Question On Firing Reusche Enamels & Stains - Page 2 - WarmGlass.com

Question On Firing Reusche Enamels & Stains

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Kristina
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Postby Kristina » Mon Apr 05, 2004 12:09 pm

What flesh tone glass do you prefer (Maker & color?) I would be interested in playing with it/them.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Apr 05, 2004 12:16 pm

Kristina wrote:What flesh tone glass do you prefer (Maker & color?) I would be interested in playing with it/them.


Which race? Red for flesh from Reushce is pretty much a standard for those rosy white folks.
Bert

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Kristina
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Postby Kristina » Mon Apr 05, 2004 1:31 pm

You silly - the subject is flesh toned GLASS.

I was asking her what brand of flesh colored glass she uses as her base material.

You make a great point though. Most of the religious windows depict fair skinned whites, versus olive skinned jews...

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Apr 05, 2004 2:31 pm

Kristina wrote:You silly - the subject is flesh toned GLASS.

I was asking her what brand of flesh colored glass she uses as her base material.

You make a great point though. Most of the religious windows depict fair skinned whites, versus olive skinned jews...


You can use the red for flesh enamel on white or clear. Getting a good matte with this enamel is a difficult skill. Play around with different media like lavendar oil or alcohol.

Just remember if English was good enough for Jesus, it should have been good enough for Mel.
Bert



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Kristina
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Postby Kristina » Mon Apr 05, 2004 2:45 pm

Reminds me of a Pastor friend who was commending the New American Standard version to his huffy great aunt, who told him if the King James version was good enough for the apostle Paul it was good enough for her!

What more could he say...

Vic
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Postby Vic » Mon Apr 05, 2004 5:16 pm

When paintingon DS float glass, you need to know which is the "floated" side. Expensive red paint turns bronw when fired in the floated side.

Dani
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Postby Dani » Mon Apr 05, 2004 6:17 pm

Kristina wrote:Reminds me of a Pastor friend who was commending the New American Standard version to his huffy great aunt, who told him if the King James version was good enough for the apostle Paul it was good enough for her!

What more could he say...


Which goes to show you how folks skew the facts... the King James bible was translated from the Catholic Vulgate version... doubt if Paul had anything to do with it!

As to the glass, a peach GNA or the best... Glashutte Lamberts has a translucent opal flash that's yummy. And Fremont has a peachy glass. Wissmach used to have a nice glass they called sand, but I don't think they make that anymore.....

.... or paint with red for flesh (more opaque) or rouge (which is more transluscent and also lower fire)... the rouge is nice with bistre or umber for the shadowing.

Kristina
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Postby Kristina » Mon Apr 05, 2004 6:52 pm

In the Old Archives there are notes about not using Windex, and that it causes devit (?).

What is devit, and why shouldn't one use windex?

Or does it not apply to your run of the mill, copper foiled or leaded stained glass work like I am doing?

Dani
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Postby Dani » Mon Apr 05, 2004 9:56 pm

Devitrification is white hazing on the glass that can occur in certain fusing temperature ranges and more so with some glasses. You don't have to worry about it with the glass painting, at least not with the Reusches which don't fire as hot as some other glass paints. I'm trying to think if we've ever had problems with window cleaner... I usually wash the glass with water and then use some rubbing alcohol if there are any oil spots that are resisting the paint application. It's a good habit not to use Windex or anything with ammonia in it.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:34 pm

As I understand it Windex actually has an additive in it that attracts dirt so you have to use it again sooner. At any rate, glass cleaned with Windex comes out of the kiln with scum on it.

One of the best glass cleaners is enamel. wipe some on and off and the glass is clean. I use a glass cleaner with a no ammonia formula, like Glass Plus.
Bert



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Dani
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Postby Dani » Tue Apr 06, 2004 12:57 am

So here's a question for ya.... the correct pronunciation of Reusche should be Roy-shuh.... so, why do we all say Roo-SHAY? Eh? :?: :roll:

Kristina
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Postby Kristina » Tue Apr 06, 2004 8:13 am

I will head for the store & get the Glass Plus today! I also read 1 part Vinegar to 5 parts water I think in the archives? Is that effective?

And while on the subject of Archives, putty was covered widely...

