Fusing projects suitable for elementary age students - WarmGlass.com

Fusing projects suitable for elementary age students

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DebbieB
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Fusing projects suitable for elementary age students

Postby DebbieB » Tue Mar 30, 2004 5:26 pm

I'm currently a volunteer art docent for my daughter's third grade class & am considering having them make a fused glass tile or magnet for one of their art projects. Is this age appropriate or should they be older? They will not have anything to do with the kiln. Also, would appreciate any other suggestions on other possible warm glass projects for this age group.

Thanks!

Brock
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Re: Fusing projects suitable for elementary age students

Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 5:35 pm

mom95314 wrote:I'm currently a volunteer art docent for my daughter's third grade class & am considering having them make a fused glass tile or magnet for one of their art projects. Is this age appropriate or should they be older? They will not have anything to do with the kiln. Also, would appreciate any other suggestions on other possible warm glass projects for this age group.

Thanks!


I've taught kids younger, go for it.

It's basically an exercise in composition, you supply elements that they stick onto a blank for firing.

Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Cynthia

Postby Cynthia » Tue Mar 30, 2004 6:15 pm

I knew a woman who taught kids on occasion. She always pre-fired small cut pieces...geometric shapes, circles and such just hot enough to soften the sharp edges. The kids didn't cut or break glass...just collaged the pieces up (like Colorforms) with the user friendly pieces she offered (frit, stringers, noodles and confetti too). They typically made tiles or window hangings. She called them suncathchers.

I have always worked with kids that were no younger than 10...and with a parents consent/release form filled out. I gave the kids access to all materials and equipment and they have always done well (with a safety discussion and rules to be adhered to). Kids are without inhibition and make the best stuff.

Terry Ow-Wing
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Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Tue Mar 30, 2004 7:45 pm

this example will not answer your question but it might give other ideas. For my daughter preschool (age 3 - 4) I brought some of my portraits for them to see. I chickened out of working with glass at this age. But instead of working with glass I made pipe cleaner shapes and let them pick out the shapes. I made sure they had a variety and at least one straight piece that they could form into any shape they wanted. The composed them and taped them to a paper. They had fun. There were a few candidates that would compete with my work and of course my daughter's piece looked nothing like my work! :roll: Fun nevertheless.

Think Fun!
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
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Phil Hoppes
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Postby Phil Hoppes » Tue Mar 30, 2004 8:03 pm

( I gotta be nuts...) I'm teaching a group of 105 to 110 fifth graders on glass fusing. I'm going to precut all of the elements. (like the tip on heating them to knock of the edges) and then we will use corse frit and stringers in addition to the design elemets to make the tiles. I'll have them glue down the designs and then fuse and slump them for them. I'm doing an overview to the entire group and then the actual construction will talk place in 3 separate classes of smaller size and then we will present all of the finished tiles at once.

Phil

Brock
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Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 8:18 pm

Phil Hoppes wrote:( I gotta be nuts...) I'm teaching a group of 105 to 110 fifth graders on glass fusing. I'm going to precut all of the elements. (like the tip on heating them to knock of the edges) and then we will use corse frit and stringers in addition to the design elemets to make the tiles. I'll have them glue down the designs and then fuse and slump them for them. I'm doing an overview to the entire group and then the actual construction will talk place in 3 separate classes of smaller size and then we will present all of the finished tiles at once.

Phil


Yes, you must be!

Phil, what do you mean you'll fuse and slump them?

Are you making tiles to go around a column?

Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Phil Hoppes
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Postby Phil Hoppes » Tue Mar 30, 2004 8:26 pm

When I say tiles, the project is a small 4.5" square tile. I have a bunch of small molds I got very cheap from a local pottery store. They are kind of like coffee cup saucers or (gag...cough.....cough) ash trays. I wanted them to have something shaped instead of just flat. If this works I'm going to see if we can't work with a somewhat smaller group next year and do real tiles for a mural to be put on a wall in the school. I think that would be really cool.

Soon-to-be-Crazy-Boy

Tim Swann
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Postby Tim Swann » Wed Mar 31, 2004 1:02 am

When I have taught young children to fuse I start out small with a magnet. Short attention spans and the need for instant gratification. If they want to learn more I have them do a picture frame with random scrap pieces. Some of the kids have progressed to bowls and fused panels for stain glass lamps.

Tim

kelly alge
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Postby kelly alge » Wed Mar 31, 2004 11:20 am

I teach fusing to kids all the time- one thing to remember is that the tools are made too big for most kids hands younger than about 3rd grade- (I wish they'd make glass tools for kids, but I suppose that's an oxymoron of sorts) For older kids it's helpful to have lots of gallon size ziplock bags that they can use to catch pieces they cut with rod loppers. They can fit both hands and the tool in the bag when they cut. Glass cutters and running pliers are hard for kids to handle until about 4th or 5th grade. I do classes with 4-7 year olds with a parent's help and that works out great. I also use large spoons for digging through the scrap bin so they aren't tempted to dig with their hands.
kelly alge

"An ordinary life is a crime" -eric schmider

Phil Hoppes
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Postby Phil Hoppes » Wed Mar 31, 2004 1:25 pm

I'm pre-cutting so they do not have to use any tools other than watered down elmers glue and maybe a candle to bend stringers, spoons for frit. I'm going to take the above hint and do a quick fire on the cut glass to smooth the edges. We are going to have worksheet handouts on the first session to kind of let them know what the designs are going to look like. I'm guessing some will pay attention, that gray middle group will maybe get a clue and there will be some mix that will be bored, confused, and non interested. If I can spark just a little interest in a few in the arts, well dare I say, mission accomplished. With a little more effort and work with the art teachers I think there are some cool things we can do to help foster even a little more interest. I know I'm speaking to the choir here but it torques my chain when every time budgets get cut music and the arts suffer first and naturally (at the jr and high level) sports never get cut. My part is a small effort but I think its important to give a little back and I can't think of a better way to do it than using my current endevors as a vehicle.

