Looking for small molds for firing - WarmGlass.com

Looking for small molds for firing

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candala
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Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2003 7:44 am

Looking for small molds for firing

Postby candala » Tue Apr 08, 2003 7:16 am

Hi, I have a 7 inch shelf, small kiln. Where can I find (other than Ebay) small molds of rectangles, hearts, etc. for me to put scrap in and fire in the kiln? Thanks.

Colin & Helen

Postby Colin & Helen » Tue Apr 08, 2003 9:30 am

Why not cut the shape out of fibre board.

Colin

candala
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2003 7:44 am

Postby candala » Tue Apr 08, 2003 9:46 am

Out of fiberboard? I want the depth as well, similar to a stainless steel mold. Thanks anyway.

Jackie Beckman
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Postby Jackie Beckman » Tue Apr 08, 2003 9:57 am

Gil is selling some small molds at Fusion HQ - I saw them at my local distributor, and I'm sure you can get them on his site. He's a sponsor of the board, just click on his link above

KatyPattison
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Postby KatyPattison » Tue Apr 08, 2003 10:28 am

I have made small molds (for lamp repairs) out of clay. Roll it flat (I use spacers on the counter to get a uniform thickness), shape it over a shape you like that is covered with saran wrap and cover lightly so it can dry slowly. You can sand it at this point to smooth it out if necessary. Drill your holes and then bisque fire (or take it to a pottery shop and have them bisque fire a bunch for you at one time). They don't last as long as commercially made molds but work just fine.
Katy

Fusionistic
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Postby Fusionistic » Tue Apr 08, 2003 12:32 pm

Katy Pattison wrote:I have made small molds (for lamp repairs) out of clay. Roll it flat (I use spacers on the counter to get a uniform thickness), shape it over a shape you like that is covered with saran wrap and cover lightly so it can dry slowly. You can sand it at this point to smooth it out if necessary. Drill your holes and then bisque fire (or take it to a pottery shop and have them bisque fire a bunch for you at one time). They don't last as long as commercially made molds but work just fine.
Katy


Katy -- any reason you stop at bisque firing the molds? Would they not last longer if you high-fired them?

I have been thinking of creating my own molds. I was planning on using a friends pottery kiln and firing them twice (bisque and high).
Doug Bailey

Jerry

Small Molds

Postby Jerry » Tue Apr 08, 2003 12:57 pm

Bisque firing is a generic term used to designate the process of firing clay to a temperature higher than you ever plan to go again. In pottery we bisque to about 2000 for planned glases that mature at 1875.

For a slumping mold where you probably will never go much over 1500 degrees, bisque firing could be anything over 1600. The higher the better. Higher temps will make a longer lasting mold; I've got some I've been using for at least 10 years. Make sure to use a heavy grog clay like raku clay; it doesn't crack up as much during drying and seems to have an indefinate life span.

Jerry

Valerie
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 7:01 pm
Location: Kentwood Michigan

molds

Postby Valerie » Tue Apr 08, 2003 5:54 pm

alpineglass.com has lots of molds
ceramic & stainless...I buy greenware at my local ceramic shop and fire to bisque. Target , KMart all have stainless stuff you can convert to molds.
:idea:

Fusionistic
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Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2003 12:30 pm

Re: Small Molds

Postby Fusionistic » Tue Apr 08, 2003 6:34 pm

Jerry wrote:Bisque firing is a generic term used to designate the process of firing clay to a temperature higher than you ever plan to go again. In pottery we bisque to about 2000 for planned glases that mature at 1875.

For a slumping mold where you probably will never go much over 1500 degrees, bisque firing could be anything over 1600. The higher the better. Higher temps will make a longer lasting mold; I've got some I've been using for at least 10 years. Make sure to use a heavy grog clay like raku clay; it doesn't crack up as much during drying and seems to have an indefinate life span.

Jerry


OK, I guess I didn't understand that. I had thought that the first firing (prior to applying glaze) was to a lower temperature than the glaze firing.
Doug Bailey

rosanna gusler
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Re: Small Molds

Postby rosanna gusler » Tue Apr 08, 2003 7:30 pm

Fusionistic wrote:
Jerry wrote:Bisque firing is a generic term used to designate the process of firing clay to a temperature higher than you ever plan to go again. In pottery we bisque to about 2000 for planned glases that mature at 1875.

For a slumping mold where you probably will never go much over 1500 degrees, bisque firing could be anything over 1600. The higher the better. Higher temps will make a longer lasting mold; I've got some I've been using for at least 10 years. Make sure to use a heavy grog clay like raku clay; it doesn't crack up as much during drying and seems to have an indefinate life span.

Jerry


OK, I guess I didn't understand that. I had thought that the first firing (prior to applying glaze) was to a lower temperature than the glaze firing.
it can go either way, stoneware and porcelain clays are usually bisqued lower than the glaze/maturing fire. rosanna

Linda Reed
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Postby Linda Reed » Tue Apr 08, 2003 11:27 pm

We have a local ceramics shop that sells bisque ware that I guess people buy and paint or something, but they have TONS of small shapes that can be used as molds (hearts, ruffles, bowls, ovals, christmas ornaments, etc). I bet you can find places on the web. I buy some component stuff from Aftosa - they have a bisqu ware section too. Also haunt thrift shops (or mega stores if you are into that type of thing) for baking type/ decor metal things. Heat, kiln wash and go. Just don't use aluminum. (Am I right? No aluminum? You can tell if a magnet won't stick??)

Linda

PDXBarbara
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Postby PDXBarbara » Wed Apr 09, 2003 12:25 am

Magnets don't stick to stainless either.
BB
(Am I right? No aluminum? You can tell if a magnet won't stick??)

Linda[/quote]
Barbara Bader

Brad Walker
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Postby Brad Walker » Wed Apr 09, 2003 12:42 am

PDXBarbara (Bader) wrote:Magnets don't stick to stainless either.
BB


Some stainless steel is magnetic and some is non-magnetic. The magnetic variants have chromium and sometimes carbon, the non-magnetic have more chromium and add nickel. It's the nickel that turns the material from magnetic to non-magnetic.

Many good stainless steel molds are 18/8, which means they contain 18% chromium and 8% nickel. In addition to making them non-magnetic, this alloy makes them more corrosion resistant and more ductile (easily formable into shapes).

tom suter
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Small Molds

Postby tom suter » Wed Apr 09, 2003 8:16 pm

You might want to try this link they have several small molds and there prices are not toohigh.
http://www.uniqueglasscolors.com/glassaggers.html

Tom


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