What's selling? Survey Says! - WarmGlass.com

What's selling? Survey Says!

The forum for discussion on business aspects of working with glass.

Moderator: Brad Walker

Post Reply
Andrew
Posts: 46
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2003 1:39 pm
Location: Minnesota
Contact:

What's selling? Survey Says!

Postby Andrew » Fri Nov 21, 2003 11:05 am

I've had trouble selling bowls or plates here in the Midwest. I've had great success selling my pendant beads which account for about 85% of my sales for the past season.

I was just wondering, in a totally unscientific way, what have you seen selling this past season? It would be helpful to know what area of the country (or other country) you are talking about.

Andrew

starchimes (Andrea)
Posts: 26
Joined: Tue May 20, 2003 11:39 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Postby starchimes (Andrea) » Fri Nov 21, 2003 11:59 am

My sales have been down lately. I usually make fused wind chimes and suncatchers. All my sales come from ebay and through my website. I have just been trying my hand at pendants. Sold a few. I talked to a local gallery which only sells glass art, their sales have been way down in the past 6 months. Most of their revenue is coming from supplies and classes in the studio.

Geri Comstock
Posts: 340
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: Northern CA
Contact:

Postby Geri Comstock » Mon Nov 24, 2003 2:25 pm

I'm surprised more people haven't responded to this.

What I've been hearing from many artists on the circuit is that sales are down this year. People who buy are mostly buying inexpensive items.

My jewelry sales have also been strong this year. Even when economic times are tough, people still want something pretty to wear.

Geri

Cynthia

Postby Cynthia » Mon Nov 24, 2003 4:01 pm

After two years of slow sales, things have finally started to pick up. Larger ticket items (for me anyway) in the range of $700.00 to $1200.00 are the most in demand, and then the coaster sets at $60.00. Anything in between these extremes seem to still be sitting around and there's no requests for them from my galleries. Still, things could be better, and have been in the past. I still have too much time on my hands.

I wholesale these items and these are the retail prices. I get half.

Commissioned 2-D work for private parties have really picked up for me... window and in particular wall pieces in the range of $800.00 to $2500.00. Nothing more than that so far though this year. With the winter holidays approaching, the gifty type coasters are in demand and are keeping me busy, but they don't pay as well for the amount of work as the larger pieces, and these approach a production product... If I was willing to do more production work (coasters come the closest to production that I do), I would be doing better with sales (lower cost per item, faster production...different market), but I'm just not good at it.

I'm in Utah.

K Okahashi
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 7:29 pm
Location: Washington

Postby K Okahashi » Mon Nov 24, 2003 4:02 pm

I can't say that sales have slowed for me this year as I have sold more than I have in the past. The majority of my sales is wholesale jewelry in California and Hawaii, then commission work (sconces, panels, mirrors, special plates) then plates and platters.

I agree with Geri- it's the inexpensive stuff selling on the retail end right now.

Judd
Posts: 291
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 9:45 am
Location: Arkansas

Postby Judd » Mon Nov 24, 2003 5:30 pm

This is only my second year at selling my art. Last year, I would sell one large item a week, and several (10 to 20) small items, but this year I have sold one large item a month, and 20-25 small items.

My jewelry and my smallest suncatchers seem to be my best selling works.

Judd

Judd
Posts: 291
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 9:45 am
Location: Arkansas

Postby Judd » Mon Nov 24, 2003 5:31 pm

Oh, and I had a lady trade me a plane ticket for a large work. So, I flew my mom down for Thanksgiving.

Judd

Carol Silrum
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2003 11:16 am
Location: Calif

Postby Carol Silrum » Mon Nov 24, 2003 6:59 pm

I am new at this posting stuff, but just wanted to add my 2 cents on this subject.

I sell only jewelry and my sales are only slightly down here in Calif. But they did very well back East this year. I sell wholesale or consignment to galleries. I just got off the phone with Studio 41 in Benicia and Leah said they have had "a good November so far" -- though she did add, "you just never know how it is going to go!"

