Slumping technique question - WarmGlass.com

Slumping technique question

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paulas
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Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:43 pm

Slumping technique question

Postby paulas » Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:29 pm

Hello to all.

As a new artist and being brand new to glass, I have done quite a bit of research on glass, but nothing can replace experience. So, I have looked for local glass artists offering classes. Well, apparently this area is a virtual glass class desert. I guess I am going to have to travel to attend a good class.

I have a question about a small glass design I want to make as part of a larger recycle project. I am sure everyone has seen the wind chimes (just an example) with rings made from wine bottle slices. But those slices are usually very irregularly shaped and the sides are flat, I believe from being slumped on a kiln shelf.

However, I have seen a few of these rings that have maintained their circular shape and are not quite as flat on the sides (see large rings in attached image). Is this the result of less time in the kiln or an artist who is very experienced with slumping?

I thank all for any input offered.

Paula
Attachments
Example of rings.jpg
Sample of well shaped rings

rosanna gusler
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby rosanna gusler » Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:26 pm

less kiln time and the rings were nice and thin to start with. if you are going to be cutting glass on a tile saw do not forget to wear a dust mask or respirator. last time i forgot to do that my chest felt like i had pneumonia for a week. rosanna
artist, owner of wanchese art studio, marine finisher

paulas
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby paulas » Wed Dec 05, 2012 1:13 am

Rosanna,

Thanks for your input. Less kiln time, and very thin rings. I see.

I found great image that is an example of what I am talking about (see the necklace). How are they getting both sides of the ring round?

Thanks again

Paula S
Attachments
recycled-glass-bottle-necklace.jpg
Rings are round on both sides. How?

Valerie Adams
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Valerie Adams » Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:38 am

paulas wrote:I found great image that is an example of what I am talking about (see the necklace). How are they getting both sides of the ring round?

Have you asked the artist?

Judd
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Location: Arkansas

Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Judd » Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:37 pm

I've thought about that too. You could try a plaster mold. That would offer round edges on all sides, but the mold side would be rough.

It's good to copy others' work to begin learning about glass, but it's better to create own, unique, styles and methods when you begin selling to customers.

Morganica
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Morganica » Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:05 pm

Lots and lots of ways to get there. The easiest would be to simply lampwork the rings out of rod, with a bench torch. Or you could form them from scratch in a hotshop with a punty, or cut your bottle rings and then firepolish them in the gloryhole (doing fast work to keep them round). Or you could slump into a mold, as Judd suggests. Or cast them with a ceramic or plaster/silica mold.

If they have the same glossy surface on all sides, they're most likely hot-formed. If one side has a less-shiny/more-textured finish, they're more likely kilnformed. You could also kilnform them and then coldwork the result back to an even, glossy finish all over...but that means a heck of a lot more work and/or additional equipment.

In other words, if you want the same glossy finish on all surfaces, there's gonna be a learning curve. ;-)
Cynthia Morgan
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Mark Wright
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Mark Wright » Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:09 pm

paulas wrote:
this area is a virtual glass class desert. I guess I am going to have to travel to attend a good class.

Paula


Where are you located?

rosanna gusler
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby rosanna gusler » Wed Dec 05, 2012 5:26 pm

i think that they juse LOOK round. those look kiln worked to me. i would guess really thin rings fused hot on really smooth kiln wash. rosanna
artist, owner of wanchese art studio, marine finisher

JestersBaubles
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby JestersBaubles » Wed Dec 05, 2012 11:37 pm

Many of us live in a "glass desert". Much of learning is picking up the basics (reading, classes, videos, etc.), and then experiment, experiment, experiment!

Dana W.

paulas
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby paulas » Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:28 pm

Wow, thank you all for the great input!

Cynthia, I have read many of your posts in other threads, and as usual you gave some very helpful info. I had to look up what a glory hole was. I never thought about that technique. Using rods was interesting, too.

As Judd mentioned, if a mold was used, or even slumping on a kiln shelf, one side would be flat. I was struggling with figuring out (with my very limited knowledge) how that might work.

Oh, and Mike, I live in Palm Springs, CA.

Well, lots to think about on my journey into glass.

Paula

JestersBaubles
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby JestersBaubles » Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:00 am

paulas wrote:
As Judd mentioned, if a mold was used, or even slumping on a kiln shelf, one side would be flat. I was struggling with figuring out (with my very limited knowledge) how that might work.

