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Dictionary

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Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Dictionary

Postby Lauri Levanto » Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:36 am

There seems to be interest in compiling a dictionary.
This thread is for contributions and comments.

I promise to the housekeeping, to pick the
items from here,adding to a text file in alphabetic order.
When some definitons have arrived, I'll post
the current state of the dictionary.

* * *
*Alumina* Aluminium oxide Al2O3, used as a separating compound in kilnwash and some mold receipes.

*Alumina anhydrate* ?

*MOld* a shape made of heat resistant material. The glass when slumped or casted takes the forn of the mold surface.

*Separator* a compond that prevents the glass reacting (sticking to) a mols or kiln shelf.

* * *
Who takes the next turn?

-lauri

Peg
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Location: Bristol, UK

Re: Dictionary

Postby Peg » Fri Feb 20, 2004 8:42 am

lauri wrote:
*MOld* a shape made of heat resistant material. The glass when slumped or casted takes the forn of the mold surface.
-lauri


That would be 'mould' in the UK - are we going for a multilingual dictionary?

Bert Weiss
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Re: Dictionary

Postby Bert Weiss » Fri Feb 20, 2004 9:27 am

lauri wrote:There seems to be interest in compiling a dictionary.
This thread is for contributions and comments.

I promise to the housekeeping, to pick the
items from here,adding to a text file in alphabetic order.
When some definitons have arrived, I'll post
the current state of the dictionary.

* * *
*Alumina* Aluminium oxide Al2O3, used as a separating compound in kilnwash and some mold receipes.

*Alumina anhydrate* ?

*MOld* a shape made of heat resistant material. The glass when slumped or casted takes the forn of the mold surface.

*Separator* a compond that prevents the glass reacting (sticking to) a mols or kiln shelf.

* * *
Who takes the next turn?

-lauri


Lauri

In my experience in the USA Alumina refers to Flour of Alumina Hydrate. I believe that alumina oxide is different.

Frit: particles of crushed glass
flux: an agent that forms clear glass, generally at a relatively low temp. Examples borax, spray A.
enamels: a mixture of flux and metallic oxides, when mixed with a binder and medium, becones applicable to glass or ceramic.
medium: a liquid that carries enamel.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
http://www.customartglass.com
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Alecia Helton
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Location: outside of Dallas TX

Postby Alecia Helton » Fri Feb 20, 2004 12:12 pm

Cabochon or Cab -- non-facted stone or piece of fused glass used in jewelry


In an early topic on a similar topic, Geri Comstack offered to compile a list of jewelry terms. You might want to contact her.


Alecia
Alecia Helton
Wear Original Wonders!
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GatorGirl
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Jan 21, 2004 4:14 pm
Location: Germany

Postby GatorGirl » Fri Feb 20, 2004 12:31 pm

Lauri,
I think that it is a fantastic idea! An international dictionary!
Kim
PS-If you need a German translator I can try to help out.

Hugo Gavarini
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Location: Patagonia Argentina

Frit or Grain?

Postby Hugo Gavarini » Sat Feb 21, 2004 12:18 am

This would be time to discuss the term "frit". That word came from the French "fritté" and corresponds to a batch which was melted and cooled before fining, then crushed.

I believe that material was produced for centuries by glassmakers who kept secret formulas and who had enough money and power to build and operate wood or coal fed furnaces.

So, frit could be a raw material for glassblowers who had to re-melt, fine and work that product.

That's why I prefer GRAIN for crushed glass and not FRIT.

Any thoughts?
Hugo

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Postby Lauri Levanto » Sat Feb 21, 2004 4:13 pm

I knw this will happen.
It takes time to achieve a concensus of terms.

Hugo: Grains are a better term but the industry is using frit.
I suggest we take it.

Peg: It will be a multiligual one. I can provide
Finnish and some Swedish.

It will be in internet form, hyperlinks to associated topics.

* * *
Bubble: Ait trapped within the glass, In UK English seed.
Bulge: air trapped under the glass deforming it.

