Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc. - WarmGlass.com

Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

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Havi
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Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Havi » Sat Mar 15, 2014 6:12 pm

I never did silkscreen, even though I have been printing a lot. Mostly I printed collographs and etchings . I have a great etching press which I brought home upon returning from USa, years ago.

However, I also have a screen and a squeegee.


Can anybody tell me what emulsion do I need to use,
AND
how, or with what should I mix the glass powder, in order to pass it thru the screen???? :-k :-k

I want to do simple silk screen, not photographic


I'd be more than grateful, This is quite important to me.

Many thanks,
Havi

I
Haviva Z
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"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
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tbach
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby tbach » Mon Mar 17, 2014 11:50 am

Check out Stacey Lynn Smith - works at Bullseye. She has developed a system of imagery which is achieved by sifting fine glass powdered frit through prepared silkscreens. The clarity of images and texture is dependent upon the firing temp used. Her work will spark your imagination. I have been told that she has a facebook page "Print & Glass" for "sifting" followers. Don't use Facebook, so I can't verify.

I use screenprinting - both enamels and powdered frit in most of my glasswork - for some reason I saw the connection immediately when I began fusing. The type of emulsion does not matter much . . . just that you are comfortable with timing in order to get a useable screen. It takes some hit and miss stuff to figure that out. Stacey uses screens in the 130 size range - with the finer screen material, only very small powder particles will fall through. I use mostly 110 - it works for me with both powder sifting and enamel printing. For very detailed work with enamels, much finer screens can be used - the 200 range. I have a gallery online if you're interested. http://www.tedbachglass.com

By the way - I love your work and your fearless pursuit of glass. I figure that a day without a mistake is a day without learning, so I am trying to become more fearless - after all, it's just a piece of glass.

Buttercup
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Buttercup » Tue Mar 18, 2014 3:53 am

Havi, you may find your screen's thread count to be in metric, not threads per inch. That threw me right off for quite a while as the screen I bought only has a number on it. It doesn't say per square centimetre, which it turned out to be. Duh!!

Good luck with your new venture. Jen

Havi
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Havi » Tue Mar 18, 2014 4:32 pm

Many thanks to you both,
Jen and Ted
Mean while, I watched BE's lesson about powder screening.

I want to do as simple as possible. I shall copy of course your enlightening remarks.

But I am going simpley to see if my screen allows the powder to pass thru it . If so - then the whole thing is simple and easy.

And if not

I shall have to find another compromise. My idea is to use any tools I have to create a better piece of art, not to work with tools for the sake of working with them.
I'll see.

Anyway,
Thanks a lot

Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

S.TImmerman
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby S.TImmerman » Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:40 am

Bullseye has at least 3 videos in their online teaching system about silkscreen.
i believe its 35.00 a year. They add new videos each month and you're able to view all the older ones. They posted a powder screening video 2 months ago. You can also ask questions about said videos via their blog.
Great stuff!
Shereen


http://www.bullseyeglass.com/all-methods.html

Mary Kay Nitchie
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Mary Kay Nitchie » Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:17 pm

Hi Havi,

If you have a subscription to Bullseye's videos, here is a non-emulsion method to prepare your screen:

Screenprinting on glass with hand-cut stencils:
http://www.bullseyeglass.com/forum/inde ... =14&t=4024

Best of luck!

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.
http://www.bullseyeglass.com

beninfl
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby beninfl » Wed Mar 19, 2014 3:42 pm

It bothers me that Bullseye charges for this. Not really a particularly wonderful way to support the people who buy their glass, to charge them to see how to use it. I wish Bullseye would reconsider that. No other manufacturer I can think of charges you for ideas on using their products.

Stephen Richard
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Stephen Richard » Wed Mar 19, 2014 4:25 pm

beninfl wrote:It bothers me that Bullseye charges for this. Not really a particularly wonderful way to support the people who buy their glass, to charge them to see how to use it. I wish Bullseye would reconsider that. No other manufacturer I can think of charges you for ideas on using their products.

I find the above statement breathtaking in its misunderstanding .
It is possible to discover how to use fusing glass from many sources. You don't have to pay if you don't want to.
The effort Bullseye put into research and education benefits the whole glass community
Approximately $3 per month is a small sum
Bullseye deserve some return for the effort of producing the videos, they are not a philanthropic organisation.
Education is not free. Think how much you pay for classes and courses.
No other fusing glass manufacturer does this kind of support.

There are many other comments that could be made, but this gives my initial thoughts
Steve Richard
You can view my Blog at: http://verrier-glass.blogspot.com/

Havi
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Havi » Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:00 pm

Thanks Mary Kay,
As a subscriber to your educational video's I actually saw this video yesterday, and it illuminated my way. I shall watch also the recommended video's concerning pigments that are there.

For the benefit of those who are following this thread, and for the sake of 'honesty' [I am also a librarian] I must mention that in Brad's new book there is a whole chapter dealing with screening etc. There are also other books dealing with various other methods of printing on glass. [- and if you want the book, you have to pay for it, I guess :wink: - ]

Many thanks,
I just need to if my screen can really pass the powder , or the other way round can the powder go thru my screen.

Good night to you all,
and thank you for being there for me,

Havi
Wish me luck in painting an image on the screen..............
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

Bert Weiss
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Re: Silk screen, powders.... enamels etc.

Postby Bert Weiss » Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:03 am

Havi, you can use the same media used for painting with powders, but mix the ink to a thicker consistency. There are advantages and disadvantages in using either oil based media or water miscible media. The standard oil based medium from decades past is no longer manufactured the same and the new one isn't as good to work with. It is known for holding the most pigment. When working with a water miscible medium, you want a slow to dry one, so it doesn't clog up your screen. You can slow drying by adding some glycerine. (here in the USA, you can purchase a small bottle of glycerine, for a reasonable price, at the Walmart pharmacy). One downside to the water based medium is that it can make soap bubbles as you work the squeegee back and forth.

You want to size the screen mesh relative to the powder particle size. When using onglaze colors which are finely ground, you can use a tight weave screen. When using Bullesye frits, you need a more open screen. I can't quote mesh sizes. I would consult with the frit manufacturer to get their recommended sizes.
Bert

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