Waste Glass/what to do with it? - WarmGlass.com

Waste Glass/what to do with it?

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

Moderators: Tony Smith, Brad Walker

Post Reply
Carla

Waste Glass/what to do with it?

Postby Carla » Thu May 01, 2003 10:47 pm

What do you all do with the bits and pieces of glass that are left over after cutting a project?

I want to be frugal, while not being a pack rat. A conumdrum.....

Currently we have 5 gallon buckets of many colored glass pieces:

Do I divide it up by color and haul it back to Bullseye so they can remelt it and turn in back into full sheets? (You can do this with precious metals and they give you a credit towards purchasing new silver, gold etc. Great idea huh Lani!?)

Do I send off to the glass recyler? Can they use this odd colored stuff?

What do the rest of you do with all those small bits and pieces of precious glass that is now too small to use for projects.

Carla
jeweler, Oregon

Marty
Posts: 852
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:58 pm
Location: Maine
Contact:

Postby Marty » Thu May 01, 2003 10:52 pm

re-melt them.

pattern bars.

"Klaus" projects.

make frit.

mosaics.

give 'em to schools.

Jackie Beckman
Posts: 475
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:01 pm
Location: Arizona
Contact:

Postby Jackie Beckman » Thu May 01, 2003 10:58 pm

"What do the rest of you do with all those small bits and pieces of precious glass that is now too small to use for projects. "


Too small??? What's too small to use? :shock:

You're supposed to send them to me to dispose of for you

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Postby Tony Smith » Thu May 01, 2003 11:31 pm

If it's compatible, then there's no such thing as waste... make your own multi-colored sheet as thick as you want.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Steve Immerman
Posts: 208
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Eau Claire, Wisconsin
Contact:

Postby Steve Immerman » Sun May 04, 2003 8:50 am

Also,

Pot melts

Make stringers and murrini out of them in glory hole

Make beads with a torch

Steve

Sara
Posts: 89
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 9:56 pm
Location: Magdalena, New Mexico, USA

Postby Sara » Sun May 04, 2003 9:02 am

Steve Immerman wrote:Make stringers and murrini out of them in glory hole

Make beads with a torch

Steve


Make certain to add Paperweights and Marbles and kiln formed beads to the list :wink:

Sara

lyndasglass
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2003 6:41 pm
Location: Salem Oregon
Contact:

Postby lyndasglass » Mon May 05, 2003 5:57 pm

In regards to what to do with scrap glass. I teach at the local Community College that has a stained glass and fusing program. They were just throwing their glass in the trash. Here in Oregon all the schools are hurting for funding, special projects, etc.

To make a short story long, I have contacted schools in our area and let the art teachers and after school programs instructor know that I have scrap glass availible. I keep a list of all the teachers interested and when I haul the scrap home from the Community College I call the next one on my list to see if they are interested in it. Most of them are Thrilled to get it. They use it for mosaic projects.

It really is a good thing for all concerned. The College gets good publicity, the schools get material for art projects that doesn't cost them anything, and the glass doesn't end up in the landfills.

Plus it makes me feel good to be able to facilitate this whole thing. :D

Lynne Chappell
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Mar 14, 2003 2:05 am
Location: Surrey B.C. Canada
Contact:

Postby Lynne Chappell » Wed May 07, 2003 1:16 am

Scrap fusing glass??? There's no such thing!!

Truly, I have a bunch of trays (actually just cut off bottoms of cardboard boxes, about 2" deep) on shelves under my table and the pieces get put in there by color - not a tray for each color, but for similar colors or ones that I am apt to use together. I couldn't work without my boxes of scraps.

Peg
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2003 7:50 am
Location: Bristol, UK

Postby Peg » Wed May 07, 2003 7:42 am

Tony Smith wrote:If it's compatible, then there's no such thing as waste... make your own multi-colored sheet as thick as you want.

Tony


OK - say I want to make a 5-6mm thick sheet from scrap Bullseye (dimensions 1 - 20mm by 3mm thick). How hot/how long do I fire to get a nicely flat sheet, assuming a very approximately even layer of scraps 2 sheets deep?
(answers in centigrade please if poss!)

Dani
Posts: 493
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:17 pm
Contact:

Postby Dani » Wed May 07, 2003 2:34 pm

What if it's not compatible?.... I ask this because I still wonder how regular non-art industrial glasses can be recycled. Surely those glass are hopelessly incompatible and yet they are all re-melted together. And produce a stable new end-product. So, is it a function of the high heat that overcomes the inherent incompatability? And wouldn't that work with art glasses if the temperatures were high enough in the re-melting process? If this theory holds any merit, what would that high temperature be? And could we not then use any of our scraps to make, for example, those cool pot melts? Eh? :?: :idea:

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Postby Tony Smith » Wed May 07, 2003 3:09 pm

Peg, you should be able to fuse an equivalent amount of small pieces together at 1550°F (845°C) for 30 minutes. Hold on the way up at 1200°F (650°C) for 30 to 45 minutes or use Lynne's method of slow climb of 50°/hr (27°C/hr) from 1150° to 1250°F (620°C to 676°C)

Bullseye's Working Deep tipsheet can give you a general idea of how to dam the edges so they stay square. http://www.bullseyeconnection.com/pdfs/ ... eet_03.pdf

I'm sure others have different firing schedules, but this has worked for me.

