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argh HELP WITH MOLD IDEAS

Posted: Sat Feb 07, 2004 6:23 pm
by Billy Wynn
After spending a year preparing ten pieces for my states craftsman's guild my application was rejected because I used purchased molds This is despite the fact that the pieces were fused carved sandblasted etched and in some cases hand detailed. They said using molds destroyed artistic integrity. :oops: so I need help with highly reusible molds for plates platters and bowl slumping. I have never made molds and really need a jump on this so that I may reach my goal of being a member of the guild. I knew they had a no mold in the pottery rules but not in the glass rules because no one had ever entered in warm glass




A year down the tubes


Bill

What?

Posted: Sat Feb 07, 2004 10:29 pm
by Clifford Ross
Cast your butt in glass and tell the panel to kiss it! :badgrin:

Re: What?

Posted: Sat Feb 07, 2004 10:58 pm
by Ron Coleman
Clifford Ross wrote:Cast your butt in glass and tell the panel to kiss it! :badgrin:


As long as you can cast it without a mold.

:wink:

Posted: Sat Feb 07, 2004 11:05 pm
by Ron Coleman
Just curious who "THEY" are and if you really want to be part of "THEM"?

Did "THEY" just come up with the no mold deal, or is it written down? [-X

More fun to play the game when the rules are know before the kickoff.

Sounds like a group I'd want to avoid.

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 1:16 am
by Billy Wynn
I live in a VERY rural state, the guild puts on the only serious craft show in the state. It would also give me access to two gift shops one in the capitol city and another in the other majjor metro are in my state.


I can use molds but only ones that I design and make



Bill

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 2:19 am
by Carol
[quote="BIGGBILL"]I live in a VERY rural state, the guild puts on the only serious craft show in the state. It would also give me access to two gift shops one in the capitol city and another in the other majjor metro are in my state.

Bill

I see these as being 2 completely separate issues. Is your goal to be a guild member and be in their craft show, OR, is your goal to sell your art through the two gift shops you mentioned? You can do the latter without the former...call up, book an appointment with the owner or manager of each shop to show your work. If your work is good enough and/or would appeal to their clientele, whether you have or have not exhibited in a single show shouldn't matter. On the other hand, if your goal is to become a guild member rather than making sales, by all means jump to their rules.

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 2:43 am
by daffodildeb
Bill, what state is it? Hope it's not where I'm planning to move in a few years for retirement. [-o<

Sorry about your loss, but I'm sure you've learned a lot along the way. Once you make your own molds I'll bet you'll pass with flying colors. :lol:

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 3:25 am
by Billy Wynn
[quote="CarolI see these as being 2 completely separate issues. Is your goal to be a guild member and be in their craft show, OR, is your goal to sell your art through the two gift shops you mentioned? You can do the latter without the former...call up, book an appointment with the owner or manager of each shop to show your work. If your work is good enough and/or would appeal to their clientele, whether you have or have not exhibited in a single show shouldn't matter. On the other hand, if your goal is to become a guild member rather than making sales, by all means jump to their rules.[/quote]


actually the guild owns the shops

plus i really do want to be a member i'm just hurt that i spent a year and should have asked about using commercial molds since they can't be used for ceramics

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:18 am
by Marilyn Kaminski
If you get new original molds made, would you be able to re-slump the pieces and submit them to the jury again? Sometimes the design lends itself to that.

- Marilyn

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 11:08 am
by Allan Gott
If I were you I'd be taking a long hard look at Ron Coleman's most recent thread in Photos and Stuff - "A Little Splash of Color" for the best mold making idea I've ever seen here on wgbb, and a nice piece of work.

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2004 12:26 pm
by Ann Demko
Bill, You have thrown me into somewhat of a panic. I am working on pieces to hopefully get into an organization called Kentucky Crafters. This isn't the same group is it? Ann

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 8:18 am
by Peg
actually the guild owns the shops


So if you were to open your own shop I bet there'd be queues round the block of 'non-guild' crafters with wares to sell.... or are they the sort of 'guild' who'd put a horses head in your bed to warn you off?!

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 8:22 am
by daffodildeb
Bill, we're all dying to know--where do you live? You didn't put it in your profile. Or are you trying to be a 007 type? :-#

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:04 pm
by Paul Housberg
How did the guild (NH?) determine you used purchased molds? If these were conventional forms, there are so many mold forms available that it would be hard to distinguish between a purchased mold and a mold you made yourself.

In any case, you might find a potter to throw you some forms to your specs. Use terra cotta and bisque only—I think—but a knowledgable potter or others on this board should be able to advise you.

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:06 pm
by Paul Housberg
How did the guild (NH?) determine you used purchased molds? If these were conventional forms, there are so many mold forms available that it would be hard to distinguish between a purchased mold and a mold you made yourself.

