Perfect white for fusing( Liquid Paper???) YES - WarmGlass.com

Perfect white for fusing( Liquid Paper???) YES

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dan001
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Location: Montreal

Perfect white for fusing( Liquid Paper???) YES

Postby dan001 » Wed Mar 03, 2004 3:41 pm

Yes,

We have tried White liquid paper between 2 pieces of glass. Fully fused the brightness and clarity are intact.

We actually use it to simulate a snow storm

If you are looking for adding some bright clear looking white to your fused piece, you have to try it to believe it. What is in Liquid paper that prevent it to evaporate or melt, I have no clue but I suspect that it might be Mica base.

Now let your imagination go and you will have tons of ideas




Dan
L&D Design

Stuart Clayman
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Postby Stuart Clayman » Wed Mar 03, 2004 3:52 pm

What happens if you use it on the top layer? Will it stay bright white? Ir does it yellow?
Kiln Repair by a Clayman kilnrepair@yahoo.com
Glassworks by a Clayman
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dan001
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Location: Montreal

Postby dan001 » Wed Mar 03, 2004 4:09 pm

Not tested,

I gues we should try

Dan

Kathie Karancz
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Postby Kathie Karancz » Wed Mar 03, 2004 4:27 pm

Hey Dan:
Thanks for letting us know that!!!! Love it.... now I have to go raid my office's stationery shelf. Tons there....
Kathie Karancz
Tribal Turtle
Victoria, British Columbia
http://www.tribalturtle.com

molly
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Postby molly » Wed Mar 03, 2004 4:48 pm

me too! I have some at home, but it is probably all dried out.

Tony Serviente
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Postby Tony Serviente » Wed Mar 03, 2004 5:24 pm

Wonder if they use zinc oxide. Anyone ever try the life guards friend in a kiln. (Mafia members need not respond.)

Dani
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Postby Dani » Wed Mar 03, 2004 7:15 pm

I had quite a trial finding zinc oxide locally when I was experimenting with silverpoint. A pharmacy finally found a jar in their basement! Sheesh. I haven't tried the Liquid Paper, but really thought I was onto something when I accidently fused some white and gold paint pen and it fused beautifully. Then I proceeded with a whole kiln-load that came out black and blotched and totally icky. So much for that brilliant idea. Hope the whiteout gives you more consistent results.

Kim Bellis
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Postby Kim Bellis » Thu Mar 04, 2004 10:34 am

Dani:
What is liquid white paper? I am assuming by the conversation it is a type of paper one can get at office depot?
thanks
Kim

dan001
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Location: Montreal

Postby dan001 » Thu Mar 04, 2004 11:23 am

The questions came to me more than once.

I guess their is another commecial name. White Liquid paper is the stuff that you can find at stationary store to erase a mistake made by typing. You apply this over your mistake and than re type on top and cannot see that you mess up.They use to sell them in small bottle, but my kids are now buying it for school in a Pen format, I know that they are also available in small tape as well.

The Commercial brand name that I used is Paper mateand the bottle is also called Correction fluid . It is apprarently made by Sandford, in Bellwood.Il 60104, a divison of Newell rubbermaid
thir si also a1-800-668-4575


Dan

Kim Bellis
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Postby Kim Bellis » Thu Mar 04, 2004 11:56 am

Dan:
Thank you for clarifying. I am going to put that on my "gotta try list"
thanks
Kim

Carla Fox
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Postby Carla Fox » Thu Mar 04, 2004 1:43 pm

Jewelers use white out lots to act as an "anti-flux"...to keep solder from flowing to areas we don't want soldered.

The fumes from this stuff are supposed to be toxic. It's not going to be the problem for glass people using in a kiln that it is for jeweler's who have their faces over the piece they are soldering, but venting is always a good idea.

Carla

lissa
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Postby lissa » Thu Mar 04, 2004 1:44 pm

White out.

lissa.

charlie
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Postby charlie » Thu Mar 04, 2004 2:11 pm

dan001 wrote:The questions came to me more than once.

I guess their is another commecial name. White Liquid paper is the stuff that you can find at stationary store to erase a mistake made by typing. You apply this over your mistake and than re type on top and cannot see that you mess up.They use to sell them in small bottle, but my kids are now buying it for school in a Pen format, I know that they are also available in small tape as well.

