Firing glass for jewelry.... - WarmGlass.com

Firing glass for jewelry....

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Joanne in QB
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Location: Qualicum Beach, BC

Firing glass for jewelry....

Postby Joanne in QB » Sun Oct 05, 2003 2:25 pm

I have read in GPQ that you can fire small pieces - to 2 inches across - at 1475 degrees per hour (to 1475 degrees) - that seems awfully fast. Any comments or advise?

Tom White
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Location: Houston, Texas

Postby Tom White » Sun Oct 05, 2003 2:41 pm

In my small (6"x6"x6") quickfire tabletop fiber kiln it is hard to fire slower. I use pieces of 1 1/2" square regularly to test new colors or ideas. My larger ceramic kilns will not fire that fast.

Best wishes,
Tom in Texas

Paul Tarlow
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Re: Firing glass for jewelry....

Postby Paul Tarlow » Sun Oct 05, 2003 4:14 pm

Joanne in QB wrote:I have read in GPQ that you can fire small pieces - to 2 inches across - at 1475 degrees per hour (to 1475 degrees) - that seems awfully fast. Any comments or advise?


Most kilns cannot heat up fast enough to thermal shock small (jewelry sized) pieces of glass. Likewise, most kiln naturally cool slowly enough to properly anneal small peices of glass.

One thing to beware of with very rapid heating or cooling is that it is possible to thermal shock a kiln shelf.

- Paul

Joanne in QB
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Thanks

Postby Joanne in QB » Sun Oct 05, 2003 5:49 pm

for the input - also thanks for the comment on the kiln shelf - a very good reason not to heat small pieces as fast as you can in a larger kiln.

Tim Swann
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Location: San Diego, CA

Postby Tim Swann » Sun Oct 05, 2003 6:42 pm

I have a small 8"x8"x8" kiln the has only one firing ramp "Fast". It gets to 1500°F within 60 minutes. The cool down time is about the same as a large kiln. It will give me about 3 hours between 1100°F and 900°F. The largest component I have made in this kiln is 3"x5"x1/4". I seldom have any problems with either the ramp up or ramp down. My size limiyt is caused more by the way the elemnet heats the kiln (U shaped element, front load kiln, no elementon the door).

Tim

Dani
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Postby Dani » Sun Oct 05, 2003 9:11 pm

Can you use a phaser to slow down the ramping on those itty bitty kilns?

Brock
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Postby Brock » Sun Oct 05, 2003 9:12 pm

Dani wrote:Can you use a phaser to slow down the ramping on those itty bitty kilns?


Nah, phasers only work on Klingons, you want a rheostat. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Tom White
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Location: Houston, Texas

Postby Tom White » Sun Oct 05, 2003 10:28 pm

I have mounted a 120 volt bi-metal infinite switch and a regular duplex 120 volt outlet in a deep square electrical box with a 6' cord to plug into the wall outlet. The kiln plugs into the controlled outlet and this allows me to slow the rate of rise somewhat. Paragon sells the equivalent with the switch mounted in a smaller box about 12 to 18" from the outlet end of a heavy duty extension cord. I start the kiln with the switch at the lowest position which provides current to the kiln and place a kiln post on its side under the front edge of the kiln muffle to vent it and slow the rate of heating until the pyrometer indicates 1000 F. I never have to set the switch any hotter than medium, even when I do my mini pot melts in that kiln.

Best wishes,
Tom in Texas

Tim Swann
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Postby Tim Swann » Mon Oct 06, 2003 12:52 am

When I want to slow down the small kiln I have I do it by turning it off and on. It may seem crud but I only need to do this when I am doing a second fusing or batch annealing beads. I have considered putting a rheostat in line with the plug, but have not found it to be necessary yet.

Tim

vidrio
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Postby vidrio » Wed Oct 15, 2003 10:43 am

Brock wrote:
Dani wrote:Can you use a phaser to slow down the ramping on those itty bitty kilns?


Nah, phasers only work on Klingons, you want a rheostat. Brock


Hi Brock,

I'm new to pendent making, new to glass really. I've been playing with temps to try and get the right shapes. If I cut squares they with take on circular shapes at 1550, but they get very fat. 1480 seems to underfire them. Any suggestions. Also, if you have any basic info on what prefired cut shapes become when fired it would help. I've tried a lot of different tests and still don't seem to have any consistent answers. I've also been trying to get holes with fiber paper, with no luck. I'm tring to find some bead release as I understand that works with toothpicks, but do you know anything different?

