About reactives - in BE glass - WarmGlass.com

About reactives - in BE glass

This forum is for questions from newcomers to kiln-forming.

Moderator: Tony Smith

Post Reply
Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:43 am

Hello everybody,
Most of the reactions of the 'reactives' generate kind of black or grey borders on the point of the connection between the 2 glasses connected.
I know that there are some reactions that create different colors, like connecting one of the greens [forgot which one] with white creates red edges.
Does anyone know what other colors can be achieved thru other color combinations? i.e. colors where the edges become color other than the usual black?
Can anybody tell me in particular which combination creates turqoise edges?

I'd be so very grateful

Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

JestersBaubles
Posts: 691
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2011 12:01 am
Location: North Logan, UT
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby JestersBaubles » Tue Sep 04, 2012 11:59 pm

I'm sure you've seen this, but I'll post it anyway :)

http://www.bullseyeglass.com/images/sto ... _glass.pdf

Unfortunately, they don't tell you what reaction to expect, so it doesn't answer your specific question.

Dana W.

haleybach
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2012 1:59 pm
Location: Austin TX

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby haleybach » Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:50 pm

Current BE catalog, page 25
Steel Blue 0146 on Reactive Cloud Opal 0009 creates a deep red or rust color reaction by the look of it, but I've never done that combo?

My Husband found the link!

http://www.bullseyeglass.com/images/sto ... _glass.pdf

Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Fri Sep 07, 2012 1:27 pm

Many thanks, Haley!
And thanks to your husband too.

I have the BE catalogue.
And I know this result of reddish 'borders'.

I still hope / wish someone will pop up with the secret of what glass creates the beautiful turqoise borders, when fused to whites - also which white it is.

Perhaps someone from BE would care to yield this secret info.

Thanks again,
Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

judith
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 8:57 am
Location: Vitrum Studio - Maryland - DC area
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby judith » Sat Sep 08, 2012 8:27 am

Hi Have,
I thini it would be helpful if you could post an image of the turquoise border you are referencing. The word "Turquoise" may not bring up the same mental image to everyone......I'm wondering if you are referrring to the reaction created wsith Dense White and French Vanilla?
judith
NEW Spring 2014 session of classes on line.......Nathan Sandberg, Richard Parrish, Martha Pfanschmidt and more!
http://www.vitrumstudio.com
http://www.judithconwayglass.com

Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Sat Sep 08, 2012 10:27 am

Dear Judith,
Unfortunately - I saw it on facebook, and I do not know how to save photos from there. Of course it was my first idea - to download the photo and ask specifically about that. Only thing I can say, is, that it was bunch of photos from a class offered at OAtka,

Perhaps it was a combination of French Vanilla and 0116 ? But I never before saw that turqoise , I am aware of a combination the yields RED [appears even in BE catalogue, as mentioned above]

Thanks,
Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

Al Bray
Posts: 42
Joined: Thu May 01, 2003 8:37 pm
Location: Lansing, Michigan
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Al Bray » Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:56 pm

Havi wrote:Dear Judith,
Unfortunately - I saw it on facebook, and I do not know how to save photos from there. Of course it was my first idea - to download the photo and ask specifically about that. Only thing I can say, is, that it was bunch of photos from a class offered at OAtka,

Perhaps it was a combination of French Vanilla and 0116 ? But I never before saw that turqoise , I am aware of a combination the yields RED [appears even in BE catalogue, as mentioned above]

Thanks,
Havi


Havi,

Could the red halo reaction you are referencing my be from the Uroboros System 96 product line?

Red Reactive Transparent 60-003-96 or Red Reactive Opal : 60-045-96, fused with F2-5333 Deep Aqua Fine & F7-2334 Turquoise Opal Mosaic frit.

If you go to the following link, and look at the picture of the 60-003-96 or 60-045-96 glass. Combined with the above two frits, this is the deepest red reaction halo I have come across.

http://www.uroboros.com/products.php?se ... tegory=251

- Al

Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Tue Sep 11, 2012 5:10 pm

DEar Al,
No, it is not Uroboros.
I never use Uroboros. THe red halo is seen very clearly on BE catalog at the link posted above by Haley. As well as at the catalogue proper.
However, what I am seeking is the turqoise halo - which will solve itself one of these days, I am sure

Thanks for your attempt

Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

Glass Fever
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 11:08 pm
Location: Chicago Suburbs
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Glass Fever » Tue Sep 11, 2012 7:07 pm

Havi, this isn't exactly what you asked for, but when I fused silver foil on BE french vanilla I got a bluish green reaction around the foil, and then brown surrounding that.

Virginia

Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Wed Sep 12, 2012 1:15 am

Thanks, Virginia,
You are right this is not what I am seeking.

However, as far as silver goes -
I was told that working with silver creates another problem - that has to do with gas fumes, and it is recomended to dedicate a special kiln for working with this metal. Is this your experience too? Do you have any particular fumes rising from the silver??? Or any other special phenomena?

I have no reason not to believe the person who told me that.
As long as you work with silver, I would appreciate your imput too .


Thanks,
Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

David Jenkins
Posts: 174
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:35 pm
Location: Cypress, Texas

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby David Jenkins » Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:47 am

I have made a few pieces using capped silver leaf, and haven't seen any untoward lasting effects in the kiln from that work. Maybe the fuming problems occur when the silver is uncapped? Or against the shelf? And if on the shelf side, would the use of Thinfire mitigate the fuming problems?
Dave Jenkins
Glass at Harbor Gates
Cypress, TX

Brad Walker
Site Admin
Posts: 1349
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2003 9:33 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Brad Walker » Wed Sep 12, 2012 12:50 pm

David Jenkins wrote:I have made a few pieces using capped silver leaf, and haven't seen any untoward lasting effects in the kiln from that work. Maybe the fuming problems occur when the silver is uncapped? Or against the shelf? And if on the shelf side, would the use of Thinfire mitigate the fuming problems?