The Commercial brand name that I used is Paper mateand the bottle is also called Correction fluid . It is apprarently made by Sandford, in Bellwood.Il 60104, a divison of Newell rubbermaid
thir si also a1-800-668-4575


Dan


typing? mistakes? do you put it on the computer screen? :?: is it in the same aisle as buggy whips?

i don't get it.

dan001
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Location: Montreal

Postby dan001 » Thu Mar 04, 2004 2:23 pm

You see Charlie, I am old enough that computer did not exist when white liquid paper was invented.

If you want to use it on your computer screen, go right ahead but beware your hair might also start tuning white


Dan

Kathie Karancz
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Postby Kathie Karancz » Thu Mar 04, 2004 2:36 pm

OK guys: I just raided our stationery closet at work. I got Liquid Paper Dryline (with a free blue pen)..... 8) [-X I'm going to give it a try. shhhhhhhhhh
Kathie Karancz
Tribal Turtle
Victoria, British Columbia
http://www.tribalturtle.com

Patty Gray
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Postby Patty Gray » Thu Mar 04, 2004 2:57 pm

I was told that white out has some health warnings, that it might do something with the brain or nerves. Anyone know about this? We used white out and had great results on the surface of glass and even on the bottom. Since the warning of hazards with the use I stopped using it. Health/hazard warning??

Patty
http://www.pattygray.com

Terry Ow-Wing
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Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Thu Mar 04, 2004 3:32 pm

I thought the new white out these days has been reformulated so that it is no longer toxic??? :?
-Terry O.


CM Fox wrote:Jewelers use white out lots to act as an "anti-flux"...to keep solder from flowing to areas we don't want soldered.

The fumes from this stuff are supposed to be toxic. It's not going to be the problem for glass people using in a kiln that it is for jeweler's who have their faces over the piece they are soldering, but venting is always a good idea.

Carla
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
Image

Carla Fox
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Postby Carla Fox » Thu Mar 04, 2004 4:00 pm

Terry Ow-Wing wrote:I thought the new white out these days has been reformulated so that it is no longer toxic??? :?
-Terry O.


CM Fox wrote:Jewelers use white out lots to act as an "anti-flux"...to keep solder from flowing to areas we don't want soldered.

The fumes from this stuff are supposed to be toxic. It's not going to be the problem for glass people using in a kiln that it is for jeweler's who have their faces over the piece they are soldering, but venting is always a good idea.

Carla




Terry:
I've tried to figure this out. Half of what I find, sez toxic, the other half sez not toxic. White-Out comes in many brands and soluability. Go to Office Depot and stand & read the kinds. It may take some experimenting to find the kind that works best for glass.

And until someone tells us FOR SURE that it's not toxic I continue to use it but vent it away from my face (or kiln).

Hope this is helpful

Carla
jeweler mostly
glassy occasionally

Dani
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Postby Dani » Thu Mar 04, 2004 4:00 pm

charlie wrote:
dan001 wrote:The questions came to me more than once.

I guess their is another commecial name. White Liquid paper is the stuff that you can find at stationary store to erase a mistake made by typing. You apply this over your mistake and than re type on top and cannot see that you mess up.They use to sell them in small bottle, but my kids are now buying it for school in a Pen format, I know that they are also available in small tape as well.

The Commercial brand name that I used is Paper mateand the bottle is also called Correction fluid . It is apprarently made by Sandford, in Bellwood.Il 60104, a divison of Newell rubbermaid
thir si also a1-800-668-4575


Dan


typing? mistakes? do you put it on the computer screen? :?: is it in the same aisle as buggy whips?

i don't get it.


LOL. It's also used by artists who still draw by hand using pencils and inks.... to cover up a line they want changed. Then you make a copy of the goobered design and no one is the wiser.

Dani
Posts: 493
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Postby Dani » Thu Mar 04, 2004 4:05 pm

Patty Gray wrote:I was told that white out has some health warnings, that it might do something with the brain or nerves. Anyone know about this? We used white out and had great results on the surface of glass and even on the bottom. Since the warning of hazards with the use I stopped using it. Health/hazard warning??

Patty
http://www.pattygray.com


Interesting. I can see some creative potential.... stenciling white on colored glass and sandwiching under clear. Applying a thin overall coat, and scratching out with a needle to reveal the color below.... would look etched. Hmmm. What is in whiteout anyway? And how does the cost compare in quantity to a bag of white enamels?


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