Compressor recommendations? - WarmGlass.com

Compressor recommendations?

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Valerie Adams
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Compressor recommendations?

Postby Valerie Adams » Thu May 29, 2014 11:39 pm

I've just purchased a sandblaster and feel like I'm in Compressor Hell.

Here's the unit I've purchased:
http://www.rayzist.com/store/Sandcarvin ... 034vxa.php

And here's the compressor that's recommended by Rayzist:
http://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAI ... ssor-4YN50

And here's my confusion: everyone I talk to tells me to buy the largest compressor I can, BUT I've only got 110v, which limits the compressors I can get.

I don't expect to be doing a ton of blasting, as I've never owned a sandblaster before and don't really know what I'll be doing. But I'd like to have the option to do some glass carving rather than just blast off devit or take the shine off my pieces. I don't want to purchase a Sears or Harbor Freight brand, since I'd rather buy one that'll last rather than save money now and have to replace it in a couple years. I've got a Grainger store close by so if that compressor will work, I can pick it up.

Any help would be appreciated as this thing has been sitting in my studio for nearly a month, mocking me. :(

charlie
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby charlie » Fri May 30, 2014 12:03 am

15amps means you need a 20 amp circuit. 5.5 cfm isn't very much, and whilst it can be used, you're going to have to wait as it recharges. speedair has a very good reputation from long ago, but i don't know what it is in recent times.

Brad Walker
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Brad Walker » Fri May 30, 2014 8:14 am

Valerie Adams wrote:And here's my confusion: everyone I talk to tells me to buy the largest compressor I can, BUT I've only got 110v, which limits the compressors I can get.

I don't expect to be doing a ton of blasting, as I've never owned a sandblaster before and don't really know what I'll be doing. But I'd like to have the option to do some glass carving rather than just blast off devit or take the shine off my pieces. I don't want to purchase a Sears or Harbor Freight brand, since I'd rather buy one that'll last rather than save money now and have to replace it in a couple years. I've got a Grainger store close by so if that compressor will work, I can pick it up.


If you only have 110v available, then the largest compressor you can buy will only generate 5 to 6 cfm. This is adequate for surface blasting, but you'll still need to stop every 15 minutes or so for the tank to refill. (Not as big an issue as it sounds, because 15 minutes is generally long enough to do the surface work.)

However, if you want to do real carving, then you will sooner or later have to bite the bullet and get a compressor that requires 220v.

Rick Wilton
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Rick Wilton » Fri May 30, 2014 11:56 am

I DON'T GET IT!!!!!!

The manufacturer says this will work yet know one seems to believe them.

I have been blasting almost everyday for between 1-5 hours with a similar set-up for 10 years with the same 110v compressor. I have never had to wait for my compressor to catch up, I blast at up to 70 lbs psi and my cheap compressor from home depot that runs on 110v plugged into a 15amp breaker hums along just fine.

I get the idea of having the biggest best tool but why buy a Ferrari if you are only going to drive in playground zones.

Sandblasting with a pressure pot and the nozzle size we use is NOT that hard on a compressor. If you are using air tools all day long YES get a 60 gallon compressor and even a two stage.
Rick Wilton

Brad Walker
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Brad Walker » Fri May 30, 2014 12:19 pm

If you have a pressure pot system, you can use a 110v compressor and do carving.

If you have a siphon system, which is what I have, you need a larger compressor. I use my compressor to do lots of things other than sandblasting.

Rick Wilton
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Rick Wilton » Fri May 30, 2014 12:55 pm

Brad,

I do also use my compressor for everything from painting, using air tools on my vehicles and even grinding and polishing glass with an pneumatic sanders. We even used it to make a snow making machine one year.

I will admit that my compressor doesn't keep up 100% for air sanding, as it does slow down a bit as it can't keep up with 90 psi for long. Yet this is after 10 years of almost constant daily use. It was better 10 years ago.

My "issue" is with the advice I see here from time to time that you need a 60-80 gallon 2 stage compressor that costs a few thousand dollars so someone can remove some devit from a piece once a month. When the reality is much different.

This is my compressor Image

I abuse this thing, almost never change the oil or drain the tank, yet after ten years it only now starting to wear out and I use it daily.
Last edited by Rick Wilton on Fri May 30, 2014 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Rick Wilton

Rick Wilton
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Rick Wilton » Fri May 30, 2014 1:00 pm

Brad Walker wrote:If you have a pressure pot system, you can use a 110v compressor and do carving.

If you have a siphon system, which is what I have, you need a larger compressor. I use my compressor to do lots of things other than sandblasting.


I agree 100% is you are running a siphon system a larger compressor is recommended unless you are also just trying to remove devit and surface blast once and a while. A small compressor will suffice for a few minutes at a time.
Rick Wilton

Valerie Adams
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Valerie Adams » Fri May 30, 2014 5:05 pm

Thanks guys.

My system has a built-in pressure pot. Rick, can you tell me what model your compressor is? The one at Grainger is $735 but perhaps I can save a few bucks if I shop around...

Rick Wilton
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Rick Wilton » Fri May 30, 2014 5:41 pm

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Powermate-30 ... 636577-_-N

http://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-30-Ga ... 5yc1vZc27p

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-30-Gal ... 063473-_-N

Any of these from Home depot will work fine. All are under $500.00 and will work they all have the same CFM ratings as the one you posted.

5.5 CFM @ 90 psi.

This is plenty of air to handle your cabinet.