Phil

bkfoltz
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Postby bkfoltz » Wed Mar 31, 2004 3:32 pm

[img]http://www.warner-criv.com/picturealbums/public_photos.aspx?aid=103

Here is what I did with the kids at the school where I work. I fired on shelf paper because I did not want to mess up the art teachers shelves. Kids worked with squares that I cut and frit that I made. Used glue made for fusing, oversprayed. Only had 1 cut finger.

[/img]http://www.warner-criv.com/picturealbums/public_photos.aspx?aid=103

DebbieB
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Postby DebbieB » Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:03 pm

Wow - lots of great tips & suggestions! Thanks! You've all inspired me to give it a try. Phil, I salute you - I'm only going to be doing this with 25 kids.

Deb

charlie
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Postby charlie » Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:07 pm

one of this year's magless exchange participants (Christie McLean) is a teacher. her students produced all the mags that she sent. you might contact her for what she does.

DebbieB
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Postby DebbieB » Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:12 pm

Thanks Charlie, I will!

Deb

Steve Immerman
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Postby Steve Immerman » Wed Mar 31, 2004 7:03 pm

Phil Hoppes wrote:If this works I'm going to see if we can't work with a somewhat smaller group next year and do real tiles for a mural to be put on a wall in the school. I think that would be really cool.

Soon-to-be-Crazy-Boy

Phil,

There is a fabulous mural of tiles done by elementary school children in the Seattle Aquarium. I did a web search and didn't come up with any photos, but this description:

Bailey Gatzert Elementary and T.T. Minor Elementary Schools, at The Seattle Aquarium, Seattle, WA Installation and dedication - 1994. Done by Mark Eckstrand http://www.markeckstrand.com/index.html

He might be able to give you some tips on this.

Steve

charlie
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Postby charlie » Wed Mar 31, 2004 7:11 pm

Steve Immerman wrote:
Phil Hoppes wrote:If this works I'm going to see if we can't work with a somewhat smaller group next year and do real tiles for a mural to be put on a wall in the school. I think that would be really cool.

Soon-to-be-Crazy-Boy

Phil,

There is a fabulous mural of tiles done by elementary school children in the Seattle Aquarium. I did a web search and didn't come up with any photos, but this description:

Bailey Gatzert Elementary and T.T. Minor Elementary Schools, at The Seattle Aquarium, Seattle, WA Installation and dedication - 1994. Done by Mark Eckstrand http://www.markeckstrand.com/index.html

He might be able to give you some tips on this.

Steve


this particular one: http://www.markeckstrand.com/seascape4.htm

the rest of his children projects: http://www.markeckstrand.com/projects.htm

Kelly Burke Makuch
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Postby Kelly Burke Makuch » Wed Mar 31, 2004 7:22 pm

I would first give the teachers and the principal a proposal on what you wish to do . The will give you a laundry list of their own concerns--(as well they should) This may give you a better idea of what the schools comfort level is.

I have found the more successes you have in the school volunteer mode, the less restrictive a school would be. It might be a good idea to address in your proposal that you are also concerned with safety and that you would encourage a letter of permission to be sent home(of course while reinforcing that the children can handle it.)

Last year I tought(along with wonderful volunteers) 100 third graders how to quilt. We both machine and hand sewed. It was a great success! Not 1 bandage used! My motto at our school has always been "small hands can do great things".Children can handle many things if given clear direction and the reassurance that they CAN do it! It's the big people that have the fears.

Don't be afraid to think big! Think about linking the project together with something in the curriculum. You can link the project to a book that is read or to community service. each child can do a small tile that is a part of a larger art piece.

One year I worked with 2nd graders on a project --- again, not glass,--we did a group painting. The children were given choice on what we should do with the painting and they voted to donate it to the pediatric wing of a hospital.. I bussed the children to the hospital to donate the painting to the Head of Pediatrics. The hospital was thrilled.. The children got a field trip that included not only a tour, but they got to see how "small hands can do great things" The children were empowered by their actions in the community. A great experience. A little different than bringing in a canned good for the needy. They saw how even "little" things can positively impact others lives.

Maybe a Mother's/Fathers Day gift?

Sorry, I get carried away with this volunteer stuff....Whatever you decide to do--- HAVE FUN!

Activist at heart....
Kelly

Steve Immerman
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Postby Steve Immerman » Wed Mar 31, 2004 7:49 pm

Thanks Charlie. I didn't dig deep enough into the web site to find the photos. They are much better looking than the photos demonstrate.

Steve

Phil Hoppes
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Postby Phil Hoppes » Wed Mar 31, 2004 9:24 pm

Steve & Charlie,

Thanks, Barbara B. pointed this out to me a few posts back. Looks like he is a glass blower and makes a bunch of standard type design elements for the kids to use. Very cool. Like I said, I'm going to see how this one works and then go from there.

Phil

PDXBarbara
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Postby PDXBarbara » Thu Apr 01, 2004 3:15 pm

Phil Hoppes wrote: (like the tip on heating them to knock of the edges)

Phil

Hi Phil... In my experience with kids during the past year, they've required fewer bandaids than yours truly. I didn't pre-fire elements, unless they required it (ie, pre-fused bits like murini or whatever). I was surprised how careful they were. They also used candles to bend stringer. They loved it and only 1 kid touched the glass while hot & got a teeny ouchie. no biggee.
Pre-rounding edges takes a lot of extra time.
Just my .02....
Barbara
Barbara Bader


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