Duraboard repair - WarmGlass.com

Duraboard repair

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Marilyn Kaminski
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Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 10:27 am
Location: Boulder, CO

Duraboard repair

Postby Marilyn Kaminski » Mon Mar 29, 2004 11:37 am

I was really lovin' life with my new Duraboard (2", HD) until I tried a hi-fire on it ... long story short, I've now got massive gouges in it. Per a suggestion in the old archive, I made a paste out of kiln wash and rigidizer and applied it with a putty knife. A week later I tried sanding it smooth but the "spackle" didn't really stick to the board. Most of it flaked off with the sanding.

Any thoughts? Should I have sanded off the kiln wash before applying the paste? (had I thought of that one earlier, I probably would have tried it initially) Fired the board before sanding off the paste? What the heck do I do now?

At least I didn't cut up my old mullite boards in the meantime!

All help appreciated -- Marilyn

Brock
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 1:32 pm
Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Re: Duraboard repair

Postby Brock » Mon Mar 29, 2004 11:56 am

Marilyn Kaminski wrote:I was really lovin' life with my new Duraboard (2", HD) until I tried a hi-fire on it ... long story short, I've now got massive gouges in it. Per a suggestion in the old archive, I made a paste out of kiln wash and rigidizer and applied it with a putty knife. A week later I tried sanding it smooth but the "spackle" didn't really stick to the board. Most of it flaked off with the sanding.

Any thoughts? Should I have sanded off the kiln wash before applying the paste? (had I thought of that one earlier, I probably would have tried it initially) Fired the board before sanding off the paste? What the heck do I do now?

At least I didn't cut up my old mullite boards in the meantime!

All help appreciated -- Marilyn


A lot of materials won't take feathering, which means a gradual tapered amount of material coming back UP to the substrate. For wxample, asphalt. If you want to repair asphalt, you have to dig a vertical sided hole and fill it, you can't just spread the asphalt out thin on a depression. So . . . can you flip the board and start over? Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Marilyn Kaminski
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 10:27 am
Location: Boulder, CO

Postby Marilyn Kaminski » Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:17 pm

Ah, hell, I was hoping for a Plan B before I get to this point!

I could flip it over, but the backside has a funky unpleasant texture that I don't like. I do have a second board still in the box, so Plan Z will be to start over with that one. Pretty expensive muck-up, though! Maybe I'll just keep fooling around with this one and see if I can discover a solution.

- M

charlie
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:08 pm

Postby charlie » Mon Mar 29, 2004 6:39 pm

since it's so thick, can you somehow shave it down somehow? it'd be a bit thinner, but so what?

a surface planer or wide belt sander would work well i would think, because it's so soft and they also use a good dust collection system. they make 36" wide ones. try a woodworking place or furniture quality lumber yard for one. if they don't have one, they'll know if there are any locally.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Mar 29, 2004 7:07 pm

Flip it over. First rigidize with colloidal alumina or silica. Fire the shelf. Then grind it flat. I believe that John Groth ground his flat by using a very flat mullite kiln shelf like a sanding block. Continually check with a straight edge.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
http://www.customartglass.com
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Stuart Clayman
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Postby Stuart Clayman » Thu Apr 01, 2004 11:44 am

I saw a product last night that was made to repair boards. It comes in a tube for a caulking gun. It was purchased from a supplier of items for boiler rooms and it said on it to repair the boards. I can get more info next week if needed.

Stuart
Kiln Repair by a Clayman kilnrepair@yahoo.com
Glassworks by a Clayman
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Marilyn Kaminski
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 10:27 am
Location: Boulder, CO

Postby Marilyn Kaminski » Thu Apr 01, 2004 9:58 pm

I'd be interested in seeing what you find out. I'm experimenting on mine -- I figure I have nothing to lose at this point!

- Marilyn

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:56 am

Marilyn Kaminski wrote:I'd be interested in seeing what you find out. I'm experimenting on mine -- I figure I have nothing to lose at this point!

- Marilyn


Unifrax LDS moldable
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

Stuart Clayman
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2003 12:35 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Postby Stuart Clayman » Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:00 pm

Thanks Bert,
that is it.
Kiln Repair by a Clayman kilnrepair@yahoo.com

Glassworks by a Clayman

http://www.GlassArtists.org/GlassworksByAClayman


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