Good Luck
Rick Wilton

Rick Wilton
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Rick Wilton » Fri May 30, 2014 5:43 pm

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Porter-Cable ... /203653368

This one is similar to the one I have but not exactly.
Rick Wilton

Tony Smith
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Tony Smith » Fri May 30, 2014 8:21 pm

Rick,

You're right on the money. With a pressure pot, you can get away with a much smaller compressor and never outgrow it.

What you'll want is a 20 or 30 gallon tank so the compressor doesn't run constantly.
Perhaps a Craftsman like this. http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-33-g ... ockType=G1
Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Valerie Adams
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Valerie Adams » Fri May 30, 2014 8:46 pm

OK, I'm ready to buy!

How about this one?
http://www.sears.com/craftsman-professi ... 916474000P

Rick Wilton
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Rick Wilton » Fri May 30, 2014 10:11 pm

looks good to me.
Rick Wilton

Greg Rawls
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Greg Rawls » Sat May 31, 2014 7:53 am

I've got a siphon and am considering buying a pressure pot. Which pressure pots are ya'll using? Any special issues?
Greg

Geo
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Geo » Sat May 31, 2014 9:15 am

I'm curious about using compressed air to help separate 2 part molds, and for general use in a kiln-casting studio. How do teaching facilities supply compressed air into their work spaces?

Tony Smith
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Tony Smith » Sat May 31, 2014 10:18 am

Valerie Adams wrote:OK, I'm ready to buy!

How about this one?
http://www.sears.com/craftsman-professi ... 916474000P


Great choice. Belt drive, oiled compressor... And 7.2 CFM at 40 psi. I usually run my pressure pot at 20-25 psi, so that's plenty of air. Use the shortest hose you can get away with. A 25 ft long hose is much better than 100 ft with 75 ft coiled on the floor.

Good luck with it.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Tony Smith
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Tony Smith » Sat May 31, 2014 10:37 am

Greg Rawls wrote:I've got a siphon and am considering buying a pressure pot. Which pressure pots are ya'll using? Any special issues?


Greg,

The most common pressure pot among glass artists is the 100B-S sold by Glastar. It costs less than $1,000 and is pretty much plug and play out of the box. http://www.glastar.com/catalog/sandblas ... asters.cfm

Cyclone makes one that is a couple hundred dollars cheaper and works as well as the Glastar. The footswitch valve is a bit different. http://www.hisglassworks.com/cart/Cyclo ... 4ncodq9KK0

Rayzist sells their own pressure pot and it's a bit over $1,000. I haven't seen this unit, so I can't comment. http://www.rayzist.com/store/Sandcarvin ... pot-pp100x

There are others out there like those from Harbor Freight that cost around $100 and come without a footswitch and have a clumsy hand control.

I hope this helps.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

suds
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby suds » Sat May 31, 2014 12:02 pm

Geo wrote:I'm curious about using compressed air to help separate 2 part molds, and for general use in a kiln-casting studio. How do teaching facilities supply compressed air into their work spaces?


You put the compressor in a happy spot where there's electricity and hopefully some walls around it to deaden noise. Then plumb the air to all your workstations with copper or steel pipe. (Never use PVC pipe for air lines.)
A quick-disconnect fitting at each station so you can plug a hose into it and you're good to go.
Steve

Jerrwel
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Re: Compressor recommendations?

Postby Jerrwel » Sat May 31, 2014 1:05 pm

There are some questions this thread raises for me:
    Why is 220V not a readily available alternative here? For all the money that's being spent on equipment, is an electrical upgrade to 220V in order to maximize the investment possible? I upgraded my primary service and ran a 220V line for <$2000 with 2-3 additional 220V outlets still possible. Is the available service already maxed out?
      Is it possible to use a selector switch on a 220V line? My clothes dryer backs up to my shop wall; can I use a selector switch to make that service available to my shop when not using the dryer?
        How is blasting medium reclaimed when using a pressure pot? If the medium is not reclaimed and filtered, seems to me that the cost of the medium would rapidly exceed the cost of a full blasting cabinet installation. Space availability and cost are big concerns for me so the pressure pot would be the most attractive alternative considering those issues.
          What are the safety considerations when using a pressure pot? Using a respirator is probably only the start.
            Is it recommended to wear long-sleeved clothing +/or gloves when using a blasting cabinet? Wonder about MERS, MRSA and god-knows what other contaminations that could lurk in rubberized sleeve materials used in some cabinets. I'm not a germaphobe just thinking realistically especially as I rent time on the sand blaster at a glass store.
              Is renting time on a blasting installation an alternative? As mentioned above, I rent time locally but my need is sporadic. Renting time to others could help cover costs but I don't like other people using my equipment.
                What about noise? The installation I rent is very loud; insulating the compressor and filtering system or having a unit that can be 'charged' when I am not in the shop would be a big plus.
                Jerry

                Rick Wilton
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                Re: Compressor recommendations?

                Postby Rick Wilton » Sat May 31, 2014 7:56 pm

                Greg Rawls wrote:I've got a siphon and am considering buying a pressure pot. Which pressure pots are ya'll using? Any special issues?


                Greg,

                I use two cheap pressure pots (like HF pots) and have added foot switch devices to them. I used a regular ball valve to turn the blast line on and off for ten years before I bothered with the foot switch.

                I personally don't see the advantages of the expensive pots, they are a pretty basic piece of equipment. You add abrasive and pressurized air and it sprays out the hose. Not sure what the expensive ones may add to the equation other than the foot switch already added. You definitely don't want to use the "deadman switch" (if your pot comes with one') as it is too long and hard on the hand.

                HF has pressure pots from $60 - $150.00 and you can add a foot switch for under $300
                Rick Wilton


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