In my experience, fumes from uncapped silver are not significant enough to create any kind of problem. However, if you fire silver in a kiln, the silver can stain the shelf and cause a reaction with future firings on the same shelf. This happens with or without thinfire. Silver fumes can also migrate from one piece to another in the same kiln at the same time, causing a reaction where one may not have been desired.

In my experience, most glass to glass reactions are brownish, not black, and reactions with copper are sometimes reddish. The color can vary from sheet to sheet of the same glass sku. In addition, reactions with silver can also produce yellow or pinkish colors.

Regarding the turquoise reaction color, I've never seen it, but would agree that what I call turquoise may not be the same as what Havi calls turquoise. A photo would help, but even a photo is no substitute for seeing the actual piece.

Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:45 pm

Brad,
I am very grateful for your response!
You are one of my better Guru's here, what you wrote about the silver fumes is exactly what I have been told.
I have only 2 small kilns at home, and I would not waste one of them for silver reactions.

There are so many other ways to work with glass - I still have so much to accomplish in the other ways, that this will be enough for me, for a long while.
I am hoping to dedicate the forthcoming holidays to some experiments , like mesh melts, boiling glass, and other techniques of making concise colors in a limited space. I pray I shall make at least part of these.

many thanks to you and all the others, from whom I learnt so much

Havi
and -
A Happy [Jewish] New Year - next Sunday night
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com

Kim Manley
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 10:00 am

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Kim Manley » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:25 pm

You can achieve a very pale blue / turquoise using copper leaf on reactive cloud. It is delicate and pale and I don't know how you'd get it on the interface between two pieces of glass (although now you've got me thinking!).
386761_2649805089802_859817260_n.jpg

Brad Walker
Site Admin
Posts: 1349
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2003 9:33 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Brad Walker » Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:00 pm

Kim Manley wrote:You can achieve a very pale blue / turquoise using copper leaf on reactive cloud. It is delicate and pale and I don't know how you'd get it on the interface between two pieces of glass (although now you've got me thinking!).


Copper leaf between reactive cloud and regular clear will turn react with the reactive cloud and turn brownish-reddish. Copper leaf will turn blue when sandwiched between any two glasses, so long as neither of the the two is a reactive or a selenium glass. But this blue color is NOT a reaction, it's just the color of the copper left behind when the leaf burns away.

haleybach
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2012 1:59 pm
Location: Austin TX

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby haleybach » Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:34 pm

Are you positive what you are looking for is a reaction?

Could it be from super fine/powdered frit?

When I lay powder directly onto thinfire, then put large frit on top of that, then cap with clear and do a tack fuse the result looks a lot like a reaction (from the top side) with the powder color forming 'halos' around the larger frit.

David Jenkins
Posts: 174
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:35 pm
Location: Cypress, Texas

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby David Jenkins » Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:07 am

Brad Walker wrote:[... In my experience, fumes from uncapped silver are not significant enough to create any kind of problem. However, if you fire silver in a kiln, the silver can stain the shelf and cause a reaction with future firings on the same shelf. ...


Brad:

Those two sentences seem a tad contradictory - can you expand on those thoughts? For instance, does your second sentence extend to capped silver?

Thanks.
Dave Jenkins
Glass at Harbor Gates
Cypress, TX

Brad Walker
Site Admin
Posts: 1349
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2003 9:33 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Brad Walker » Thu Sep 13, 2012 11:03 am

David Jenkins wrote:
Brad Walker wrote:[... In my experience, fumes from uncapped silver are not significant enough to create any kind of problem. However, if you fire silver in a kiln, the silver can stain the shelf and cause a reaction with future firings on the same shelf. ...

Those two sentences seem a tad contradictory - can you expand on those thoughts? For instance, does your second sentence extend to capped silver?.


I can see how I could have been clearer. Let me say it a different way.

As far as I know, fumes from uncapped silver won't damage the kiln. However, the silver can stain the shelf and cause a reaction on other glass with future firings. I've never seen this problem with silver sandwiched between two layers of glass, only uncapped or used on the shelf beneath the glass.

Hope that's better.

Glass Fever
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 11:08 pm
Location: Chicago Suburbs
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Glass Fever » Thu Sep 13, 2012 11:28 pm

Havi, I haven't done a whole lot of work with silver. I only have one kiln, so I use the same one for everything. I have fired silver clay a couple of times, and silver foil uncapped only once or twice. I fired the silver clay on a piece of broken shelf that I don't use for anything else. The small amount I have done hasn't caused any problems in my kiln that I have noticed.

Virginia

Havi
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 6:01 am
Location: Israel
Contact:

Re: About reactives - in BE glass

Postby Havi » Fri Sep 14, 2012 10:22 am

Thank you so much dear friends for your responses.

I am grateful, as always for the lessons taught by you.

At this point, I would rather not experiment with silver, I feel that I can very easily find other ways of achieving what I want. I bookmarked this thread, and will keep it, though.

many thanks, and again Happy [Jewish] Holidays

Havi
Haviva Z
- - - - with a smile :)

"Speed comes from the Devil" - (an Arabic proverb)
Image
http://www.havivaz.com


Post Reply

Return to “Newcomer Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests

Warm Glass

2575 Old Glory Road, Suite 700
Suite 700
Clemmons, NC 27012
Phone: (336) 712 8003
Email: wg@warmglass.com