Dani, I think most of the non-art glass that is recycled these days gets crushed up and used as fill for roads and other non-traditional glass uses.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Ginger Schaefer

Postby Ginger Schaefer » Thu May 08, 2003 7:15 pm

Save up your scrap, then donate it to the schools. We just did a school-wide fusing for Art in Action-(1200 2"x2" mosaic tiles). The kids (k-5) loved it. I should be posting some pictures and more about those involved pretty soon.

Personally, I use my edge pieces and make cool looking trays and what-not. The wavey edges add a beautiful abstract element to those pieces.

Have fun!

Ginger

Cynthia

Postby Cynthia » Thu May 08, 2003 8:16 pm

Dani wrote:What if it's not compatible?.... I ask this because I still wonder how regular non-art industrial glasses can be recycled. Surely those glass are hopelessly incompatible and yet they are all re-melted together. And produce a stable new end-product. So, is it a function of the high heat that overcomes the inherent incompatability? And wouldn't that work with art glasses if the temperatures were high enough in the re-melting process? If this theory holds any merit, what would that high temperature be? And could we not then use any of our scraps to make, for example, those cool pot melts? Eh? :?: :idea:


I think they are melted together, blended and become homogenized so to speak. Don't know much of anything about hot glass, but don't they mix batches frequently without much regard to c.o.e.? All the different parts come together to make a whole of the same thing?

It wouldn't work with pot melts because the glasses don't truly mix, but get layed down on the shelf side by side or layered.

Just my guess from what little I know about hot glass, not based in actual knowlege...except for how pot melts work :|

Brad Walker
Site Admin
Posts: 1346
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2003 9:33 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA
Contact:

Postby Brad Walker » Thu May 08, 2003 8:35 pm

Coefficient of expansion is a major consideration for furnace glass workers, too. Most people start with a batch of a known COE and add other chemicals to achieve a final product that works at the desired COE. Mixing unknown scraps together is less common than you would think, and doing it to achieve a given COE requires considerable knowledge and skill. This article will give you some idea of the batch modifications required with recycled glass: http://www.cwc.org/glass/gl965.htm

There's a reason they call it glass chemistry.

Ron Coleman
Posts: 468
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 3:20 pm
Location: Columbus, Ohio USA

Postby Ron Coleman » Thu May 08, 2003 8:54 pm

A little more about glass recycling from The Glass Packaging Institute.

http://www.gpi.org/Handling.html

This is all about container glass and how it's used.

Ron

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Postby Tony Smith » Thu May 08, 2003 8:57 pm

That was a great link Brad. The report is enlightening. It would be interesting to see if they actually went into production using post consumer glass.

I found it interesting a couple years ago when I took a tour of the Spectrum factory to note that they gave away tones of glass regularly to companies that used it as aggregate in road surfacing. They had a hopper set up that dump trucks could drive under and be filled with their waste glass from production. I imagine if their glass could have been recycled, they would have.

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Brian and Jenny Blanthorn
Posts: 353
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 5:25 pm
Location: UK
Contact:

Re: Waste Glass/what to do with it?

Postby Brian and Jenny Blanthorn » Fri May 09, 2003 3:59 am

Carla wrote:What do you all do with the bits and pieces of glass that are left over after cutting a project?

I want to be frugal, while not being a pack rat. A conumdrum.....

Currently we have 5 gallon buckets of many colored glass pieces:

Do I divide it up by color and haul it back to Bullseye so they can remelt it and turn in back into full sheets? (You can do this with precious metals and they give you a credit towards purchasing new silver, gold etc. Great idea huh Lani!?)

Do I send off to the glass recyler? Can they use this odd colored stuff?

What do the rest of you do with all those small bits and pieces of precious glass that is now too small to use for projects.

Carla
jeweler, Oregon


We R using ours 4 putting arround plants / later in2 paths gravel / concrete

Put the glass in2 a rociprolap / concrete mixer + grit / sand

This will knock the edges off

Try also just by itself
Image

Greg Rawls
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:11 pm
Location: Charleston, SC
Contact:

Postby Greg Rawls » Fri May 09, 2003 6:59 pm

Here's what I do with scrap. "Circular Reference" and "Urban Forest" were both made with "scrap."

http://www.gregorieglass.com/glass_latest.htm
Greg

Tony Smith
Posts: 1037
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:59 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Postby Tony Smith » Fri May 09, 2003 7:25 pm

Way to go Greg! Let's here it for scrap! =D>

Tony
The tightrope between being strange and being creative is too narrow to walk without occasionally landing on both sides..." Scott Berkun

Britestar
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu May 08, 2003 11:36 am

Postby Britestar » Fri May 09, 2003 10:00 pm

I cut up the glass scraps in roughly quarter sized pieces and cast them in kiln washed ceramic flower pot drip trays, then slump them into bowls or plates, or include them as prefused elements in fused pieces.


Post Reply

Return to “Techniques and Tools”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 16 guests

Warm Glass

2575 Old Glory Road, Suite 700
Suite 700
Clemmons, NC 27012
Phone: (336) 712 8003
Email: wg@warmglass.com

cron