Thanks Vidrio

Brock
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Postby Brock » Wed Oct 15, 2003 10:54 am

Hi Brock,

I'm new to pendent making, new to glass really. I've been playing with temps to try and get the right shapes. If I cut squares they with take on circular shapes at 1550, but they get very fat. 1480 seems to underfire them. Any suggestions. Also, if you have any basic info on what prefired cut shapes become when fired it would help. I've tried a lot of different tests and still don't seem to have any consistent answers. I've also been trying to get holes with fiber paper, with no luck. I'm tring to find some bead release as I understand that works with toothpicks, but do you know anything different?

Thanks Vidrio

I'm a big fan of LOOKING in the kiln so I know exactly what shape I have achieved. Basically, glass will soften, move, and try to round, so with enough heat, square become circles, rectangles become lozenges, etc. Of course, any of these processes/shapes can be halted at any time by LOOKING in the kiln and stopping it where tyou want. I have zero experience with bead/pendant holes but lots of people here do. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Barbara Muth
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Location: Washington DC Metropolitan Area
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Postby Barbara Muth » Wed Oct 15, 2003 11:51 am

Vidrio, try using fiber paper , or bead release coated steel mandrels for bead holes. Some folks have had less than success with bead release coated toothpicks.

if you are new to glass I strongly recommend that you purchase the "bible" Brad's Warmglass book. When I was learning about glass and just started fusing I worked with a tabletop kiln, a little Paragon Quickfire with a 4 inch shelf. I read Brad's book, read the board, experimented and did a lot of peeking in the kiln. (I heartily agree with Brock - if you want to really control, until you run a lot of tests peeking is the answer, particularly when you do not have a digital controller)

You can order Brad's book from this website, the link is on the top of the page to the right.

Have fun!
barbara
Barbara
Check out the glass manufacturer's recommended firing schedules...
LATEST GLASS

jim simmons
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Postby jim simmons » Wed Oct 15, 2003 7:38 pm

Barbara Muth wrote: When I was learning about glass and just started fusing I worked with a tabletop kiln, a little Paragon Quickfire with a 4 inch shelf.
barbara


You astound me, Barbara. Here I thought that I was the only one left in the world that had one of those little 4" jobs. :wink:

Jim

JoanB
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 6:10 pm

Postby JoanB » Thu Oct 16, 2003 2:18 am

I only make fused glass jewelry. I frequently ramp the kiln at 1500 per hour, with no problems at all, to either the glass or the shelf.
After soaking at the appropriate temp, I crash cool the kiln to about 1050, and simply close the kiln and let it cool to room temp. I've been doing this for over five years, and have never had any problem with any of my pieces.

My first kiln was the Paragon Quik-Fire, but mine came with a 5" X 5" shelf. I did use the Paragon 'temperature controller' (which is actually a rheostat) and got pretty good in getting predictable results.

I now use a Paragon SC-2 which comes with a digital controller. Once you've had the luxury of the digital controller, there's just no going back! It's only a little larger... uses a 7" X 7" shelf, but it works for my needs.

JoanB

Barbara Muth
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Postby Barbara Muth » Thu Oct 16, 2003 7:30 am

jim simmons wrote:
Barbara Muth wrote: When I was learning about glass and just started fusing I worked with a tabletop kiln, a little Paragon Quickfire with a 4 inch shelf.
barbara


You astound me, Barbara. Here I thought that I was the only one left in the world that had one of those little 4" jobs. :wink:

Jim


Jim, I keep thinking I will use it as a test kiln so I don't sell the Marshmallow... But I haven't used it in a year and a half, not since I fired up my Jennie. I did learn a lot from the Marshmallow though, and I do think it is a good way to get your feet wet!

Barbara
Barbara

Check out the glass manufacturer's recommended firing schedules...

LATEST GLASS

Bea
Posts: 23
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 8:53 am
Location: Kangaroo Island, South Australia

Postby Bea » Sun Oct 19, 2003 8:38 am

Joan

"After soaking at the appropriate temp, I crash cool the kiln to about 1050, and simply close the kiln and let it cool to room temp. I've been doing this for over five years, and have never had any problem with any of my pieces."

Do you anneal your beads after this????