In agreement with Geri -- people will always pay for something that is pretty or different.

Good luck to us all and Happy Holidays! :D

Jerry

What Sells

Postby Jerry » Mon Nov 24, 2003 7:33 pm

I don't think there's a right answer here, and certainly no unversal one. The month after 9/11 I sold more than I had in any other single month. Then it all fell apart. This summer I broke all my sales records even though it was a lot of small stuff.

Seems like I can always sell Jewelry. I make "dot" earrings from encased dichroic and glue them onto backings. The durn things fly out the door. I also make a wide variety of wire art and glass hangings at as much as $50 each; have to do something with the pot melts that didn't behave. Just filled a museum shop order with them and have people buying them off the rack almost daily.

We just finished up our last commission window for the season and have one in for restoration at $4,000! That's going to keep us eating through January.

When I opened this business I was warned about diversification; DON'T! Talk about terrible advice. We do as many things here as we can so we have a wide variety of styles and price ranges for everyone.

Probably doesn't help too much, but it's better than describing how to slump a wine bottle, and they sell too.

Jerry

Terry Ow-Wing
Posts: 124
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 3:21 pm
Location: San Francisco, Ca.
Contact:

Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Mon Nov 24, 2003 11:40 pm

What ever you have the most of does not sell - what ever you have the least of sells!....Last weekend I sold high end items - surprised me, just this past week I sold my middle range - running out of stuff. During the past June till October I thought I was going to die with down sales - now I'm up. What's up is down and what's down is up.....as I end up talking with other artist if we really knew we would NOT be having this conversation...just stick with what is truly yours and be happy with that!
Last edited by Terry Ow-Wing on Tue Nov 25, 2003 4:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
Image

Andrew
Posts: 46
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2003 1:39 pm
Location: Minnesota
Contact:

Chasing Markets

Postby Andrew » Tue Nov 25, 2003 1:18 am

I agree with Terry. It is a terrible idea to go chasing markets because you can never really get ahead of the curve and end up doing nothing that you want to own up to.

In part I'm curious about the geographic market. Here in the upper midwest my ability to sell anything at the upper end has just been barren. Now I'm the first to admit that maybe it's the art . . .my art that is . . .although I get dozens of those "just beautiful work" comments at every show. But I've only been able to keep fusing away because I've managed to sell enough of the low end production pieces.

I think the coasts are a different world, different culture, maybe even different genetics.

Andy

Marty
Posts: 852
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:58 pm
Location: Maine
Contact:

Postby Marty » Tue Nov 25, 2003 8:29 am

I just finished 3 top shows in the northeast. These are high-end retail shows- for example, my stuff starts at $400 and goes to $2200, and I'm probably in the middle range at these shows. Sales at the Philadelphia Museum show were disappointing for lots of people- mine were down by half from last year. I sold one piece at the Westchester County (NY) show. On the other hand , the Washington DC show was great with almost all the sales at the high end- they took the best work first.
Of course I'd loaded up on the smaller, less expensive stuff- more proof for the Ow-Wing Theorem.

Terry Ow-Wing
Posts: 124
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 3:21 pm
Location: San Francisco, Ca.
Contact:

Postby Terry Ow-Wing » Tue Nov 25, 2003 1:31 pm

I do think that one of my "sucesses" is that I carry a very broad range of items. I'm almost retail only so carrying many different items is feasable. I think if you are mostly wholesale you need to concentrate on fewer items with good quality at quantity numbers. My range goes from tiny 12.00 earrings to 1200.00 plates. Sometimes I go crazy but even that can be interesting at times. The real down side is that displaying so many different items can get very messy and I'm sure some people get overload. I've had clients come in and say Oh this is new - ....on an item I've had for 3+ years. They just did not see it beyond what they could focus on. Sorry no quick, easy, perfect formulas to offer. But's its the challenge and travel to create that is the true inspiration. :D
Terry Ow-Wing Designs
Kilnformed and Lampworked Glass Art
http://GlassArt.weebly.com
Image

jim simmons
Posts: 454
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 10:37 pm
Location: Hillsboro Oregon
Contact:

