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Tiny hole

Posted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:34 pm
by Aglassygirl303
Argh, gorgeous piece. 15 x 15". Perfect, other that a very tiny hole. Any suggestions on repairing and re fusing. The hole is 1/8" x 1/4". This piece is a high low surface. It is a cracked glass piece that is two layers but on a single layer section it has small dot enhancements and the hole is next to the dot. I am think of either filling the hole with same color frit powder or putting a small piece of same color glass and refiring it.

When re fire ing should I use the same full fuse schedule or a fir polish. I don't want to risk ruiningg this piece.

Re: Tiny hole

Posted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 5:24 pm
by Morganica
Pictures?

Re: Tiny hole

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:14 am
by Aglassygirl303
I can not ever post a picture. For an unknown reason. But I filled the tiny hole with matching fine frit and added a similare design element. It was successful and place in the CoOp Gallery for sale.

Re: Tiny hole

Posted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 3:48 am
by Judith Andre
You will need to go to a full fuse again. If possible, I would add a design element to cover it as, in my experience, patches always show.

Re: Tiny hole

Posted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 5:59 pm
by Jerrwel
Aglassygirl303 wrote:Argh, gorgeous piece. 15 x 15". Perfect, other that a very tiny hole. Any suggestions on repairing and re fusing. The hole is 1/8" x 1/4". This piece is a high low surface. It is a cracked glass piece that is two layers but on a single layer section it has small dot enhancements and the hole is next to the dot. I am think of either filling the hole with same color frit powder or putting a small piece of same color glass and refiring it.

When re fire ing should I use the same full fuse schedule or a fir polish. I don't want to risk ruiningg this piece.


With the 'single layer section' mentioned, my guess would be that the firing temp was too high and the single layer glass contracted toward a design element and cratered. I work with single layers often and never fire into the 'full fuse' range when doing so to avoid glass contraction (the 1/4 inch rule). Joy of Fusing by Randy and Carole Wardell and Firing Schedules for Glass/The Kiln Companion by Graham Stonehttp://www.warmglass.org/books/books/126-fsg both have salient information for single layer/and uneven thermal mass projects. As suggested in Stone's book, firing and annealing this uneven construction is far more complex than meets the eye.