-lauri

acrawford
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Postby acrawford » Sat Feb 21, 2004 11:42 pm

I am here in the NW where BullsEye and Pilchuk lead the way or are at least high profile. I am for going with terminology as they use it unless there are really good reasons not to. In part because BE has a catalog in which they use these many of these terms. As in "frit", which I believe is widely understood to be crushed glass in various degrees of crushedness. "Seed" in the UK and other such could easily be incorporated as in "see frit". I am unaware of other current written info which varies much from BE. I think that this is a wonderful idea. I have seen lots of posts here asking about terminology. It would answer so many of those questions and could be expanded upon over time. Congratulations! Ailsa

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Dictionary, draft 1

Postby Lauri Levanto » Sun Feb 22, 2004 4:41 am

Last night I stated it as an Excel sheet.
It has no spelling checker, so typos will be coorected later.
For grammar and syntax mistakes I ask for comments.
Excel wraps the lines differently, apologies for hard reading
-lauri
*****************
Warm Glass Dictionary
"Warm Glass is a process where a glass object is formed in a kiln or by lampwork.
The low end is clear. Cutting and grinding as well as soldering are called cold working, though sometimes a warm glass work involves a great amount of these. The upper end is a bit harder to define. Glass blowing is called hot glass but some casting processes are quite similar in both. A borderline case is when a pattered warm glass element is included in a bown product."

Alumina in the USA Alumina refers to Flour of Alumina Hydrate. Can be used like Aluminium oxide
Aluminium oxide Usually used as a fine powder. It acts as separator in many kilnwash receipes.It can be also used as abrasive in sandblasting and grinding.
Annealing cooling a glass piece so slowly that the internal thrmal stresses a relieved.
Annealing point see annealing range
Annealing range "A temperature zone where the glass is so stiff it keeps the external form
but so fluid that molecular movement allows internal stresses to resolve..
As glass has no definitive melting point the limits of the annealing range are a bit arbitary. The term annealing point refers to upper limit, Bullseye gives it a value of 960 F (=516 C).
The lower end is called Strain Point. At this temperature the glass is so hard that a clear risk of thermal shock exists."
Bevel A slanted edge ground to a glass.
Cab see cabochon
Cabochon non-facted stone or piece of fused glass used in jewelry
Devit "Result of devitrification. When glass is made the chrystalline ingredients are vitrified,melted to a
liquid form. Devit is reverse of this process when chrystals form to the
surface of glass. Devit can be prevented or reduced by using oversprays."
Devitrification see Devit
English German Explanation
Fiber paper "paperlike material made of ceramic fibers. It is used to prevent glass from
sticking to kiln shelf."
Flux Fluss "When glass is formed, soda melts first forming a flux that dissolves the
chrystals of the other ingredients. Fluxes reduce the melting point of glass.
The term is also usedfor oversprays. Lead and borax are strong fluxes
Fluxes may react with mould or kilnwash.causing sticking. Some fluxes
also evaporate slightly corroding the kiln elements, especially in casting where hot glass is kept in a kiln over prologed time."
Heat "When a material is heated, the thermal energy appears amovement of atoms.
This is seen as thermal expansion and futhrt heating as melting."
Kilnwash A paintlike material used on kilnshelves and moulds to prevent the glass stickin.
Separator " a compond that prevents the glass reacting (sticking to) a mould
or kiln shelf. See Kilnwash"

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Postby Lauri Levanto » Tue Feb 24, 2004 10:09 am

How soon the enthusiasm faded!

I have not seen any comments/contributions.
Please do something.

Does Geri have stuff about jevelry terms?

What kind of meanings does Flashing have?
-lauri

Bert Weiss
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Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 12:06 am
Location: Chatham NH
Contact:

Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Feb 24, 2004 11:38 am

lauri wrote:How soon the enthusiasm faded!

I have not seen any comments/contributions.
Please do something.

Does Geri have stuff about jevelry terms?

What kind of meanings does Flashing have?
-lauri


Flashed glass is a glass with a thin layer of intense color over a base glass that is clear or colored. Traditionally this ihas been hand blown glass. It is now possible to make "flashed glass" using frits or enamels that are applied and fired in.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Postby Lauri Levanto » Tue Feb 24, 2004 3:35 pm

Thanks Bert.

Isn't there flash cooling?
Anything else?