Bert you use a homemade mix of whiting & linseed oil, & if need be thinned with turpentine? What proportions?

You wrote that you thumb it in; & then do you use whiting & a pointed stick to remove excess?

How long do you leave it set before doing the final cleaning & patina or coloring of the putty?

How do you color it to match the black patina??

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Apr 06, 2004 8:58 am

Kristina wrote:I will head for the store & get the Glass Plus today! I also read 1 part Vinegar to 5 parts water I think in the archives? Is that effective?

And while on the subject of Archives, putty was covered widely...

Bert you use a homemade mix of whiting & linseed oil, & if need be thinned with turpentine? What proportions?

You wrote that you thumb it in; & then do you use whiting & a pointed stick to remove excess?

How long do you leave it set before doing the final cleaning & patina or coloring of the putty?

How do you color it to match the black patina??


Vinegar will likely dissolve enamel.

I recommend buying linseed oil putty. It used to be used by painters as a spackle for woodwork. Once you understand the material, you can make it yourself. I have no idea of the recipe, you just start kneading whiting in to some linseed oil. It takes a lot of whiting. Old timers used red lead to make it dry faster. You can stick it once it is all in there. You vigorously rub the leads with whiting and a bristle scrub brush. The leads turn the whiting gray.

I believe that you must be taught by a master to properly learn how to tuck flat leads. From the very first steps of patterning and cutting there are nuances that will yield fast and strong construction. You will not figure these out by common sense. No other style of lead came, leaded glass is as strong or long lasting. I don't wish to argue about copper foil.
Bert



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Vic
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Postby Vic » Tue Apr 06, 2004 9:12 am

To make putty. Whiting, 50% raw linseed oil, 50% boiled linseed oil, cement color pigment (black). Boiled oil dries faster then raw. If you add more boiled oil the putty will set up faster, and dry out in the can faster. Add oil to the whiting till the putty is like taffy and thumb it under the lead. Clean with a little whiting and an old soft shoe brush. The faster you clean the darker the lead gets. There is no need to patina lead.

Ammonia is fine for cleaning new windows. BUT, it will dissolve the putty. Spray it on a rag and clean. Don't spray directly on the window.

Dani
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Postby Dani » Tue Apr 06, 2004 12:06 pm

Ammonia is murder on lead, too.... best to just stay away from the Windex and be sure the customer knows it, too. Benign neglect is the best thing for them to learn. As to putty, don't use any hardening agents like portland cement in your mix, or Plaster of Paris which will create lime bloom over time. In fact, with the direction you're headed, it wouldn't be a bad idea for you to read Julie Sloan's book, Conservation of Stained Glass in America.... for up-front conservation.

Kristina
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Postby Kristina » Tue Apr 06, 2004 12:11 pm

Thanks all...

and what is the debate & reality on Copper Foil versus lead?

I have been told it is stronger than leaded windows, & then been told the opposite.

Can you edjukate me a bit on it?

charlie
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Postby charlie » Tue Apr 06, 2004 12:15 pm

you make a choice depending upon the look, not the strength. they can be both made pretty equally as fast, as easy, and as strong. you need to plan for reinforcements on panels over about 14 linear feet, exterior dimensions added up, or if it's installed in movable panels/doors/windows, and depending upon what it's framed in.

there's a stained glass email group at http://www.bungi.com/

Barbara Muth
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Postby Barbara Muth » Tue Apr 06, 2004 1:40 pm

Dani wrote:So here's a question for ya.... the correct pronunciation of Reusche should be Roy-shuh.... so, why do we all say Roo-SHAY? Eh? :?: :roll:


Dani it never ever occurred to me to pronounce it as Roo-SHAY. And I have never heard it pronounced that way. I have always pronounced it as Roysh.
Barbara
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Dani
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Postby Dani » Tue Apr 06, 2004 1:53 pm

LOL. See what I mean.... they answer their phones RooSHAY. I guess even if they're wrong, they have a right to pronounce their own name any way they want. Still, I find it odd that they've taken on a French tone. Probably another one of those things that goes back to Ellis Island, what do you think?

charlie
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Postby charlie » Tue Apr 06, 2004 1:55 pm

sorta like if you see a porsche (porsh) on the highway, it's a porsche (por-sha) if you speak to the driver?


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