Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature - WarmGlass.com

Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

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CCVICKERS
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Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2014 12:06 pm

Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

Postby CCVICKERS » Wed Mar 12, 2014 2:34 pm

Hello,
I'm interested in attempting a pot melt or screen melt. I've been researching this process on-line and see that the consensus for the high temperature is 1700f. I have a new Paragon Fusion 16 - love it!!! :D - with a max temp of 1700f. I'm very new to fusing, so I hope that these aren't #-o questions...

Will I damage my kiln by running it at the max temp and holding for an extended period of time? (i.e. 1700 hold for 90 min)
Could I fire at a lower temp, say 1600, and hold for a longer period?

Has anyone done a pot / mesh melt in a kiln that maxes at 1700? What was your experience?

Any advice is GREATLY appreciated!

Brad Walker
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Re: Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

Postby Brad Walker » Wed Mar 12, 2014 2:44 pm

Most glass kilns max at 1700F. You can hold there quite a while, but 90 minutes is likely more than you need.

You may get away with firing to 1650 for a pot melt, and I generally fire wire melts that low or lower anyway.

If you use Spectrum glass, it will fire a bit lower than Bullseye.

Mike Jordan
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Re: Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

Postby Mike Jordan » Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:39 pm

I've gone as low as 1605 in my Skutt 1014 kiln. It took a bit longer than when I went higher and it didn't get every bit of glass, but it filled the 1" stainless steel ring I was using. This was with Bullseye glass. I was going to go even lower the next time I did a pot melt, but I've not done one since. The big advantage of going lower is less sticking of the kiln wash to the glass and what does stick comes off a lot easier. At higher temps you will get more sticking and some of it is on pretty good and won't come off no matter how long you soak it in vinegar or scrub it. Sandblasting would probably be the only way to get it off completely. At least this has been my experience with pot melts.

Mike
It's said that inside each of us is an artist trying to get out. Well mine got out... and I haven't seen him since.

carol carson
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Re: Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

Postby carol carson » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:07 pm

You should look at this tutorial by Steve Immerman, it's good.
http://www.clearwaterglass.com/Tutorials/AperturePour.html

CCVICKERS
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Re: Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

Postby CCVICKERS » Fri Mar 14, 2014 7:41 pm

Thank you all for some excellent info!

Jerrwel
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Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2005 6:25 pm
Location: Charlotte, NC

Re: Pot melts and minimum fireing temperature

Postby Jerrwel » Sat Mar 15, 2014 2:16 pm

Brad Walker wrote:Most glass kilns max at 1700F. You can hold there quite a while, but 90 minutes is likely more than you need.

You may get away with firing to 1650 for a pot melt, and I generally fire wire melts that low or lower anyway.

If you use Spectrum glass, it will fire a bit lower than Bullseye.

Contemporary Fused Glasshttp://www.warmglass.com/cfg/ contains information about high temperature firings. You will find this beautiful presentation invaluable for all your early efforts in fusing. I misplaced my copy of the book some time ago and will gladly buy his updated version on my next visit to Clemmons.
Jerry


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