My first couple of batches using this schedule had a couple of pendants that cracked after some time....... now I crash cool the kiln to 1000F and then let the kiln take over to bring it down to 965F and soak for 30 - 45 mins and so far those pieces have stood the test of time (only a few months at this stage).

I am using the Sierra PMC kiln.......

Bea
Simply Bea Beads

vidrio
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 7:14 pm

jewelry

Postby vidrio » Mon Oct 20, 2003 8:31 am

Hi, thanks for reply.

A couple more questions.

My kiln will fire at 999 per hour. Once I've got it up to 1500, how long do I need to soak the pieces?

Also, could you give me any advice on attaching findings. I've tried to stay away from adding anything to the glass, not so much as I'm a purist, but more because I'm messy! But, I've had no luck getting holes, or "tunnels in the glass.

Thanks

Vidrio.

JoanB wrote:I only make fused glass jewelry. I frequently ramp the kiln at 1500 per hour, with no problems at all, to either the glass or the shelf.
After soaking at the appropriate temp, I crash cool the kiln to about 1050, and simply close the kiln and let it cool to room temp. I've been doing this for over five years, and have never had any problem with any of my pieces.

My first kiln was the Paragon Quik-Fire, but mine came with a 5" X 5" shelf. I did use the Paragon 'temperature controller' (which is actually a rheostat) and got pretty good in getting predictable results.

I now use a Paragon SC-2 which comes with a digital controller. Once you've had the luxury of the digital controller, there's just no going back! It's only a little larger... uses a 7" X 7" shelf, but it works for my needs.

JoanB

vidrio
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 7:14 pm

pendents and findings

Postby vidrio » Mon Oct 20, 2003 8:37 am

Thanks for advice,

I guess I've been a little nervous about peeking in the kiln. It seems so HOT! Also, I was told it could ruin glass if you don't know what you're doing. But probably that pertains to bigger pieces. So, I'm going to give it a go.

How do you attach your pendents if you don't use holes? Glues and findings?

Vidrio

Brock wrote:Hi Brock,

I'm new to pendent making, new to glass really. I've been playing with temps to try and get the right shapes. If I cut squares they with take on circular shapes at 1550, but they get very fat. 1480 seems to underfire them. Any suggestions. Also, if you have any basic info on what prefired cut shapes become when fired it would help. I've tried a lot of different tests and still don't seem to have any consistent answers. I've also been trying to get holes with fiber paper, with no luck. I'm tring to find some bead release as I understand that works with toothpicks, but do you know anything different?

Thanks Vidrio

I'm a big fan of LOOKING in the kiln so I know exactly what shape I have achieved. Basically, glass will soften, move, and try to round, so with enough heat, square become circles, rectangles become lozenges, etc. Of course, any of these processes/shapes can be halted at any time by LOOKING in the kiln and stopping it where tyou want. I have zero experience with bead/pendant holes but lots of people here do. Brock

Dolores
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Contact:

Postby Dolores » Mon Oct 20, 2003 12:43 pm

Just some possibilities for hanging pendants:
-drill a small hole for a jumpring.
-drill small holes on opposite corners and attach jumprings and chain.
-glue on a pendant bail (lots of sources to be found in the archives!).
-grind a channel all around the glass and wire wrap.
-glue on a PMC backing or cut a custom shape out of sheet metal.

In regards to the pendant channels, be sure to overlap the top layer over the fiber paper enough to allow the glass to sag over (if not, it will retreat back instead). One good trick is to close the opening with a ceramic rod once the glass has softened. I got tired of wasting firings on channels that didn't want to close properly, so I donned a kiln glove and pushed the offending glass down with the ceramic firing rod (Voile! Nice closed channels every time! :D ). Yes, the kiln is at 1400 degrees at this point, but small jewelry pieces are not affected.

DOLORES

Jack Bowman
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Re: jewelry

Postby Jack Bowman » Tue Oct 21, 2003 11:42 pm

[quote="vidrio"]Hi, thanks for reply.

A couple more questions.

My kiln will fire at 999 per hour. Once I've got it up to 1500, how long do I need to soak the pieces?

Also, could you give me any advice on attaching findings. I've tried to stay away from adding anything to the glass, not so much as I'm a purist, but more because I'm messy! But, I've had no luck getting holes, or "tunnels in the glass.

Thanks

Vidrio.

This company sells a great bail. Just glue on with E6000

http://www.stainedglasswarehouse.com/jewelrybails.html

Jack


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