Sandblaster - WarmGlass.com

Sandblaster

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

Moderators: Tony Smith, Brad Walker

Post Reply
RachelM
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:26 pm

Sandblaster

Postby RachelM » Sun Apr 28, 2013 3:19 pm

The studio where I help out at is tossing around the idea of getting a sandblasting system. The studio manager asked me if the same unit could be used for BOTH glass and ceramics. He has no experience in glass ( he manages the ceramic side) and the owner is currently out on maternity leave.

So, could one system be set up for both glass and ceramics?
Can the same nozzels be used?
Same material for blasting?

Any help in terms of reference materials would be helpful as well.

Thanks in advance.

Rachel
Imaglassydiva@aol.com

Brock
Posts: 1519
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 1:32 pm
Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Brock » Sun Apr 28, 2013 3:49 pm


Kevin Midgley
Posts: 713
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 11:36 am
Location: Tofino, British Columbia, Canada

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Kevin Midgley » Sun Apr 28, 2013 4:11 pm

use aluminum oxide.

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Tony Smith » Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:18 am

What Brock said.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Jeanne
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2003 8:16 am
Location: NJ

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Jeanne » Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:27 am

White aluminum oxide. 120 grit is nice.

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Tony Smith » Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:45 pm

White or brown. Doesn't make a difference. Or use silicon carbide. Do not use sand, glass beads or iron slag (black magic). 120 grit is best for general use.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Joe Wokovich
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 1:57 pm
Location: Florissant, MO (@ St. Louis, MO)

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Joe Wokovich » Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:58 pm

I stay away from the silicon carbide. Two reasons.

First is that in my opinion the use of the silicon carbide has the potential for more devit when firing glass. Lots of people say that that isn't true and you can always start a discussion about this that ends up with shouting matches.

Aluminum oxide cuts and as it does the grit wears down and the sharp cutting edges round off. It does have the potential for some fantastic static shocks when the humidity is right. Make sure to ground your sand cabinet to help eliminate this problem.

Silicon Carbide is usually at least twice as expensive as aluminum oxide. Silicon carbide last much longer than the Sic.

When the Sic makes contact with the blasted object, the granules will break down with use but the granules always facture and consequently even when the grit size gets smaller and smaller it will still cut nicely and I use it then especially for half tones.

When the AO makes contact the grits sharpness wears and the grit loses its cutting surface and makes for longer blast times.

All of this is IMHO.

Joe
“If you tell me, I will forget.
If you show me, I will remember.
If you let me do it, I will understand."

And then tomorrow I can start all over again

Buttercup
Posts: 555
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:22 pm
Location: S.E. Queensland Australia

Re: Sandblaster

Postby Buttercup » Tue Apr 30, 2013 2:22 am

KMS Tools publishes a helpful guide on buying a compressor:
http://www.kmstools.com/compressors-13000000/

Jen


Post Reply

Return to “Techniques and Tools”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 41 guests

Warm Glass

2575 Old Glory Road, Suite 700
Suite 700
Clemmons, NC 27012
Phone: (336) 712 8003
Email: wg@warmglass.com