Postby jim simmons » Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:32 pm

Terry, I completely agree. My sweety had been telling me lately that we "have to much stuff" on display. When we went back and checked on what sold at each event, it turned out that there was no one thing. It was across the spectrum of $40.00 and under, although a lot of customers bought more than one item.
Jim



Terry Ow-Wing wrote:I do think that one of my "sucesses" is that I carry a very broad range of items. I'm almost retail only so carrying many different items is feasable. I think if you are mostly wholesale you need to concentrate on fewer items with good quality at quantity numbers. My range goes from tiny 12.00 earrings to 1200.00 plates. Sometimes I go crazy but even that can be interesting at times. The real down side is that displaying so many different items can get very messy and I'm sure some people get overload. I've had clients come in and say Oh this is new - ....on an item I've had for 3+ years. They just did not see it beyond what they could focus on. Sorry no quick, easy, perfect formulas to offer. But's its the challenge and travel to create that is the true inspiration. :D

Dani
Posts: 493
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:17 pm
Contact:

Postby Dani » Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:35 pm

I've never felt too hampered designing for a certain market. I figure, if I'm really creative, I can please them and me both. Last year, the only item that was really a smash hit for us was anything with a peace theme, from $5 - $2,000. Sold like hotcakes and it was a good thing because it was the only thing I really was inspired to promote. It helps if you like working in themes with tight design parameters.

Jack Bowman
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 10:52 pm
Location: Utah
Contact:

Postby Jack Bowman » Thu Nov 27, 2003 1:44 am

Along the lines of this topic... I've heard of a publication, Profitable Glass Quarterly. Has anybody seen this? Do you feel it is worthwhile for warm glass?

Jack

Jerry

Profitable stained glass

Postby Jerry » Thu Nov 27, 2003 10:54 am

Have the magazine, it's okay but I doubt if I'll renew.

Jerry

Brad Walker
Site Admin
Posts: 1349
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2003 9:33 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA
Contact:

Re: Profitable stained glass

Postby Brad Walker » Thu Nov 27, 2003 12:23 pm

Jerry wrote:Have the magazine, it's okay but I doubt if I'll renew.


Exactly. If you want to subscribe to a magazine on the business side of glass, subscribe to The Crafts Report: http://www.craftsreport.com

Cynthia

Postby Cynthia » Thu Nov 27, 2003 12:37 pm

Jack Bowman wrote:Along the lines of this topic... I've heard of a publication, Profitable Glass Quarterly. Has anybody seen this? Do you feel it is worthwhile for warm glass?

Jack


Jack,

They've sent me two issues for free (who knows why...didn't ask for it). I'll give you the issue that I still have so you can see for yourself if you find it useful.

Give me a call.

Happy Thanksgiving Jack

Jack Bowman
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 10:52 pm
Location: Utah
Contact:

Postby Jack Bowman » Thu Nov 27, 2003 3:15 pm

Jerry, Brad, and Cynthia, thank you for the replies. I'll lean toward the experience and check out Crafts Report and Cynthia's free copy of PGQ.

Cynthia, It's been a while. Have you had a chance to see the show at Red Butte Garden? It ends Sunday. My first show so I was quite excited. I'll give you a call.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

I'm thankfull for the opportunity to fulfill a lifelong dream and work with warm glass.

I'm also thankfull for this great forum.

Finally, I'm thankfull that those in this forum don't nitpick spelling.

Jack


Post Reply

Return to “Business Topics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

Warm Glass

2575 Old Glory Road, Suite 700
Suite 700
Clemmons, NC 27012
Phone: (336) 712 8003
Email: wg@warmglass.com