the deal, I want to be able to produce perfectly straight, smooth, polished edges on pieces like bracelets as well as plates and bowls... Like everyone else, I want to achieve the most professional finished product that I can. I am not doing mass production but would like to be able to create more in less time. After reading through tons of messages and archive info I am confused as to what I really need. I have a Glastar All Star grinder and would like to know what else I need to achieve the results I want, be it a lap grinder, wet belt sander, acid wash...

I would greatly appreciate it if anyone could help me out and explain the process and the right tools for the job.

Thank you, Mary

Tony Serviente
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Location: Ithaca,NY
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Postby Tony Serviente » Mon Jan 19, 2004 10:43 pm

Mary-For perfect straight edges, a lap is it. Belt sanders with a flat platen behind the belt are ok for short straight edges, mine can do about 8" or so, but if you want to do longer, or the edges of bowls they get difficult, if not impossible to use. My water supply is non recirculating.I have a feed from the cold water supply, and underneath is a container from the pan, with a submersible pump. When the water level gets to a certain height, it pumps to my building drain. I did it that way because it was not convenient to locate my wheel near a sink drain, and the alternative would have been to jack hammer up my concrete floor.

Brock
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Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Postby Brock » Mon Jan 19, 2004 11:01 pm

Hey Tony - I use a WBS to finish all my work. I use it prior to the slump. but I'm mechanically polishing the edges of sushis and bowls, not fire polishung them. We teach a course using a WBS to finish edges. Both machines have their uses. A WBS puts a great finish on the edge of a bowl, not the flat rim. Brock


Tony Serviente wrote:Mary-For perfect straight edges, a lap is it. Belt sanders with a flat platen behind the belt are ok for short straight edges, mine can do about 8" or so, but if you want to do longer, or the edges of bowls they get difficult, if not impossible to use. My water supply is non recirculating.I have a feed from the cold water supply, and underneath is a container from the pan, with a submersible pump. When the water level gets to a certain height, it pumps to my building drain. I did it that way because it was not convenient to locate my wheel near a sink drain, and the alternative would have been to jack hammer up my concrete floor.
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Tony Serviente
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Location: Ithaca,NY
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Postby Tony Serviente » Mon Jan 19, 2004 11:28 pm

What I was thinking of was the the flat plane edge, what you get by inverting a bowl on a lap. I actually like the more "organic" edge I get from my WBS.

Brock
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 1:32 pm
Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Postby Brock » Mon Jan 19, 2004 11:29 pm

Tony Serviente wrote:What I was thinking of was the the flat plane edge, what you get by inverting a bowl on a lap. I actually like the more "organic" edge I get from my WBS.


Yes, I thought you were. I prefer the flat rim, but find it more work. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Marty
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Postby Marty » Tue Jan 20, 2004 9:22 am

Jack Bowman wrote:Tony,

Are you recirculating your cooling water? How about the other folks out there using laps. Will recirculated cooling water work? Seems to me if it does it might produce a problem at the polishing stage.

Jack


Jack- I'm recirculating the water but I've got a cascade system (fancy name for 3 buckets in line- each overflowing into the next with the pump in the last one) to minimize gunk coming back. However, I'm only going to 140 grit (occasionally to 280) and then sandblasting. Bob Stephan (HIS) says that diamonds can loosen and contaminate if you recirculate when trying for a polish. I've thought of a filter system but haven't done anything about it. Marty

Shralizy
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Washington State

Postby Shralizy » Tue Jan 20, 2004 12:46 pm

Thanks Tony for your advice. I see by Brocks message that everyone has their own personal preferences and until I have a chance to work on either machine I won't know what works best for me. Thus the quandry continues.

Wish I could find a finish work class near me. Know of any?

Mary

Bob
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Location: Salt Spring Island, British Columbia
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Postby Bob » Tue Jan 20, 2004 1:23 pm

Mary,

One of our illustrious warmglass board members, Doug Randall, has taught classes at his studio in Portland. He is VERY knowledgable. Perhaps contact him via personal message.

There are lots of studios in the Pacific NW. There has to be something in Seattle.

Cheers,

Bob

Patty Gray
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Location: Washington
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Postby Patty Gray » Tue Jan 20, 2004 1:38 pm

Hi Mary,

I love my lapwheel. For personal studio use I have a 24" with diamond magnetic disks. For teaching with I have a Glastar 8" also with the diamond magnetic disks. The 8" one is portable which was one of the requirements (I have to carry these upstairs & down at many of the locations I teach). I also have two full size wetbelts and I love them also. Last night we started a new addtion to the equipment (vibrolap). I wanted something that I could ground the edge of a bowl flat (these are normally at least 30 lbs of glass so it gets quite heavy for me to do the inital grinding). One tool that wasn't mentioned is the hand held grinder/polisher. That tool is wonderful.

What part of Washington do you live? Firehouse down in Vancouver, WA has coldworking classes - not sure how extensive they are but you can check them out. As Bob mentioned, Doug Randal has a grand studio and if he gives more coldworking classes they will fill in a minute due to his expertise in coldworking/finishing glass and fusing.

Good luck on your quest, my only diamonds are on my tools/equipment.

Patty
http://www.pattygray.com

Shralizy
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Washington State

Postby Shralizy » Tue Jan 20, 2004 1:55 pm

Hi Patty,

Funny you should reply to my message seeing that I live in Bellevue and just found out about your "Fusing Secrets" class in April at Cascade Art Glass in Redmond. I was unable to take any of your classes at Hot Glass Horizons in Portland last year (too many choices so little time) so was very excited to see that you will be in my neighborhood. I really enjoy your work and web site. I'm pretty new to the world of glass fusing and am so grateful for any help/info I can get.

Hope to see you in April,
Mary

Siyeh
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Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2004 10:37 am
Location: Atlanta, GA USA
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Postby Siyeh » Wed Jan 21, 2004 1:44 pm

I have a WBS that I have never successfully used and from what I read here, the problem is definitely with me and not with the machine. :? So I, too, need to find a coldworking class, but I am in Atlanta. Anyone know of any resources down my way? Thanks...

Brenda Griffith
Siyeh Studio


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