credit where credit is due - WarmGlass.com

credit where credit is due

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Ann Demko
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credit where credit is due

Postby Ann Demko » Tue Sep 11, 2012 12:18 pm

I am in the process of designing an outdoor sculpture which will be metal and glass. I will design all components of the piece but will need help cutting some of the design elements and welding the pieces together. There will be several people involved and I would like advice on how one or does one give credit to fellow tradespersons so vital in bringing my ideas to life. Ann

Marty
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Marty » Tue Sep 11, 2012 12:22 pm

I think it depends on where you're giving credit. You sign the piece. You can thank those people on your website, in interviews (if time permits) and in print (ditto- if it's a short blurb, you won't have room for it).

Ann Demko
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Ann Demko » Tue Sep 11, 2012 2:00 pm

thanks marty

Haydo
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Haydo » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:26 am

tradesmen just want the money. peace, haydo
Life is like a raft, so be like a rat!...Challenging being a captain type rat though, going down with each ship and all!!

Marty
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Marty » Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:53 am

Some of them actually get excited about what they're working on and appreciate the credit too.

Bert Weiss
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Bert Weiss » Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:09 am

There are no hard fast rules, so you can decide where and how you choose to give credit.

I once did a collaborative stained glass window with a well known artist. He surprised and honored me when he asked me to sign it. I did not expect recognition, as he was the artist, and the image was all his. The other side of the coin was that it took my vision and skillset to make it happen.
Bert

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Morganica
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Morganica » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:13 pm

I've certainly heard from a lot of glassists irritated that the other artist didn't credit them for their part. I think my irritation level would depend on whether the work is collaborative or "by direction."

I occasionally cast glass for other sculptors, sometimes a very difficult proposition. If all I've done is work from the artist's model, they're specifying the colors and final appearance, and I'm changing their wax/clay only where necessary to facilitate casting...it's the artist's work, not mine, and I wouldn't expect credit. (A thank you would be nice, but as long as there's money involved it's not essential)

If, however, I'm sculpting the model too, or designing the colors/patterns/detail, and suggesting ways to make the glass sections better fit the artist's intent, then I consider it a collaboration. I either want credit or a lot more money. ;-)
Cynthia Morgan
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Brad Walker » Wed Sep 12, 2012 5:09 pm

Morganica wrote:I either want credit or a lot more money. ;-)


And, ideally, both.

Haydo
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Haydo » Thu Sep 13, 2012 5:11 am

Someone who is welding and grinding something to a plan is a tool not a co-creator and if he is in business as a tradesman he will not miss out on a paycheck.

peace, haydo
Life is like a raft, so be like a rat!...Challenging being a captain type rat though, going down with each ship and all!!

Jeanne
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Jeanne » Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:24 am

You make craftsmen sound like machines. Everyone wants credit/appreciation for a job well done. Maybe it won't be formal, I understand that, but talking about people's work like it's nothing it insensitive.

Haydo
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Haydo » Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:39 am

How many tradesmen do you know? peace, haydo
Life is like a raft, so be like a rat!...Challenging being a captain type rat though, going down with each ship and all!!

Jeanne
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Jeanne » Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:56 am

I know human nature. People like to be appreciated for the work they do. And I know a lot of tradespeople. My father and grandfather were tradesmen - and damn good ones.

Haydo
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Haydo » Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:33 am

I'm a tradesman, and I get paid to get the job done without the fuss. If I was to do work for someone else it would be a personal thing. I don't waste time fretting about getting a pat on the back, I am not precious like that. peace, haydo (my opinion, I'm not asking for agreement)
Life is like a raft, so be like a rat!...Challenging being a captain type rat though, going down with each ship and all!!

Morganica
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Morganica » Thu Sep 13, 2012 11:10 am

Jeanne wrote:You make craftsmen sound like machines. Everyone wants credit/appreciation for a job well done. Maybe it won't be formal, I understand that, but talking about people's work like it's nothing it insensitive.

I don't think anyone was suggesting that a tradesman's work was nothing or that they were machines. The question was whether they should be formally, publicly credited for their work, and how that should be done. Credit isn't the same as "appreciation for a job well done."
Cynthia Morgan
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Jeanne
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Jeanne » Thu Sep 13, 2012 11:31 am

Morganica wrote:
Jeanne wrote:You make craftsmen sound like machines. Everyone wants credit/appreciation for a job well done. Maybe it won't be formal, I understand that, but talking about people's work like it's nothing it insensitive.

I don't think anyone was suggesting that a tradesman's work was nothing or that they were machines. The question was whether they should be formally, publicly credited for their work, and how that should be done. Credit isn't the same as "appreciation for a job well done."



Haydo wrote:Someone who is welding and grinding something to a plan is a tool not a co-creator....

peace, haydo


I thought that statement was cold. As I said previously, I understand that recognition might not be formal. I was only addressing Haydo's remark (referring to a tradesperson as a "tool") which I have quoted above. I guess I should have placed the quote with my response so it was clear.

Brock
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Brock » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:14 pm

Well . . . maybe it's cold, but it's accurate. If you employ a tradesperson to execute your design, they shouldn't get a credit. A big thanks perhaps, but not a credit. If they educate you in what can and cannot be done in their area of expertise, if they work with you to change, or better, your design, then they should get a credit. I have used many tradespeople and sometimes they're a tool, and sometimes they're a collaborator. Huge difference . . .

Ann Demko
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Ann Demko » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:15 pm

Thank you all for your perspectives. I love it! Ann

Michele gh
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Michele gh » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:30 pm

If the trades person simply executes my design, I pay them, and thank them.
If the trades person enhances my design, through discussions prior to fabrication, I pay them, thank them, and mention them in the credits.

rosanna gusler
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby rosanna gusler » Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:39 pm

Brock wrote:Well . . . maybe it's cold, but it's accurate. If you employ a tradesperson to execute your design, they shouldn't get a credit. A big thanks perhaps, but not a credit. If they educate you in what can and cannot be done in their area of expertise, if they work with you to change, or better, your design, then they should get a credit. I have used many tradespeople and sometimes they're a tool, and sometimes they're a collaborator. Huge difference . . .

oh brock... dont be a tool... heh. sorry i just could not not say that. rosanna, occasional tool.
artist, owner of wanchese art studio, marine finisher

Ed Cantarella
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Re: credit where credit is due

Postby Ed Cantarella » Sat Mar 17, 2018 9:10 am

WHen I worked for a bronze sculptor he allowed all who worked on it to sign(basically scratch) our names on a surface where it wasn't readily seen - usually this was the underside where it would never be seen unless taken off of it's plinth. My hands (big bass player paws) were cast and attached to WIlliam Ford Jr.'s body on one piece. Credit enough for me. :lol:
HER last words were, "I'm melting, melting . . . " Dissenting opinions generally welcome for comic relief or personal edification. Sometimes both.


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