Etching Cream Question - WarmGlass.com

Etching Cream Question

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Denise S
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Etching Cream Question

Postby Denise S » Sat Feb 28, 2004 11:19 am

I'm trying to create a pendant with dichro in a middle layer and etched designs on the clear top layer. What I'm thinking of doing is putting the etching cream in a squeeze tube and drawing the design on the glass, then etching. I want a nice, opaque look to the etch, but my last attempts with etching cream ( a while ago) were not what I wanted - not opaque enough. Maybe I didn't leave it on long enough?

Anyone tried this? I haven't got the squeeze bottle yet, but I thought I'd ask the board first. Don't bother suggesting sandblasting, it's way out of my budget :cry:

Thanks, in advance!!

Tony Smith
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Postby Tony Smith » Sun Feb 29, 2004 12:44 am

I've used the Armour Etch product on CBS dichroic on System 96 as well as the System 96 irids with satisfactory results. I leave it on for a couple of minutes and have gotten a uniform etch of the dichroic coating and a solid translucent etch underneath. I've also heard from people who have had mixed results... especially with irids. There are a number of variables not the least of which is the glass, but also the type of coating, temperature and strength of the etching solution... some of which are beyond your control. The only things you can control are time of application, number of repeats and temperature (use at room temperature). If you don't like the look, dry the piece and reapply... it's a good reason to use a resist for a stencil on your glass.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Lynn g
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Postby Lynn g » Sun Feb 29, 2004 1:27 am

You might look into the new Sand Etch kit from Armour. It's a small blast set-up using canned compressed air and recyclable grit. I saw it at Michael's for $69.95 and used their 50%-off coupon so got it for $35. Haven't tried it yet, but a friend of mine has and likes it.
Lynn g
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Tony Smith
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Postby Tony Smith » Sun Feb 29, 2004 1:37 am

Don't waste your money... I bought one to try and couldn't get through a half dozen maglesses before the can froze up... very frustrating to use.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Kitty
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Postby Kitty » Sun Feb 29, 2004 1:42 am

i think your etched motif will perhaps be lighter than you desire. i fully understand your thinking about not getting into sandblasting because of the money, but that other post here about the kit from Michael's might really be worth looking into.

alternatively, you could try a substance for bottle frosting, and put your design on with that stuff, instead of etching it. the bottle frosting leaves the same kind of finish, i think, that you are looking for. Bert Weiss has posted the name of it here ... he tried it out. if i rummage around, i may have the name of it myself; if so, i'll get back to you.

Hey, i found the bit i was looking for: The product is frosted Organic Bottle Coating from Ferro in Washington PA.

Rebecca M.
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Postby Rebecca M. » Sun Feb 29, 2004 9:09 am

Tony Smith wrote:Don't waste your money... I bought one to try and couldn't get through a half dozen maglesses before the can froze up... very frustrating to use.

Tony


I second that. I thought the best part about it was the directions for making a blasting box out of cardboard. :roll:
If Tony was able to get through more than one piece without the can freezing up, he was doing way better than me.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Sun Feb 29, 2004 10:53 am

If opaque is really what you want, white organic bottle coating is the only solution I can think of. It bakes in at 400ºF. $100 minimum order with Ferro, though. Try white Pebeo or Deka.

If I were to work with a chemical etch I'd use the one from HIS Glassworks. It is a dip which requires a resist.
Bert

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Denise S
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Location: navarre, florida

Postby Denise S » Sun Feb 29, 2004 7:56 pm

Thanks for all the great ideas. I might look for the thing at Michael's, as I'd really like a sandblasted effect, if possible. The Etch All was a waste of time- too light, just like you said, Kitty. I just wasted a bunch of time and some good glass experimenting. I don't know what anyone uses it for - I just ended up with a lot of glass that looked like devit.

Kitty
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Postby Kitty » Sun Feb 29, 2004 8:19 pm

Denise, if Tony says that thing from Michael's isnt any good, I'd be inclined to follow his advice. He knows a lot about blasting, from the cheapest to the most expensive. After reading his post, I think I'd be VERY inclined to listen to him. Maybe the Vari-Etch from HIS is the best idea, to be used with a resist/stencil. Good luck with your experiments to find a good solution. (PS -- the Vari-Etch will produce about the same finish as the etching cream, in my experience.) The craft paint called Porcelaine is worth a try. See if they have a "frost" or "parchment" type of white. The stuff is about $3 a bottle, at craft stores, and thru places like Dick Blick. It does not come off by scratching with your fingernail ... you bake it in the oven at 300F for awhile. If you're trying to get a white frost on the top layer of glass, with the dichro a layer down, this might be the best route -- at least, worth the $3 to try it.

Denise S
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Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 9:44 am
Location: navarre, florida

Postby Denise S » Mon Mar 01, 2004 8:43 am

Kitty, I think you're right about the $3 investment. I just hope it doesn't look like paint once it's baked. Worth a try, though.

Kitty
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Postby Kitty » Mon Mar 01, 2004 2:20 pm

it may look like paint. i've seen pendants that were made the way you describe your process, with the dichro in the middle layer, and the etching on the very top of the clear cap. but the successful ones i'm aware of are not etched with cream, they are blasted and then usually firepolished, but not always.

i'd like to hear how your experiment with the paint comes out, and whether it gives a good appearance, or not.

best regards,
kitty


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