New to fusing - seek advice on sharper edges. - WarmGlass.com

New to fusing - seek advice on sharper edges.

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

Moderators: Tony Smith, Brad Walker

Post Reply
turi
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 10:09 pm
Location: New York City

New to fusing - seek advice on sharper edges.

Postby turi » Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:57 pm

Hi folks,
I'm new to fusing and working on an interactive glass project. If you recall a child's game of a maze mounted in a box throuh whihc you attempt to navigate a marble around a series of holes by turning two nobs, imagine this with water and glass and copper inclusions.

Since I am using water, I need to make the sides of the maze rather tall so that they channel the water. With the full fuses I have been doing, the edges channel edges are quite rounded and low. I'd like to figure out a way to stack glass about 1/2 inch high, and have it stay about that high after the fuse.

Do you have any suggestions? I've read about a tack fuse, but I am not sure how the schedule should differ from the full fuse schedule I am running now:

1:00 - 500
2:00 - 1175
3:00 - 1175 (hold)
3:01 - 1575 (jump up fast)
3:16 - 1575 (soak for 15 min)
3:17 - 1050 (down as fast as possible)
4:17 - 1050 (hold)
7:17 - 750
9:17 - 500
Off

I appreciate the help!
My best, Turi

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Postby Tony Smith » Mon Apr 12, 2004 1:13 pm

Try 1375° to 1400° instead of 1575°. That will give you a tack fuse and will leave your edges sharp.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

gone

Postby gone » Mon Apr 12, 2004 1:31 pm

How about firing it upside down and using fiber paper to make the water channels?

turi
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 10:09 pm
Location: New York City

Postby turi » Mon Apr 12, 2004 2:22 pm

Hi Els -
That sounds like a great idea! My fusing experience so far is quite limited - I've only fused flat float glass on a standard shelf. I have not used fiber paper before. I think I can picture what you are talking about - and I'd love to try - it seems like it could deliver the sort of organic shapes that I am seeking while still maintaining the deep channels.

Could you give me some pointers on how I might go about doing this? Or do you know of a book or website that might list the salient details?

Best regards, Turi


Hi Tony,
Thank you for the suggestion on fusing temperatures! I'll try that for a tack fuse.

Best regards, Turi

Steve Immerman
Posts: 208
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Eau Claire, Wisconsin
Contact:

Postby Steve Immerman » Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:34 pm

Els has a good idea. You might be able to cut ceramaguard or some similar product to do this.

Steve

Bert Weiss
Posts: 2337
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 12:06 am
Location: Chatham NH
Contact:

Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:21 pm

When I read this, I got the same idea as Els except making dams with fiber paper and firing right side up. There is an issue either way with annealing as the fiber paper is an insulator. If you did the same thing with plaster/silica inserts, you would still have an annealing challenge only slightly different as the plaster is less insulating and more heat conducting.

Another approach could be to make the maze seperately, using dams, and tack fuse it on like Ron Coleman does his boxes, using a low temp flux to get it to stick at a relatively low temp. Or glue the 2 pieces together.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
http://www.customartglass.com
Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware
Architectural Commissions

turi
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 10:09 pm
Location: New York City

Postby turi » Mon Apr 12, 2004 6:06 pm

Hi Bert,
Thanks for the suggestion! I looked up Ron Coleman's work - the Red Treasure is lovely! I may try a number of these ideas. For joining the maze to the base, I'd imagine hxtal would be the adhesive.

Is there a brand name for low temperatre flux that I might search for, or a formula for it's creation?

Thanks! Turi

Bert Weiss
Posts: 2337
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 12:06 am
Location: Chatham NH
Contact:

Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Apr 12, 2004 6:58 pm

turi wrote:Hi Bert,
Thanks for the suggestion! I looked up Ron Coleman's work - the Red Treasure is lovely! I may try a number of these ideas. For joining the maze to the base, I'd imagine hxtal would be the adhesive.

Is there a brand name for low temperatre flux that I might search for, or a formula for it's creation?

Thanks! Turi


Turi

I think the simplest no minimum place to get flux is probably Standard Ceramic in Pittsburgh. Ask for their lowest temp flux, probably 1050ºF. 412/276-6333, I think.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions


Post Reply

Return to “Techniques and Tools”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 57 guests

Warm Glass

2575 Old Glory Road, Suite 700
Suite 700
Clemmons, NC 27012
Phone: (336) 712 8003
Email: wg@warmglass.com