Stamping on Glass - WarmGlass.com

Stamping on Glass

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Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Stamping on Glass

Postby Carol B » Fri Mar 19, 2004 7:23 pm

I have been fooling around with stamps ( the paper crafter type ) trying to use glass paints and micas to create a crisp image.

I have not had much luck as the paints are so thin and the glass is pretty slick.

Today I heard about a product called Perfect Medium made by Ranger. It is liquid but very tacky, kind of like very warm wax. I did some test pieces a short while ago using the medium, a commercial stamp and mica's. So far so good, the powders latched on to the medium and I easily brushed away the excess.

I really want to fire these samples but sadly both kilns were fired this morning so I will have to wait until this evening.

Does anyone have any experience with Perfect Medium? (dumb name BTW )
Carol B

Terry Ow-Wing
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Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Fri Mar 19, 2004 10:15 pm

can you post a pic when it is done?

-terry o.
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
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Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Postby Carol B » Fri Mar 19, 2004 10:45 pm

Terry Ow-Wing wrote:can you post a pic when it is done?

-terry o.


Oh yes I will Terry. The samples are in the kiln as I type. If I am sucessful that I intend to move from using manufactured stamps to cutting my own.
Carol B

Paul Tarlow
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Postby Paul Tarlow » Fri Mar 19, 2004 11:02 pm

Try this -- it is one of the techniques I teach in my Frits and Powders class here in Austin:

1) Spray some hairspray onto a piece of paper. Construction paper works well.

2) Use the hair-spray-on-paper like an ink pad to "ink" your rubber stamp.

3) Stamp onto the glass. If you can sand blast the glass surface first it works better.

4) sift your powders onto the "ink" image on the glass

5) give the piece a few minutes to dry

6) turn the piece on its edge an tap lightly to get the non-adhered powder off the glass. I quick puff of air will clean off the dust that is left on non-inked areas.

It takes a while to get a feel for it. The good news is that you'll know right away if the image is good -- and you can wash it off and try again as many times as you'd like.

Enamels work a lot better than powders for this. The amount of powder you get on the glass tends to get lost when fused. The enamels are far more intense and a thin layer holds up very well.

- Paul

Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Postby Carol B » Sat Mar 20, 2004 9:27 am

Paul Tarlow wrote:Try this -- it is one of the techniques I teach in my Frits and Powders class here in Austin:

Enamels work a lot better than powders for this. The amount of powder you get on the glass tends to get lost when fused. The enamels are far more intense and a thin layer holds up very well.

- Paul


Thanks for the suggestion Paul. Hairspray is much cheaper than the medium I am trying out.

The samples turned out quite well. The quality of my stamping is a bit rough, as you noted if you do not like the image it can be washed and stamped again. But I am pleased with the detail.

You can see the samples at
http://homepage.mac.com/carolbauer1/PhotoAlbum21.html
Carol B

Terry Ow-Wing
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Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Sat Mar 20, 2004 1:46 pm

looks good for a first try. Another idea is to use a subject that can be more design compatible with "fuzzy" edges. Something like an unerwater scene, something abstract - add some lampwork. In some of my design discussion with the glass I try to let it talk to me rather than "command" it performance...like kids sometime the glass tell you everthing and sometimes well.....

-good luck!
Last edited by Terry Ow-Wing on Fri Apr 02, 2004 4:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
Image

Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Postby Carol B » Sun Mar 21, 2004 9:41 pm

Terry Ow-Wing wrote:looks good for a first try. Another ida is to use a subject that can be more design compatible with "fuzzy" edges. Something like an unerwater scene, something abstract - add some lampwork. In some of my design discussion with the glass I try to let it talk to me rather than "command" it performance...like kids sometime the glass tell you everthing and sometimes well.....

-good luck!


Thank you for the suggestions about "fuzzyness". My original goal was to try to create a crisp edge without the use of equipment I do not own. I was not entirely sucessful in creating a crisp edge but am pleased with the initial results and will explore the possiblities as my day job allows.

I have to admit I do not listen to what the glass may be trying to tell me. I have a background in mathmatics and science and am approaching the art of fused glass by first learning to work with it's physical properties. As I learn what I can do with it I am hoping that creativity will surface.

Even if great artistry does not come I am having a heck of a great time learning to manipulate glass.

Geek chick signing off.
\:D/
Carol B

froggee501
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Location: Portamazoo, MI

Postby froggee501 » Thu Apr 01, 2004 11:13 pm

question: when using the mica on the surface, can it then be scratched off again? or other wise removed? Or will it bond sufficently?

