wanting to learn glass weaving - WarmGlass.com

wanting to learn glass weaving

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

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Gabriel
Posts: 28
Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2003 4:36 pm
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

wanting to learn glass weaving

Postby Gabriel » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:00 am

I searched through the archives for "glass weaving" looking to match all term and was only able to find 3 threads. I quickly browsed through all of them, but did not find any links or relative information on how to acomplish this. Does anyone offer a glass, book, or web link that can give more insight into how this is done?

Thanks

Brock
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Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:15 am


slats
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 9:19 pm

glass weaving

Postby slats » Tue Mar 30, 2004 4:18 pm

beautiful site brock but it doesnt explain how it is done.

Katia T.
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Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2003 4:35 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro / Brazil

Re: glass weaving

Postby Katia T. » Tue Mar 30, 2004 4:23 pm

doctac wrote:beautiful site brock but it doesnt explain how it is done.

This site has a picture of how it´s donne. I think it is amazing...
http://www.brottworks.com/woven.html?95,26
Katia

Brock
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Re: glass weaving

Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 4:23 pm

doctac wrote:beautiful site brock but it doesnt explain how it is done.


Contact Bill, and ask him!

Don't be surprised if you have to figure it out by yourself.

If I had spent a lot of time perfecting a technique, I may not just give it away!

Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

travisraybold
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Postby travisraybold » Tue Mar 30, 2004 5:34 pm

i've never tried it, but i thought about making a wavy mold and slumping thin strips on it, then offsetting every other piece by half of the wavelength, and feeding straight strips through crosswise, then tack fusing the whole thing.

it might work :)

--travis

sadiesjewels
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Postby sadiesjewels » Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:43 pm

Hello ...

My understanding is this is how it is done - basics only as I've never done it myself ...

Cut some fiber paper/board strips ... say 1/8" thick fiber paper/board and lay them on a kiln shelf a suitable distance apart .. say 1" or so - all horizontal to each other ... then cut 3/4" strips of glass and slump them over the fiber paper/board so that the glass is effectively wavy in appearance. Now weave more 3/4" strips of glass through the wavy pieces (you have to offset them one space I think) ... now tack fuse them together ... so that you have a lattice.

Finally ... and this is the tricky part I think ... make some kind of mold to slump the lattice over - and the examples you see defy my non existent mold making skills ... perhaps he manipulates them hot? I think they are wonderful! Then slump or do whatever to make them into contorted wonderful lattice shapes ...

Or, just slump them into a ceramic bowl - smile ...

sadie


- I believe there was a thread on it sometime in the distant past ...

sadiesjewels
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Postby sadiesjewels » Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:45 pm

ahh ... so it really does help to read the whole thread and follow the links ... lol!

sadie

Jack Bowman
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Postby Jack Bowman » Wed Mar 31, 2004 2:02 am

sadiesjewels wrote:Hello ...

My understanding is this is how it is done - basics only as I've never done it myself ...

Cut some fiber paper/board strips ... say 1/8" thick fiber paper/board and lay them on a kiln shelf a suitable distance apart .. say 1" or so - all horizontal to each other .


I won't say 1/8" thick fiber won't work but it didn't work for me. I cut kiln shelves 3/8 to 1/2" thick and it worked. You have to take into account the thickness of the glass x2 plus the thickness of the glass you are going to insert. Anyway, that's what worked for me.

Jack

Andrew
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Jack's right

Postby Andrew » Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:34 am

Jack's right. I've made a weaving exactly that way. If you want to visualize it, draw an edge-on view. You have to account for the thickness of the glass when calculating how high to make the hills and valleys. I cut 1/2" fiberboard, and layed multiple pieces together on their sides then glued them at the right intervals to fiberpaper so they wouldn't move when I transferred them to the kiln. You have to make sure you put the glass on perpendicular to the cross pieces too.

You also need to fire it fairly hot because you are not just slumping but conforming some fairly lightweight pieces to your mold.

I haven't tried it, but glass noodles should work well and give a tighter weave.