Paula


I would argue "not necessarily". If the bottom of the mold were concave then that side would not be flat and the top side would still round out some.

Of course, that would likely be an expensive mold for inexpensive bottle glass.

Dana W.

David Jenkins
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby David Jenkins » Sun Dec 09, 2012 10:28 am

paulas wrote:
... However, I have seen a few of these rings that have maintained their circular shape and are not quite as flat on the sides (see large rings in attached image). Is this the result of less time in the kiln or an artist who is very experienced with slumping? ...

Paula


Hmmm ... still a puzzle to me. First of all, those rings in the first image do not look perfectly circular to me. Nor is their circular cross-section a consistent size. In addition, the diameters of the rings vary significantly - do you think they were cut from bottles? Also, it's hard to tell what the "back" looks like - is it smooth/glossy? Textured?

In the first image, the rings look "notched" at various points around their circumfrences - from whence sprangeth those, do you suppose?

And finally, Paula, you mention "slumping" the rings. I'm thinking you're talking about fire-polishing them after they've been cut from a bottle - is that correct?

I, too, would like to know how to make perfectly circular rings with consistent circular cross-sections and a gloss finish, but the process sounds too daunting to me. Good luck - hope you figure it out.
Dave Jenkins
Glass at Harbor Gates
Cypress, TX

Felicia Poes
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Felicia Poes » Mon Dec 10, 2012 5:18 pm

Mark Wright wrote:
paulas wrote:
this area is a virtual glass class desert. I guess I am going to have to travel to attend a good class.

Paula


Where are you located?

If you don't mind the traveling and the expense, I highly recommend Corning Museum of Glass Studio classes. They have 1 and 2 week intensive classes geared for travelers with a hotel and meals you can walk to. They are 12 hour days. I am fortunate and live nearby. I will be taking an intensive class on mold making and casting in January and another on using recycled and float glass in February. I've also take weekend classes which are just 2 6 hour days and I am finishing my 10 week night class this week. Its pricey but includes all materials and firings.

Felicia Poes
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Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Felicia Poes » Mon Dec 10, 2012 5:23 pm

Judd wrote:I've thought about that too. You could try a plaster mold. That would offer round edges on all sides, but the mold side would be rough.


Those could be cut from wine bottles. I wonder if one of those flower making molds would work. The kind with the hump in the center, assuming the ring would fit around the hump. I bought a round bead mold to melt bottle necks into but the manufacturer says not to use bottle glass in it. I'm not sure why.

Judd
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Location: Arkansas

Re: Slumping technique question

Postby Judd » Mon Dec 10, 2012 6:12 pm

Yes, I'd guess the glass was wine bottle, and cut into rings on a saw, but I wouldn't buy a mold. Just make one out of plaster. Find some plastic, donut shaped thing and make a plaster mold out of it. KISS = Keep It Short and Simple.

paulas
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:43 pm

Re: Slumping technique question

Postby paulas » Mon Dec 10, 2012 9:19 pm

Oh my. Me thinks this will take some time to figure out.

Just FYI, I do not know if the image in my second post, the necklace, was from bottle glass.

Taking a class or two at the Corning Museum of Glass would surely put me far, far ahead in my glass knowledge. I will add that to my want list along with a flat lap grinder and a few other items I will eventually get.

I am surprised that some responses have suggested a mold. I am anxious to locate a kiln I can use, perhaps in a class. At lease then I can test and learn, not just wonder.

Thank you again for your input.

Paula

tgotch
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Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:04 pm

Re: Slumping technique question

Postby tgotch » Mon Dec 17, 2012 11:03 pm

Paulas,
I did this with some vodka and wine bottles. I simply sliced them with my saw, and took them to an area glass studio that rents their kilns. They placed them on the shelf and fired them for me. I don't recall what the schedule was. Once they were done, the tops were round, and the backs were flat. I had to cold work them to get a nice surface on the back. I was making some necklaces out of them. Turned out to be too much work, and didn't sell a lot.

Many pieces didn't come out right. some I cut too thick (and rolled over), some too thin and just looked bad...We tried a few things (spray with borax, cold working before firing), but success was minimal. I could not find a common method and got tired of paying for kiln rental (Although I just purchased my first kiln). I may now revisit this when I get time.


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