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Paint experiences

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

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Allan Gott
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Paint experiences

Postby Allan Gott » Sat Apr 10, 2004 1:27 pm

A current one-off project involves painting on a piece of float which is going to be glazed into a triple pane sealed unit.

I'd prefer to go with a low fire enamel to avoid any deviation from perfectly flat in the piece,but the archives, and Brad in particular, are not very positive about the longevity of the Pebeo product.

Pebeo, Fusemaster, Reusche? Any feedback regarding the use of these enamels is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Allan

Avery Anderson
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Postby Avery Anderson » Sat Apr 10, 2004 10:20 pm

Allan:

Although I don't work in low fire enamels, Reusche has many enamel products designed to mature below slumping temp. I'd suggest you contact them and ask their technical staff what they would recommend for your project. Phone: 970-346-8577


Good luck with your project.

Avery

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Sat Apr 10, 2004 11:13 pm

Alan

Since your glass will be sealed inside a triple glaze, I think you have several options. You can use transparent enamels that fire in at 1050ºF and not bend the base glass. You can use Peebeo or similar low fire enamels. These enamels are removable with a razor blade, but since they are encapusalated, I think you are OK. The choice really depends on the look you want.

For low fires,I would also look in to Ferro's organic bottle coating colors or ICD's AquaVue colors. both are professional versions of products similar to Peebeo.

For 1050 Enamels, there is Reusche, Fusemaster, or one of the other companies that imports European transparents. Mr & Mrs somebody...
Bert

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Dani
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Postby Dani » Sat Apr 10, 2004 11:20 pm

Be careful with any of the low-fire Reusches which cure out at about 1050 degrees. The potential problem, in a sealed unit as you describe, is the risk of corrosion to the low-fire paints. When the unit leaks in 10-12 years, the combination of water vapor, dessicant, and solar can create nitric acid resulting in an etching effect. Does your painting have to be sealed in an insulated unit? Or can you check on another kind of sealed unit that is charged with an inert glass like argon which might by-pass that problem? Check with the glazing company making the units. PM us direct if you have more questions.

~Mike

Allan Gott
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Postby Allan Gott » Sun Apr 11, 2004 2:21 am

Thanks Avery, Bert and Mike(via Dani) for your responses.

Does anyone have an instance of Pebeo actually releasing from the surface over time? A local supplier maintains they have a regular customer who paints on dinnerware and glasses with it. It must be relatively durable.

Allan

Dani
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Postby Dani » Sun Apr 11, 2004 12:14 pm

"Relative" is the operative word. Do you want it to hold up ten years? Or 100? It depends on the application. With work in public buildings, it should survive, if not several generations, then at least your remaining lifetime. If there is some doubt the materials won't, I would pass on using them.


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