Andy

Gabriel
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Location: Fort Wayne, IN

artists contacted

Postby Gabriel » Wed Mar 31, 2004 2:26 pm

Just to update if anyone else is interested:
I contacted Andrew Brott and William Zweifel and neither are open to classes or one on one instruction at this moment. Andrew may be open to teaching classes at the earliest two quarters from now. I am going to speak to Roy at Delphi to see if that is a possibility.

Tony Serviente
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Postby Tony Serviente » Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:35 pm

Travis put it the most succinctly. I have been weaving for a while now, but have gotten more intense about it in the past two years. Like alot of techniques there is more than one way to do it, and the basics are not very difficult. Fiber board, brick, or pipes will serve as good form material for your first experiments. The challenge for me lies in getting good control of the process. It is not very hard to weave, but it is considerably harder to get good regularity and evenness. Lots of fun for weft brained individuals.

Brock
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Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Postby Brock » Wed Mar 31, 2004 6:02 pm

Tony Serviente wrote:Travis put it the most succinctly. I have been weaving for a while now, but have gotten more intense about it in the past two years. Like alot of techniques there is more than one way to do it, and the basics are not very difficult. Fiber board, brick, or pipes will serve as good form material for your first experiments. The challenge for me lies in getting good control of the process. It is not very hard to weave, but it is considerably harder to get good regularity and evenness. Lots of fun for weft brained individuals.


I just hope they're not warped. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

gone

Postby gone » Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:50 pm

Brock wrote:
Tony Serviente wrote:Travis put it the most succinctly. I have been weaving for a while now, but have gotten more intense about it in the past two years. Like alot of techniques there is more than one way to do it, and the basics are not very difficult. Fiber board, brick, or pipes will serve as good form material for your first experiments. The challenge for me lies in getting good control of the process. It is not very hard to weave, but it is considerably harder to get good regularity and evenness. Lots of fun for weft brained individuals.


I just hope they're not warped. Brock


Ooooh, good one Brock!

Tony Serviente
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Postby Tony Serviente » Wed Mar 31, 2004 11:02 pm

Brock-Had to knit my brows for a good response, but at this point am suffering from shear tiredness and am just spinning my wheels. Maybe tomorrow there will be loom for improvement.

Brock
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Postby Brock » Wed Mar 31, 2004 11:27 pm

Tony Serviente wrote:Brock-Had to knit my brows for a good response, but at this point am suffering from shear tiredness and am just spinning my wheels. Maybe tomorrow there will be loom for improvement.


I feel enmeshed in an imbroglio here. I'm dyeing to get to the resolution of this, I can feel it in every fiber of my being, but I don't want to get fleeced. My car is a beater, and getting rid of it will be a big weight off my shoulders

I'm so happy, I'm beaming, because I got carded.

Rapunzel
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

froggee501
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Location: Portamazoo, MI

Postby froggee501 » Thu Apr 01, 2004 12:28 am

*groaning*

*loudly*

y'all are evil... :p

Tony Serviente
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Postby Tony Serviente » Thu Apr 01, 2004 10:20 am

That sounds like a tale made of whole cloth. Wool do everyone a favor if we cut this out Brock. Ewe are as bad as I. Weave mutilated and spindled , and it is time to hold this topic at yarns length.

Brock
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 1:32 pm
Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Postby Brock » Thu Apr 01, 2004 10:22 am

Tony Serviente wrote:That sounds like a tale made of whole cloth. Wool do everyone a favor if we cut this out Brock. Ewe are as bad as I. Weave mutilated and spindled , and it is time to hold this topic at yarns length.


Okay, Tony. I ran out of material anyway.

Skein of you to offer to end this.

Seams reasonable to me.

Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Bev Brandt
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Location: St. Louis, MO
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Postby Bev Brandt » Thu Apr 01, 2004 10:59 am

Brock wrote:
Okay, Tony. I ran out of material anyway.

Skein of you to offer to end this.

Seams reasonable to me.

Brock


I guess it's too late to selvedge this thread. Maybe I'm biased, but it really ripped me up!

- Bev
Bev Brandt


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