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Kilns

This is the main board for discussing general techniques, tools, and processes for fusing, slumping, and related kiln-forming activities.

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BobbieMatus
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2003 12:21 am

Re: Kilns

Postby BobbieMatus » Fri Feb 21, 2014 9:04 am

Most of the rust is by the peep hole so I'm thinking it's better to keep that closed and just crack the lid an inch. That's what I'm trying now. New top element is in, pain in the neck to do, some chipping now on top. should I use kiln cement? Kiln still needs to be rewired and I quess we will have to replace the jacket that's rusted out. Will have to be a summer job when my season is over.

Bert Weiss
Posts: 2337
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 12:06 am
Location: Chatham NH
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Re: Kilns

Postby Bert Weiss » Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:49 pm

I don't claim an extensive knowledge of metallurgy, but if there is a problem with crashing, it would have to do with oxidation, introducing fresh oxygen while the element is hot.

For a time, I crashed my kiln routinely, as recommended by the early fusers. There was definitely a point at which, I risked cooling too much, or the elements came back on. I eventually stopped doing this, with the sometimes exception of doing deep drop slumps. Even then, I have learned when to stop and just let the kiln cool on it's own. Part of the trick is to not be heating too fast, so the changes aren't happening too fast. Hindsight says not crashing is far superior to crashing, for a variety of reasons. Crashing moves dirt and dust around, and changes the rate at which the glass equalizes in temperature. The reason it was recommended to crash was to get the glass out of the devit zone quicker. Glass formulas have changed such that devit is less of a problem now than it was then, for the fusing glasses. I am usually able to avoid devit, on my float glass, by not firing too hot. So, solving a problem I don't have is a total waste.

It does sound like Bobbie's problem is related to moist salt air, which can be hard on both elements and kiln jacket.
Bert

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Jeanne
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2003 8:16 am
Location: NJ

Re: Kilns

Postby Jeanne » Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:35 pm

@ Bobbie - Per your original post... You said your kiln is 12 years old and you fire it daily - perhaps it's time to bid it adieu. The amount of time, effort and money you've spent/or may spend, to rehabilitate this kiln sounds like a lot, (are you still using the original controller?) not to mention the wear and tear on your husband. Perhaps a kiln fabricated to withstand (i.e. corrosion/rust resistant) the harsher elements is in order. Your wholesaler can probably get you what you want or if not, shop the internet. Kilns are usually drop-shipped. And don't forget that tax write-off!

BobbieMatus
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2003 12:21 am

Re: Kilns

Postby BobbieMatus » Fri Feb 21, 2014 4:04 pm

yes it is the original controller. So the real question is if I buy a new kiln which one. I would like to here from everyone which kilns they like the best.

charlie
Posts: 961
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 3:08 pm

Re: Kilns

Postby charlie » Sun Feb 23, 2014 10:52 pm

[quote="Jeanne"]@ Bobbie - Per your original post... You said your kiln is 12 years old and you fire it daily - perhaps it's time to bid it adieu. The amount of time, effort and money you've spent/or may spend, to rehabilitate this kiln sounds like a lot, (are you still using the original controller?) not to mention the wear and tear on your husband. Perhaps a kiln fabricated to withstand (i.e. corrosion/rust resistant) the harsher elements is in order. Your wholesaler can probably get you what you want or if not, shop the internet. Kilns are usually drop-shipped. And don't forget that tax write-off![/quote]

kilns typically can last 20-40 years, after replacing the things that wear out. the bricks or fiber usually don't.


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