Emma

Alecia Helton
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Postby Alecia Helton » Sat Apr 03, 2004 10:58 am

CarolB,

When I took Karen Reed's class on Surface Design of fused glass, she said most paint wouldn't adhere to glass unless you sandblasted or etched the surface first. This would remove the slick surface and you might have better luck.

Alecia
Alecia Helton
Wear Original Wonders!
Carrollton TX

Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Postby Carol B » Sat Apr 03, 2004 11:19 am

froggee501 wrote:question: when using the mica on the surface, can it then be scratched off again? or other wise removed? Or will it bond sufficently?

Emma


Emma,

I made several samples, capped and uncapped. I then took a knife to the surface of the uncapped samples and none of the mica came off.
Carol B

Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Postby Carol B » Sat Apr 03, 2004 11:21 am

Alecia Helton wrote:CarolB,

When I took Karen Reed's class on Surface Design of fused glass, she said most paint wouldn't adhere to glass unless you sandblasted or etched the surface first. This would remove the slick surface and you might have better luck.

Alecia


Thanks for the suggestion, Alecia. I do not have a sand blaster but I will try the etching.
Carol B

Paul Tarlow
Posts: 344
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:06 pm
Location: Helios Kiln Glass Studio - Austin
Contact:

Postby Paul Tarlow » Sat Apr 03, 2004 11:31 am

CarolB wrote:
Alecia Helton wrote:CarolB,

When I took Karen Reed's class on Surface Design of fused glass, she said most paint wouldn't adhere to glass unless you sandblasted or etched the surface first. This would remove the slick surface and you might have better luck.

Alecia


Thanks for the suggestion, Alecia. I do not have a sand blaster but I will try the etching.


Sandblasting is not necissary before firing glass with mica.

- Paul

Avery Anderson
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Postby Avery Anderson » Sat Apr 03, 2004 11:36 am

Paul Tarlow wrote:
CarolB wrote:
Alecia Helton wrote:CarolB,

When I took Karen Reed's class on Surface Design of fused glass, she said most paint wouldn't adhere to glass unless you sandblasted or etched the surface first. This would remove the slick surface and you might have better luck.

Alecia


Thanks for the suggestion, Alecia. I do not have a sand blaster but I will try the etching.


Sandblasting is not necissary before firing glass with mica.

- Paul


Agree Paul, nor is it necessary when using enamels.

Avery

Carol B
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 2:15 pm
Location: Olympia Washington

Postby Carol B » Sat Apr 03, 2004 11:44 am

Paul Tarlow wrote:
CarolB wrote:
Alecia Helton wrote:CarolB,

When I took Karen Reed's class on Surface Design of fused glass, she said most paint wouldn't adhere to glass unless you sandblasted or etched the surface first. This would remove the slick surface and you might have better luck.

Alecia


Thanks for the suggestion, Alecia. I do not have a sand blaster but I will try the etching.


Sandblasting is not necissary before firing glass with mica.

- Paul


That is good to know. My experiments came out fine without roughing up the surface. I am having some trouble with the stamp slipping on the glass when I am applying the sticky medium. I am going to try etching the surface and see if that improves the crispness of the stamping.
Carol B

rodney
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Location: new mexico
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Postby rodney » Sat Apr 03, 2004 12:00 pm

THANKS FOR THIS INFO,,,,

paul could you talk about the difference between powder and enamel,,,,i know i can make my own powder, but how do you make enamel,,,
thanks
rodney

Alecia Helton
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 12:35 am
Location: outside of Dallas TX

Postby Alecia Helton » Sat Apr 03, 2004 12:43 pm

Paul,

I don't know anything about micas, that's why I signed up for your class yesterday.

See you next month in Austin.

Alecia
Alecia Helton

Wear Original Wonders!

Carrollton TX

Paul Tarlow
Posts: 344
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:06 pm
Location: Helios Kiln Glass Studio - Austin
Contact:

Postby Paul Tarlow » Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:16 pm

rodney wrote:THANKS FOR THIS INFO,,,,

paul could you talk about the difference between powder and enamel,,,,i know i can make my own powder, but how do you make enamel,,,
thanks
rodney


Powdered glass is just that -- sheet glass that has been ground to powder.

The colors in enamels are much more intenses and intended to only go on as a very thin layer. They aren't as compatible as the powder -- but because they go on thinly it usually doesn't matter.

For example -- if you were to sift a very thin layer of powder onto sheet of glass and fire it you will very often "lose" the powder into the sheet glass. Not so with enamels.

I don't know how to make enamels. I buy mine from Thompson. Their sample packs are reasonably priced and go a long way.

- Paul


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