Designing a new studio - WarmGlass.com

Designing a new studio

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Marty
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Designing a new studio

Postby Marty » Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:11 pm

I'm not sure this belongs here, it could go in Philosophy or Technique or Spab, but here goes:
Most of us shoehorn our studios into existing spaces, compromising the whole way, or are constrained by budget or real estate footprint (same thing?).
What if the kiln goddess said "here's a single building, 30'x60', in which to work and teach up to 10 students at once"?

I'm designing exactly that and am wondering what I've missed. I've got a very flexible arrangement with almost everything on locking casters, outlets for power, water and air all over, a floor drain in the (very comprehensive) cold shop. Lots of kiln and work space. I've considered traffic flow (and space for chairs at the worktables- thank you Dorothy Hafner!), natural light, cross-ventilation, sound issues etc.

What I'm asking you-all is to consider your own studios as well as the ones at which you've taken fusing workshops. What is/was missing? What would you add or change? I've researched the wishlists on this board and think I've done moderately well but I'm still wondering.

Would you-all mind another go-round?
I'm not ready to post my floor plan but may do so if this thread is productive.

Thanks,
Marty

DonMcClennen
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby DonMcClennen » Sun Aug 31, 2014 1:08 pm

Marty... sounds fabulous...assuming you've got things well covered... the two things I would add are: A gallery space where finished work can be displayed. This would be useful to promote "studio sales" and stimulate your visitors and students. Also a corner set up for students to lunch away from work, and could serve as a place to meet and discuss/present commissioned projects to clients (soft seating, library etc.).. enjoy your project and keep us posted. Don
"The Glassman"

Marty
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Marty » Sun Aug 31, 2014 1:18 pm

Don- I've got the gallery but haven't wanted to give up space for lunches although I may have to. There will be a covered, screened area outside with a picnic table, not much help in the winter though.

Valerie Adams
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Valerie Adams » Sun Aug 31, 2014 2:56 pm

Don beat me to it with the rest/eating area for students. Think of it this way; if you've got a portable type arrangement where students eat in the gallery, they'll be enjoying the art for sale and probably shop while relaxing.

A bench in the coldworking area would be helpful for changing shoes. I'm at the age where hopping on one foot while trying to pry my rubber boots on and off is more difficult than it used to be :oops:

A small area for a photo set up would be great for students to be taking quick progress photos for their notes.

I did a project for 20 first graders recently and the teacher had an Elmo projector for me to use. I did my demo on a table while the projecting the project onto a screen. When it came time to work, there wasn't a single question as it had been so easy to see every step I did. I've been in plenty of classes where all eight of us are vying for space around the demo table; a projected image would've been an advantage.

Jeanice
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Jeanice » Sun Aug 31, 2014 3:55 pm

Photography booth/area so it's always set up with lights and background. That way there is no excuse to get those pesky pics taken.

Lockers for employees and students? For boots/shoes, purses, personal property tools and safety equipment, jewelry, cell phones, etc.

Maybe have some sort of sound-proofing for the cold shop...

Small office area

Hot tub and margarita bar
Jeanice

Susanbuckler
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Susanbuckler » Sun Aug 31, 2014 10:32 pm

No studio suggestions Marty
But I'd like to be one of those 10 students
Susan
Susan Buckler
Woodstock, NY

Kevin Midgley
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Location: Tofino, British Columbia, Canada

Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Kevin Midgley » Mon Sep 01, 2014 12:13 am

Just go and buy Camp Colton.
It is all there ready to go.
Of course it would be missing Boyce........
http://www.campcolton.com/northwest-oregon-forest-re/

Marty
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Marty » Mon Sep 01, 2014 10:33 am

What every glass studio needs- "bridal dressing quarters".

Dolores
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Dolores » Wed Sep 03, 2014 1:06 am

An espresso machine and wet bar. sounds practical enough.

DOLORES

Don Burt
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Don Burt » Fri Sep 05, 2014 10:57 am

One of those rubbermaid tool sheds outside under a carport-like roof. A bench under there too, with a vice. Under a tarp if need be. There's stuff you just don't do inside. Thats where the sawhorses and kerosine cans and the leftover finishes you used on your fancy work tables go. Thats where you cut the plastic pipe, solder the copper pipe, hose-off stuff even though it's November and raining. Thats where that one student can smoke a cigarette during break.

Morganica
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Morganica » Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:36 pm

Things I forgot when redesigning my studio? The biggest is probably space for storing all the stuff that isn't directly related to making. The in-progress studio you saw when you visited is currently a disaster area, and it's mostly due having no place for:

Inventory, i.e., finished pieces
Packing and shipping supplies
Show furniture and related stuff (it's amazing how much space it takes up)
Mold library (silicone master molds and their mothershells)
Bins of refractory plaster (I buy it in palettes, 250-500lbs at a time, and it's kinda bulky...)

I'm redesigning the space now, and will probably rebuild an outside shed to contain that kind of stuff, get it OUT of the workspace. And I'm in absolute agreement about a permanent photo booth. I also do a great many process shots during a sculpt or whatnot, and it's awkward trying to hold a camera in one hand while the other one is sculpting. I've just added an arm to my tripod and a smartphone mount that will allow me to do overhead shots and videos, with a link to my iPad, mounted on the wall, so I can see what I'm shooting.

