BE 1101 clear powder problem - WarmGlass.com

BE 1101 clear powder problem

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blenderbender
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BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby blenderbender » Wed Mar 12, 2014 7:39 pm

Howdy folks.... I've had an ongoing issue anytime I've used BE 1101 clear powder as a cap or as grout between other pieces. It always, always, always fires foggy, wispy white kind of. I usually fire to around 1500 when I use it. I've actually shied away from it by using other methods, but today I tried again all for naught. I'm beginning to think my 1101 clear, well, isn't. Has anyone else ever experienced this? Thanks..... Gary

The Hobbyist
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby The Hobbyist » Wed Mar 12, 2014 10:41 pm

The powder is trapping tiny bubbles and they are giving it that cloudy white look. Try using larger frit.

Jim
"With or without religion, good people can behave well and bad people can do evil; but for good people to do evil—that takes religion. " Steven Weinberg

carol carson
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby carol carson » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:04 pm

Are you always using the same jar, or have you tried a few to make sure it's the powder?

Brad Walker
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby Brad Walker » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:27 pm

Use less powder. Too thick and (as Jim said) you trap air bubbles. You just want it to be a couple of grains of powder thick.

If you want a thicker layer of glass, use coarse frit instead of powder. (I think Jim said that, too.) One layer of frit or you'll get bubbles there also.

Morganica
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby Morganica » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:29 pm

If that's the problem, and you look closely; you should be able to see the bubbles Jim mentions. It does that to me, too, whenever I get the powder layer a little too thick. I think it's a problem for smaller items like pendants, especially. (People have a tendency to bring small objects close, so the bubbles become very obvious).

The powder layer needs to be fairly thin, so that there's not enough there to trap bubbles. On the other hand, if you don't use enough, you get an orange peel effect. That's why I really don't like to use that technique unless I just have to. I think after you have some practice with the technique you won't have as much trouble.
Cynthia Morgan
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carol carson
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby carol carson » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:36 pm

Wow, I didn't realize you didn't like that technique Cynthia. I use it all the time to cap my drawings. You are right though, I use it just as a thin even dusting.

blenderbender
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby blenderbender » Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:04 am

Thanks all.... NOW I REMEMBER!. It's been about 4 years since I've fired anything due to a sell house/move/re-locate/setup shop again, and many things I used to know have become foggy (like the 1101 clear powder) in my aging head. It's good to be back though and I'm certain there are lots of little things I will re-discover in the process..... Gary

Morganica
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Re: BE 1101 clear powder problem

Postby Morganica » Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:32 pm

carol carson wrote:Wow, I didn't realize you didn't like that technique Cynthia. I use it all the time to cap my drawings. You are right though, I use it just as a thin even dusting.

Yep, I know (and you're a wizard at it). I use it infrequently enough that I have trouble getting the right amount on, and for what I'm doing, usually, even a few small bubbles are a problem. Plus, since I do pate de verre where you WANT lots of small bubbles, I'm really sensitive to it.

I think it's much less likely to be a problem when you're sifting across larger, flat panels of glass--it's easier to get an even coat without falloff. I tend to work with curved, dimensional surfaces, especially with small pendants, so I get a bunch of powder on the surface and it slides off the curves. That makes the contrast (and bubbles) really obvious.

Usually, devit on a surface doesn't bother me much, because I coldwork so extensively anyway. I'm presenting a fresh, clean surface to the heat, so I'm not really giving the devit a chance to grow. When I do get devit, though, it's spectacular. Like this cityscene:
devitcityscene.jpg

Which SHOULD look like this:
clearcityscene.jpg

That one, not even coldwork would save. ;-)
Cynthia Morgan
Marketeer, Webbist, Glassist
http://www.morganica.com/bloggery
http://www.cynthiamorgan.com

"I wrote, therefore I was." (me)


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