-lauri

Geri Comstock
Posts: 340
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Location: Northern CA
Contact:

Postby Geri Comstock » Tue Feb 24, 2004 4:19 pm

lauri wrote:How soon the enthusiasm faded!

I have not seen any comments/contributions.
Please do something.

Does Geri have stuff about jevelry terms?

What kind of meanings does Flashing have?
-lauri



Do you have some specific jewelry terms that you'd like defined?

Here's a few:

Bead - A stone, piece of glass, etc. that has a hole in it, so that it can be strung on silk, wire, leather, etc.

Bezel - The metal that is used around a cabochon to hold it in place. The bezel is bent slightly around the cabochon, which is what holds the cabochon in place

Cabochon - a piece of stone, glass, etc, that hasn't been faceted and is used in jewelry making

Fine silver - 99.9% pure silver; generally not used for large pieces in jewelry because it's very soft; many jewelers use fine silver bezel wire for setting stones in silver pieces

Sterling silver - a mixture of 92.5% silver and 7.5% other material (usually copper). Sterling is generally used for larger jewelry because of the hardness that the copper adds to it



If you have some other terms you want defined, or if these definitions aren't clear, let me know and I'll rewrite them.

Best -

Geri

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Thanks geri

Postby Lauri Levanto » Wed Feb 25, 2004 1:30 pm

As I am compiling the WG dictionary
all terms are welcome.

I have seen some strange terms to refer
the fastening the jevelry to clothes ears etc.
-lauri

Geri Comstock
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Postby Geri Comstock » Wed Feb 25, 2004 1:41 pm

Hmmm...I'm trying to think of the terms you've mentioned, but can't think of any at the moment.

Here's some more i can think of off the top of my head that many people don't seem to know:

torque - a solid piece of metal, worn around the neck. Sometimes it's worn alone, sometimes it's used to suspend a pendant as a substitute for a chain. Some people call them neck rings.

ear nuts - the little metal devices used to hold pierced post earrings onto the ear

bale - the device used to suspend a pendant from a chain

If you think of the others, let me know and I'll come up with a definition.

Geri

lissa
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Postby lissa » Wed Feb 25, 2004 2:56 pm

chad
slump/bend
coldwork
tack fuse
COE
thermal shock
compatibility
pattern bar
confetti
wafer
stringer
drop ring
pot melt
thinfire
lapwheel
WBS

That's just what pops into my head right away, seems like this could be a nearly endless list if one was to really sit down and compile terms.

lissa.

Bev Brandt
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Location: St. Louis, MO
Contact:

Postby Bev Brandt » Wed Feb 25, 2004 3:11 pm

Since I came to kilnformed glass from other glass work, I don't have a clue what some of the pottery terms mean. Such as:

slip
bisque firing and related temp
cones and related temp
I also don't know raku clay from the brown clay I can buy at the art supply store from playdough and wish I did.

I want to make my own molds eventually and when the time comes, I will take a pottery class. But in the mean time, perhaps a section of the dictionary can be a "clay terms for dummies."

I came across a hot glass glossary the other day that had photographs of some of the items. Now *that's* ambitious! (Not that I'm recommending it...)

- Bev
Bev Brandt

SEMueller
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Location: Arlington, TX
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Postby SEMueller » Wed Feb 25, 2004 3:35 pm

I know there were some terms in the magless how to that I wanted/and or needed to look up additional info, like photoresist, sandblasting (they were using something other than sand I believe), you could include potmelt, inclusion, and I can probably think up some others as I look through other posts...

I think this is a really awesome idea! Kudos to you
Suzanne

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Thanks

Postby Lauri Levanto » Thu Feb 26, 2004 5:13 am

SEMueller, Bec, Lissa , Geri.

After entering today's harvest
the dictionary has 100+ entries.

It is time soon to consider in which form we can
include it into the board.

No photos maybe, but I would like to add some drawings.

-lauri

Lauri Levanto
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 7:33 am
Location: Halikko, Finland

Who knows??

Postby Lauri Levanto » Thu Mar 04, 2004 4:31 pm

?bail
?Catcher
?Chad
?Cloisonne

can you help with these terms. all are new to me

-lauri


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