removal of super glue - WarmGlass.com

removal of super glue

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

Moderators: Tony Smith, Brad Walker

Post Reply
Terry Ow-Wing
Posts: 124
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 3:21 pm
Location: San Francisco, Ca.
Contact:

removal of super glue

Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:03 am

I have a client that broke a piece of my art and tried using superglue. I'm going to see if I can refuse it together but I am concerned about the super glue. What can I use to get it off ? Will it burn off or cause bubbles if trapped between 2 layers of glass.
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
Image

S.TImmerman
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 9:23 am
Location: San Diego ,Ca

Re: removal of super glue

Postby S.TImmerman » Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:58 am

They sell super glue remover in a lot of stores if you need to remove it.
Shereen


http://www.homedepot.com/buy/bondini-17 ... QdgMGt5mK0

jim simmons
Posts: 466
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 10:37 pm
Location: Hillsboro Oregon
Contact:

Re: removal of super glue

Postby jim simmons » Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:42 pm

acetone, or fingernail polish remover
Jim

Morganica
Posts: 1079
Joined: Mon May 19, 2003 6:19 pm
Location: Portland, OR
Contact:

Re: removal of super glue

Postby Morganica » Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:19 pm

Actually, I use superglue on glass all the time, precisely because it holds for awhile but comes off easily. If the glass isn't heavily textured you should be able to slide a new razorblade underneath and pop it off. (My worksurfaces are all glass, precisely for this reason--easy to clean off any goop I might spill)

If it won't come off, soak the piece in warm water for awhile (or even take it to a rolling boil if you're feeling lucky, and let it cool naturally). That'll usually get enough water into the joint to start sliding it off. I make razor slashes through a larger expanse to let the moisture seep in and speed things up.

Solvents are usually my last resort. The problem with using acetone or superglue remover (when you don't absolutely need to) is that it softens the stuff and spreads it, so that you wind up then having to remove the remover.
Cynthia Morgan
Marketeer, Webbist, Glassist
http://www.morganica.com/bloggery
http://www.cynthiamorgan.com

"I wrote, therefore I was." (me)

S.TImmerman
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 9:23 am
Location: San Diego ,Ca

Re: removal of super glue

Postby S.TImmerman » Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:05 pm

Ohhhh so sorry! Guess that's what happens when fairly inexperienced folks ( me) try to help. My apologies!

Georgia Novak
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 2:54 am

Re: removal of super glue

Postby Georgia Novak » Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:51 pm

I use super glue all the time ot hold pieces together while carrying to the kiln. I have found that soaking in water for 24 to 36 hours will allow seperation. Then a razor blade on the remainder will pop it off. Georgia

Terry Ow-Wing
Posts: 124
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 3:21 pm
Location: San Francisco, Ca.
Contact:

Re: removal of super glue

Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:38 pm

Morganica wrote:Actually, I use superglue on glass all the time, precisely because it holds for awhile but comes off easily......



Does this mean if I have some super glue exposed in some textured areas the fusing will just burn it off? I haven't seen the piece in peerson yet but I think there isprobably superglue in areas that I won't be able to get to witha raser blade.

thanks...T
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
Image

Morganica
Posts: 1079
Joined: Mon May 19, 2003 6:19 pm
Location: Portland, OR
Contact:

Re: removal of super glue

Postby Morganica » Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:46 pm

If it's exposed on the surface I think it probably would burn off without a trace. Otherwise, I find the longer the superglue sits before firing, the more likely you are to get a white, ashy residue on firing. I suspect it's because the stuff is a bit hygroscopic and starts absorbing moisture...which turns it white.
Cynthia Morgan
Marketeer, Webbist, Glassist
http://www.morganica.com/bloggery
http://www.cynthiamorgan.com

"I wrote, therefore I was." (me)


Post Reply

Return to “Techniques and Tools”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 48 guests

Warm Glass

2575 Old Glory Road, Suite 700
Suite 700
Clemmons, NC 27012
Phone: (336) 712 8003
Email: wg@warmglass.com