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Ann Demko
Posts: 104
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 11:54 pm
Location: Owensboro, KY

camera

Postby Ann Demko » Sat Jan 24, 2004 5:27 pm

Hi all. I followed the instructions on building a photo booth, using bits and pieces form several contributors, and was well pleased with the results of my first sample photos. I am using a Pentax point and click camera and the auto zoom that it has appears to be adequate for my larger items such as bowls and candle shelters but was not feasible for jewelry. I got some jewelry pictures in focus but they needed to be a lot closer. I have an early digital model and think I would prefer to use a slr camera, since I'm happy with the large item photos. I can have the film developed for prints and have them also put on CD for a very reasonable price. From there maybe I can learn to tweek on the computer, if the old saying about old dogs and new tricks isn't true. Does anyone on the board use an old fashioned SLR camera and do you all have any suggestions? My son has lenses for a cannon camera that died many years ago, would they be interchangeable with other brands or am I limited to cannon? Thanks for the info. Ann

Paul Housberg
Posts: 103
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2003 1:08 pm
Location: Rhode Island
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Postby Paul Housberg » Sat Jan 24, 2004 9:11 pm

For slides and general documentation of work an SLR is still preferable to digital with the possible exception of professional digital SLR's which are fabulously expensive. SLRs are hardly old fashion. If the Canon lenses your son has are suitable for your purposes—sounds like you need a macro—you can probably pick up a used Canon camera body for not a lot. I don't think the lenses are interchangeable with other brands, but Canon is a very decent brand.
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Paul Housberg
Glass Project, Inc.
Art Glass Feature Walls
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Jonathan
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2003 3:08 pm
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
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Postby Jonathan » Sat Jan 24, 2004 9:34 pm

I know this is my first post, but photogrpahy is a hobby of mine. First, you need to check to see if your canon lenses are for a manual focus camera or an auto focus. I would assume it's manual focus if the lenses are older, but it doesn't hurt to check. I have 2 canon AE1's, which are manual focus, and I'm very happy with them. I also have a Canon Rebel TI which is auto focus, and I love it. The best place I've found to buy a used camea body is http://www.KEH.com. They have pretty good prices. Just make sure that you don't get a camera that's grade is Bargin, those are bad news. Try to get one that's at least Excellent, and better if possible. Also, a macro lense would help a lot. Check and see if one of your lenses has that feature, a lot of the larger zoom lenses (ie 90-200mm zooms) have a macro setting.

Good luck!
Jonathan

Jonathan
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2003 3:08 pm
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
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Postby Jonathan » Sat Jan 24, 2004 9:37 pm

I forgot to add something. Canon lenses are not interchangable with other brands. Also, you can't you manual focus lenses with an auto focus camera and vice versa.

Jonathan

Don Burt
Posts: 537
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:45 pm
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
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Postby Don Burt » Sat Jan 24, 2004 10:30 pm

I'd recommend gathering your lenses, heading-up to a full-service Louisville Canon dealer, and having them go through your stuff and see if they can help you out. Tell the camera geeks there what you want to do and let them expound on their inventory. You may find that you have a nice lens that just needs a little stepping close-up lens attachment to take good jewelry shots. If they have a Canon back available they can test the mechanics of the lenses, and maybe evaluate them for scratches and lens disease. Call them first.

You sure that Canon back is dead and can't be repaired? Maybe its just mostly dead. - M. Max.

Ann Demko
Posts: 104
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 11:54 pm
Location: Owensboro, KY

camera

Postby Ann Demko » Sun Jan 25, 2004 11:09 am

Thank you ALL for your great responses, I really appreciate your sharing. I am looking forward to the day when I can give the same kind of quality advice to others. I've been working in warm glass for about two years, mostly weekends, and still feel like a newbie. Ann

Bob
Posts: 215
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 1:01 pm
Location: Salt Spring Island, British Columbia
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Postby Bob » Mon Jan 26, 2004 11:21 am

Ann

I would strongly suggest that you get a camera that allows you to manually control the exposure by varying either or both of the aperature and shutter speed. Fully automatic cameras will average the exposure over all or a large part of the field of view, and make assumptions about what is best for exposure (mainly affects white).

I agree that reviving your son's Canon would be a good start. Then, if you are not familiar with cameras and how they work, go to a library and read a couple of chapters on exposure settings, light meters and depth of field. It is pretty useful stuff and will help you take great photos of your work.

Cheers,

Bob

Glenda Kronke
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 11:44 am
Location: Austin, TX
Contact:

mostly dead

Postby Glenda Kronke » Mon Jan 26, 2004 11:41 am

Don Burt wrote:

You sure that Canon back is dead and can't be repaired? Maybe its just mostly dead. - M. Max.



Is this a kissing story?

glenda


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