Enamel terms - WarmGlass.com

Enamel terms

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S.TImmerman
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Enamel terms

Postby S.TImmerman » Wed Jun 06, 2012 5:32 am

I'm in the process of buying some enamels from Reusche and I tried to search the archives but no luck. I'm confused at some of the terms they use ..

I know an Over-glaze can be a devit spray but what are "over-glaze colors" They have a nice color pallet but how does that term mean referring to enamels?

"Blendable bending" colors that you can blend??

When would you use "alkaline resist " enamels? These are also Blendable.

and finally " Blendable Low Expansion Colors" Low Expansion??
http://www.reuscheco.com/ColorCharts.asp
Thank you so much

Don Burt
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Re: Enamel terms

Postby Don Burt » Wed Jun 06, 2012 8:33 am

I never have understood exactly what 'bending' problem Reusche is solving with their Bendable Blending colors. Or how they are different from their glass stainer's color. Or who the target market is for Bending colors for that matter. Maybe for lettering or decorating on float that is then formed or bent? Reusche is one of those companies that's really good at not effectively selling to us. Their low-expansion colors would be for borosilicate glass. Their alkaline resistant colors would be colors that can withstand dishwashing detergent (alkaline). The tacit implication is that they don't withstand acid.

There is some information and terminology discussion here that might help.
http://www.burtglass.com/glass_enamel_faq.htm

Bert Weiss
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Re: Enamel terms

Postby Bert Weiss » Wed Jun 06, 2012 10:41 am

Overglaze or onglaze colors are ones with clear glass flux mixed in, so they present a glossy surface. Underglaze colors do not have the glass mixed in. These colors need to be coated with a clear overglaze. Overglaze or onglaze colors are the ones that work well on glass. The pottery colors generally mature somewhere in the 1400'sºF, where depends on whether they are low lead of lead free. Even the low lead colors are designed for use on dinnerware.

Low expansion colors are designed for marking borosilicate, like the red print in pyrex measuring cups (when they were actually made with borosilicate glass) My guess is that these colors will work on higher expansion glasses, because the layer of color is so thin.

The big deal with bending colors is that the color will stretch. If you have ever worked with either colored micas or real gold, you will notice that as the glass stretches, the colors crack apart because they have no ability to stretch along with the glass. The onglaze style colors do have the ability to stretch. As it gets thinner, the colors get weaker, so to be a good bending color, it must have a very dense look.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
http://www.customartglass.com
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Valerie Adams
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Re: Enamel terms

Postby Valerie Adams » Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:31 pm

Call and talk to them; I've had great customer service when I've explained what I'm trying to do.

S.TImmerman
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Re: Enamel terms

Postby S.TImmerman » Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:30 am

Thank you so much, all this information helped explain a lot. I want a black paint (opaque) for everything from line painting to airbrushing and would love to know what you ll use. Tracing black or best black or another? Id like to go lead free . I will call them but I really would like to know from your experience which one you all use.

Thank you so much!
Shereen

Bert Weiss
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Re: Enamel terms

Postby Bert Weiss » Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:24 am

S.TImmerman wrote:Thank you so much, all this information helped explain a lot. I want a black paint (opaque) for everything from line painting to airbrushing and would love to know what you ll use. Tracing black or best black or another? Id like to go lead free . I will call them but I really would like to know from your experience which one you all use.

Thank you so much!
Shereen
I was taught to use Reusche's Stencil Black by Albin Elskus. Today I use Ferro Sunshine series onglaze colors. This black is designed to gloss around 1380ºF and is good up to around 1520ºF. I am not clear on whose colors Reusche is carrying these days. If they don't have the Ferro, they have a competitor. Choosing a temperature range is really the most important consideration.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

S.TImmerman
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 9:23 am
Location: San Diego ,Ca

Re: Enamel terms

Postby S.TImmerman » Sun Jun 10, 2012 2:10 am

Thank you for responding. - I will check their paints as well

I have a gift Certificate form them and I would like to get a good black - I just know the difference ( Series "5" Lead and Cadmium Free Colors) the difference between "Best Black" "tracing black" and "tracing Black Best"

When I can talk again I'll call them - Does anyone have any opinions about which black? i will be drawing with it, matting, airbrushing and maybe silkscreen , I just want a good all around black. I will be getting a few other colors in the series,

Thanks s much!
Shereen

Don Burt
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Re: Enamel terms

Postby Don Burt » Mon Jun 11, 2012 2:29 pm

I'll repeat what Bert suggested: think about what temperature you want to work primarily. Thats job one. Will you be going to fusing tempereatures with the paint? Then consider the other constraints:
Do you want to serve food on the painted surface?
Can you deal with lead and cadmium powder in your studio air and cleanup water or solvents?
Do you want it to endure in a cathedral window for 1500 years?
Do you want to spray it, screen it, trace it, slip trail it, or trace it with a pointed brush or potentially all techniques and more?

The subtle color differences between 'Best Black', 'Stencil Black', 'Tracing Black' and the half dozen other blacks they have would be secondary in my mind. Presumably stained glass restorers and china painters care deeply about such things.

I think if you call Reusche, talk to Eric Wagg and give him the information, he'll give you a good recommendation. Can you tell us what the answer is when you finally get it?


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