Beyond that:
Comfortable swiveling chairs with locking wheels and footrests--they don't have to have backs (although it would be nice), but shorter folks can't work very long with dangling feet. I think Bullseye's teaching facilities are fabulous...except for those tall, hard, slippery stools. I swear, the next time I take a class there I'm bringing a cushion. ;-)

For a teaching studio, I think it's essential to have some way to give students a close-up of what you're doing. It's not a problem for 3-4 students; they can crowd around the table and watch. But if you're going to have more than that, it'd be good to have either an overhead mirror or a video camera focused on your worktable with a large panel TV on the wall, so that students can stay in place and still watch your hands. We did the video solution for one class I set up awhile back, and were able to accommodate more than 30 students.

Was at the coast this weekend and talked with an artist's coop there; they made their own mirror and said it was quite effective:
teaching-mirror.jpg


The other stuff you're more likely to advise ME about, than the other way round. I'd love to see your studio plans when you're done.
Cynthia Morgan
Marketeer, Webbist, Glassist
http://www.morganica.com/bloggery
http://www.cynthiamorgan.com

"I wrote, therefore I was." (me)

Nikki ONeill
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Nikki ONeill » Mon Sep 22, 2014 12:56 pm

Marty, my cold shop is missing a very serviceable item: it's lacking a cold-working table with shallow sides, rubber matting, with a built in drain, for washing, rinsing, and angle grinding. Bullseye at Portland have one and use it with their Suhner rotifera; another tool to die for. Might also want to cordon off a sepqrqte room for plaster, compressor, and sand blasting cabinet, to keep airborne particles in check.
N

Marty
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Marty » Mon Sep 22, 2014 1:36 pm

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1 ... o_ABS.html

I've got one 6' and one 4', both with Gleco drains.
The compressor will go in a soundproofed closet at a far corner of the building, with provisions for ventilation for cooling.
The sandblaster will have to be in the cold shop but the vacuum will exhaust to the outside (as will the kiln room and the spray cabinet).
Plaster may be an issue but since I don't use it now, I'll improvise when and if.

I finally did a floor plan with movable things (I tried Sketchup but was too impatient to learn it well enough)- graph paper and foamcore was much quicker.
Current thought is for a shed roof slanted to the south with solar panels. There may be a storage loft under the high (north facing) side.

Any thoughts on ceiling height? 9 ft? 10 ft? Open to the rafters in places or not?
How about lighting? I'm used to a mix of different color fluor. tubes with halogen task lights. Any improvements on that?

DonMcClennen
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby DonMcClennen » Mon Sep 22, 2014 3:30 pm

Re: ceiling height. 9' min. 10' is better, 12' still better! If it is open to rafters you will have to insulate above the roof deck which will require higher costs. A white finished ceiling is better for good even lighting reflection & distribution.
"The Glassman"

Tom White
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Location: Houston, Texas

Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Tom White » Fri Jan 30, 2015 5:39 am

Have you considered LED lighting. Cooler running and lower power draw. Available in almost any color. Very long lasting.

Lori Schinelli
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Location: Atlanta, Georgia

Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Lori Schinelli » Sat Jan 31, 2015 8:47 am

designated parking place for the shopvacs

Mark Hall
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Mark Hall » Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:15 pm

Don't forget good ventilation, especially working with powders. I prefer a whole house fan mounted at the end of the bench, blowing out. Somewhere you can brush off your work that's filled with stuck fiber paper & such. A portable fan can be positioned to create horizontal air movement w/air coming and going.

charlie
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby charlie » Sat Feb 14, 2015 1:31 pm

[quote="Mark Hall"]Don't forget good ventilation, especially working with powders. I prefer a whole house fan mounted at the end of the bench, blowing out. Somewhere you can brush off your work that's filled with stuck fiber paper & such. A portable fan can be positioned to create horizontal air movement w/air coming and going.[/quote]

they make kitchen exhaust fans with the motor remote. i mounted a remote motor udner the roof, and dropped an 8" duct through the ceiling. i then tie-wrapped an 8" flexiduct to that, so i can put the bottom end near where i'm doing powders or flux soldering.

DonMcClennen
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Location: Ontario

Re: Designing a new studio

Postby DonMcClennen » Tue Feb 17, 2015 8:13 pm

Hey Marty.... What have you accomplished on new studio since Aug.? any photos to share? Love to see your results.
"The Glassman"

Marty
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Re: Designing a new studio

Postby Marty » Tue Feb 17, 2015 8:53 pm

Don- I've got a tentative floor plan and some exterior elevations. And an estimate. Am now looking for a less expensive way to get the space I think I deserve (1800 sq ft).
The project includes a 2 bedroom house and a detached garage with an apartment over it (and a small boat shed and a gazebo); I'm interviewing builders next week.
This is in the Portland ME area with completion scheduled for spring '16.
When the floor plan is more concrete I'll try to figure out how to post a pdf of it here.


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