polishing - WarmGlass.com

polishing

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

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Tamara Baskin
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Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2003 11:50 pm

polishing

Postby Tamara Baskin » Sun Apr 18, 2004 10:02 am

I would like suggestions as to the correct equipment used to polish the bottom dull side of fused bowls coming out of the kiln.
Tamara baskin

Brock
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Location: Vancouver, B.C.

Re: polishing

Postby Brock » Sun Apr 18, 2004 10:14 am

Tamara Baskin wrote:I would like suggestions as to the correct equipment used to polish the bottom dull side of fused bowls coming out of the kiln.
Tamara baskin


It's very difficult, and time consuming, to polish a large curved surface like that. I suggest you sand blast the bottom of your blank prior to firing. This will give you a dull sheen on the bottom, after slumping, that is more resistant to marks and fingerprints than unfired sandblasting. Brock
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Bert Weiss
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Re: polishing

Postby Bert Weiss » Sun Apr 18, 2004 11:22 am

Tamara Baskin wrote:I would like suggestions as to the correct equipment used to polish the bottom dull side of fused bowls coming out of the kiln.
Tamara baskin


The only solution I know if is to do a drop slump through an empty hole, cut off the overhang (small glass cutter or very large diamond saw), grind it flat on a lap wheel and polish it out on two or three vibralaps. Many thousands of dollars later, you can do it. See the work of Stephen Schlanser. He sometimes blasts patterns to avoid some polishing or cover blemishes.
Bert

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susan fancy
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Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan

Postby susan fancy » Mon Apr 19, 2004 3:42 pm

A duller back surface is characteristic of fused work. If you're interested in "glossy on 2 sides" work, glassblowing is a better technique.

Steve Immerman
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Postby Steve Immerman » Mon Apr 19, 2004 5:12 pm

Using Bullseye iridized glass with the irid side down, on a nice, smooth, kilnwashed shelf gives a nice bottom.

Steve

Dick Ditore
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Postby Dick Ditore » Mon Apr 19, 2004 8:45 pm

You can use a flat lap and grind the blank and polish before you slump.

Dick


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