What is in shelf paper? - WarmGlass.com

What is in shelf paper?

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BadExampleMan
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What is in shelf paper?

Postby BadExampleMan » Sat Jun 22, 2013 2:06 am

The reason I ask is that since I got my kiln and started doing 4-5 firings a week I'm getting this really annoying eczema on my fingers. The timing might be just coincidence, but I'm wondering if it's from handling shelf paper, especially post-firing when it's really friable and just sort of disintegrates. Is there some sort of mineral microfibers in there that might be irritating the skin?

Thanks.

Greg Rawls
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Greg Rawls » Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:19 am

I discuss the health aspects of Thin Fire paper on my web site:

http://www.gregorieglass.com/Health_Safety_Chemical.html
Greg

Bert Weiss
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Bert Weiss » Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:31 am

Alumina hydrate is the primary active ingredient in anti-perspirant deodorant. It really dries your skin. When I handle it, there are 2 effects on me. First, I am less likely to fingerprint the glass I handle. Second, when I leave the studio, I use a moisturizer on my hands.

I highly regard Greg's website. He is both a practicing glass artist and an industrial hygienist. We are lucky to have him in this community.
Bert

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Kevin Midgley
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Kevin Midgley » Sat Jun 22, 2013 10:09 am

use kilnwash.

Bert Weiss
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Bert Weiss » Sat Jun 22, 2013 10:36 am

Kevin Midgley wrote:use kilnwash.
According to Greg's site, the primary ingredient in thinfire and kilnwash are the same. The main difference is in the binders.
Bert



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Brock
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Brock » Sat Jun 22, 2013 10:51 am

Then it must be the binder burning off that irritates my throat.

Morganica
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Morganica » Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:10 pm

Binder burnoff doesn't do much for me, either--I don't want to close the lid until the vapor is gone because then it stays with the glass and becomes a devit problem. So I vent the room and stay out of it during burnoff.

An irritant probably will not kill you but it sure can make you miserable, especially if you are very sensitive to it. Fired fiberpaper residue feels like a slightly softer version of fiberglass insulation or peach fuzz to me. Thinfire is supposed to just be a nuisance dust, but it still drives me nuts if I get it on me. So I wear gloves when handling it, and mist it with water to keep it from flying all over the place. And wear a particulate mask.
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Greg Rawls
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Greg Rawls » Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:42 am

The trick to avoiding the irritating effects of Thin Fire binder burn off during firing is arranging to be somewhere else when it occurs!
Greg

JestersBaubles
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby JestersBaubles » Sun Jun 23, 2013 9:09 am

I've started using Papyros instead of Thin Fire. It holds together better after firing. The Spectrum web site recommends using a spatula to fold it, scoop it, and deposit it in the trash. That method works well. Even though Papyros is supposedly reusable, I'm never doing the same size pieces and typically I do a load of fusing, load of slumping, load of fusing... so for me it's a once-time use.

I don't like the feeling of the stuff on my hands either. About as bad a chalk dust :mrgreen: .

Dana W.

Peter Angel
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Peter Angel » Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:19 pm

I suspect sugar is a component. I recognize the smell of burning sugar.
Peter Angel
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S.TImmerman
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby S.TImmerman » Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:28 pm

Peter Angel wrote:I suspect sugar is a component. I recognize the smell of burning sugar.



I agree, when I broil crème brûlée, the smell is very similar.

twin vision glass
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby twin vision glass » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:40 am

Someone told me once it was Potato Starch. :-k

Dick
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby Dick » Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:37 pm

kiln wash, kiln wash, kiln wash. I am always surprised by the number of people who always use fiber instead of kiln wash. I agree there are times you almost have to, but most of the time you don't. With kiln wash the surface is better, less other problems such as devit, less expense, and less toxic waste

CMWarren
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Re: What is in shelf paper?

Postby CMWarren » Mon Jul 08, 2013 2:36 pm

I use thin fire because it produces a less noticable texture, and sometimes, I want it as smooth as possible.

I also use thin fire becuase it allows me to cast pyramids in stainless steel molds. just create a hexagon, fold into a pyramid, slip in the mold, and tada, you just fill it with glass, and go.

I only use kiln wash for my slumping molds, and extra protction for my kiln shelf and dams if I am doing casting.


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