In any case, you might find a potter to throw you some forms to your specs. Use terra cotta and bisque only—I think—but a knowledgable potter or others on this board should be able to advise you. Put a few holes in the bottom and mound the center very slightly so the item sits flat.

Re: argh HELP WITH MOLD IDEAS

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:04 pm
by Cynthia
BIGGBILL wrote:After spending a year preparing ten pieces for my states craftsman's guild my application was rejected because I used purchased molds This is despite the fact that the pieces were fused carved sandblasted etched and in some cases hand detailed. They said using molds destroyed artistic integrity. :oops:


It's not unusual for rules that make sense for clay - or any medium for that matter - (I suspect they wanted to eliminate entries of slipcast, painted cornucopia's) to be applied to another medium willy nilly even though it may not make sense. Talk to the powers that be about your kiln fired glass. Won't help with this years entry obviously, but may impact the jury for following years...Couldn't hurt.

I don't really think that using molds necessarily destroys artistic integrity...but form is as important in the piece as is design and content - or I should say that it isn't something you can separate out from the whole. Although I adore my ball molds from Bullseye, there are scads of bowls out there that now are looking quite a bit alike because it's such a popular form. Just something to think about, particularly if you are putting yourself in the shoes of the jurors...They've gotta have some way to weed down the entries. Whether it seems fair or right is another topic :roll:

...so I need help with highly reusible molds for plates platters and bowl slumping. I have never made molds and really need a jump on this so that I may reach my goal of being a member of the guild. I knew they had a no mold in the pottery rules but not in the glass rules because no one had ever entered in warm glass

A year down the tubes


Bill


Think of it as part of the learning curve rather than a year down the tubes. :wink: They gave you the guidelines for what they want, and think of this - You now can take your well attended to designs, and shape them into a unique form that is distinctively yours....

Design some pieces that require a particular form. Then hand build with a raku clay (takes the heat / cool process of repeated firing rather well according to Amy in Milwaukee...) or have a potter throw some forms for you. And to be certain that your work, in respect to form, is not run of the mill...make these forms a bit out of the ordinary in either size or shape...Perhaps you want some triangular platters or something a touch unexpected, but relatable. I expect your guild is tying to hang a show that is unique and inovative. If you want to play with them, meet their challenge. :) Sounds like it's time they included some glass, eh?

Good fortune. It sounds to me like you will be able to make this happen for you.

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 5:27 pm
by Sandpiper
Cynthia, you are a voice of reason, good sense, and encouragment. I've been following this thread with great interest, because I am going to try to jury into a show that has a rule that states "no moldware". I assume that they are talking ceramics, but I worry about everything, so I started worrying about this about a month ago. Now this thread comes up. So very timely. I don't know enough about ceramics to make a mold. Heck, I'm still a glass newbie.

Does anyone else run into this problem? Is it just us newbies that use commercial molds? How do you guys find the time to produce enough glass and molds for shows if you are doing both?

Thanks in advance

Sandpiper, alias Robin

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 6:33 pm
by charlie holden
This is one of my favorite rants. Shape, color, pattern, texture -- all the formal elements are important.

I agree with the guild. If you are using a shape that you bought in a store that anyone else can buy, why should you be considered a craftsman while others using that shape are considered newbies? Meanwhile, if your designs are strong enough, why does it need to be slumped into a piece of tableware anyway? Make sculpture instead. Make pieces with a flat edge, and just bend them across that plane and they will stand on their own.

Look at ceramics magazines for ideas. There are so many potters out there that they have to be very inventive about shape.

Meanwhile, since you've got some molds on hand, modify them. Cut pieces of fiber blanket and lay them in, over, around the bowls to make wavy edges, or lines across the center, or extra levels, or steeper sides. Press soft clay slabs into your molds to get a basic shape then fold, bend and mutilate them around, dry them, bisque fire them and kilnwash them. Cut shapes out of plywood, cover them losely with a stretchy fabric, lay a soft clay slab over that and press into the center -- easy bowl of your design.

Also, as Ted likes to say, never refuse to re-fuse, or re-slump as the case may be. Change the pieces you've already made.

ch

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 7:26 pm
by Billy Wynn
I can't really say where I live because my partner doesn't want me to for fear that some other craftsperson might read this know who we are and turn my rants into something that they are really not.


I understand the rule, I just don't think glass and ceramic's are the same medium. I CAN"T SAY WHERE I LIVE (NOT KY) but it is a gulf coast state.

I have already started making plans for next year's application. As to the scupture suggestion, the guild has a sort of dilema distinguishing between arts and crafts. So they like for there to be function and form.



As to how they knew I used commercialy made molds I had to submit slides showing every phase of the design, production, firing and finishing of 5 items and them submit 5 different items to be juried.


Bill

Posted: Mon Feb 09, 2004 8:25 pm
by Gale aka artistefem
This is the most rigorous application process I have ever heard of for a state art guild application.

Either they've had severe abuses in the past or they are trying to raise the bar. WOW!