cloth "molds" - WarmGlass.com

cloth "molds"

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Vonon
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 6:32 pm
Location: East Tennessee

cloth "molds"

Postby Vonon » Thu Dec 18, 2014 7:55 pm

Has anyone used the cloth style texture product (think lava cloth) to add a texture to the back side of a piece. A friend said the lava cloth stuck to her piece but I notice they have several different, less pronounced textures now. Seems like if you don't need a smooth back, this would be good for a separator that just lives on the kiln shelf for many firings. http://www.fusedglasswarehouse.com/Clot ... s_c106.htm Is this like the textured version of the ever elusive needs-no-kilnwash shelf?
Vonon

Bert Weiss
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Re: cloth "molds"

Postby Bert Weiss » Thu Dec 18, 2014 9:18 pm

I once used a lava cloth as the bottom mold for a desktop I cast. When it was done, it looked like somebody had streaked the glass with dirty fingers, only these streaks could not be cleaned off. They were created with I rubbed my hand over the cloth before setting the glass on it. So, I scrapped the piece and did it over with a different bottom texture. I gave the bad piece to my friend, a cabinet maker whose job this was from. He "planted' the piece in the ground outside his shop. A year or two later, I looked at the piece and saw that the streaks were gone. They had been cleaned off by acid rain. This tells me that maybe muriatic acid might have cleaned the piece up from the get go.

That said, there are different manufacturers of silica cloth. I don't think they all behave the same. I use 1/4" fiber blanket for all kinds of molds in my work. I like it best.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
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S.TImmerman
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Re: cloth "molds"

Postby S.TImmerman » Fri Dec 19, 2014 3:26 am

I have some lava cloth and have used it make nice designs in glass. The ceramic lava cloth worked well for me, I wonder if it was different than the cloth you bought. I'll take a photo of the glass and post it.
Shereen

Marty
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Re: cloth "molds"

Postby Marty » Fri Dec 19, 2014 11:35 am

I love the copy- "Add unique textures to your work! GlassTextiles is great for dressing up the back of pieces for a more finished and professional look."

I tried it once, it's a really ugly thing to do to glass.

JestersBaubles
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Re: cloth "molds"

Postby JestersBaubles » Fri Dec 19, 2014 12:24 pm

If you are looking for ways to add texture to the back of your glass, you might want to look at Paul Tarlow's ebook, "Beautiful bowl backs". There are some nice, simple, ideas for adding interest to your pieces.

Dana W.

Vonon
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 6:32 pm
Location: East Tennessee

Re: cloth "molds"

Postby Vonon » Fri Dec 19, 2014 4:37 pm

Thank you all for the input. I may try one of the low profile styles and see if I prefer it to thinfire or my kilnwash jobs. Marty - enjoyed your comment. Dana - Great reference. I'm actually more interested in being able to leave a separator in place with the texture being a secondary consideration.
Vonon

CCVICKERS
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Re: cloth "molds"

Postby CCVICKERS » Sat Dec 20, 2014 10:58 am

Vonon,

A dear friend asked me to flatten a large number of wine bottles for a project. I wanted to do this fast and inexpensive. I'd read that lava cloth would last about 10 firings, maybe more depending on handling and top temperature. If true, that would make lava cloth about as costly as shelf paper for me. I took a chance and purchased silica fabric refractory weld blanket (Refrasil). It cost about $25 dollars for a 33"x36" piece. The piece came to me loosely folded and had a few flaws in the surface - 2 threads were pulled. These imperfections haven't been a problem. The texture is small and shallow. The cut edges fray easily, but his can be minimized by cutting on a slight angle. I didn't stay with the kiln during firing, but the times I checked it I didn't notice any fumes or burn-off gas. Not being familiar with the product, I still stayed out of the room.

I cut a 15"x15" piece and gave it a try. My top temp is 1475F for 10 minutes. I think each complete cycle has been around 8-9 hours. I've gotten 15 firings into this piece and it still looks and feels like the unfired cloth - you can tell a difference, but it's difficult. I've handled the cloth several times between firings. I still have 3 more usable pieces. The texture is fine and even. The glass slides off the cloth. I found this process/texture faster, more pleasing to look at, and less expensive than the alternatives for THIS type of project.
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Bert Weiss
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Re: cloth "molds"

Postby Bert Weiss » Sat Dec 20, 2014 12:50 pm

CCVICKERS wrote:Vonon,

A dear friend asked me to flatten a large number of wine bottles for a project. I wanted to do this fast and inexpensive. I'd read that lava cloth would last about 10 firings, maybe more depending on handling and top temperature. If true, that would make lava cloth about as costly as shelf paper for me. I took a chance and purchased silica fabric refractory weld blanket (Refrasil). It cost about $25 dollars for a 33"x36" piece. The piece came to me loosely folded and had a few flaws in the surface - 2 threads were pulled. These imperfections haven't been a problem. The texture is small and shallow. The cut edges fray easily, but his can be minimized by cutting on a slight angle. I didn't stay with the kiln during firing, but the times I checked it I didn't notice any fumes or burn-off gas. Not being familiar with the product, I still stayed out of the room.

I cut a 15"x15" piece and gave it a try. My top temp is 1475F for 10 minutes. I think each complete cycle has been around 8-9 hours. I've gotten 15 firings into this piece and it still looks and feels like the unfired cloth - you can tell a difference, but it's difficult. I've handled the cloth several times between firings. I still have 3 more usable pieces. The texture is fine and even. The glass slides off the cloth. I found this process/texture faster, more pleasing to look at, and less expensive than the alternatives for THIS type of project.
CC, it is hard to argue with success. I warn people that all silica cloths are not created equal. Refrasil is a name brand. There are knock offs out there.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

CCVICKERS
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2014 12:06 pm

Re: cloth "molds"

Postby CCVICKERS » Sat Dec 20, 2014 1:26 pm

That is why I held my breath for the entire first cycle the first time I used it! :shock:

Thank you for making that important distinction. I used the branded Refrasil.

Vonon
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 6:32 pm
Location: East Tennessee

Re: cloth "molds"

Postby Vonon » Sat Dec 20, 2014 5:00 pm

CC, The results you got look quite nice and I must say the texture adds a nice element to the bottle project. I will give it a try. And, Bert, I'm with you on trusting brand names. Thank you for additional testimony and photos. Very helpful.
Vonon


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