respirator # N95 - WarmGlass.com

respirator # N95

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Valerie
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 7:01 pm
Location: Kentwood Michigan

respirator # N95

Postby Valerie » Tue Mar 23, 2004 10:51 pm

I have some resiprators from work.
The guys wear them that scale the
ingrediants and load the mixers
Niosh N95
Some of the stuff these guys scale up
is pretty icky .....will these work for
blasting in a cabinet?

Amy Schleif-Mohr
Posts: 280
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 5:18 pm
Location: Milwaukee

Postby Amy Schleif-Mohr » Tue Mar 23, 2004 11:02 pm

I've always gone for the NIOSH P100's I spoke on the phone with a tech support person at Lab Safety and that's what they would recommend to use. You want something that will filter particles similar to asbestos (sp?).

Amy

Greg Rawls
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:11 pm
Location: Charleston, SC
Contact:

Postby Greg Rawls » Wed Mar 24, 2004 8:39 pm

N95 is prefectly adequate for sandblasting. We did a study on N95 vs P100 for exposure to a carcinogen at work and found the N95 to be more than adequate. Actually, you can use a filtering facepiece - that's a disposable respirator for dust.

The difference between P100 and N95 all goes to how NIOSH tests respirators. Check my web site for more information on respirators.

Greg the Certified Industrial Hygienist

http://www.gregorieglass.com
Greg

Valerie
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 7:01 pm
Location: Kentwood Michigan

Postby Valerie » Wed Mar 24, 2004 8:56 pm

I wondered, because the ingrediants used in industrial baking are pretty fierce not to mention fine. These have a little plastic intake / outtake valve on them. White lung being a common ailment in baking, I had hoped these were up to the task. I had hoped if not for blasting, then preparing shelves and cutting fiberboard. I apreciate all feedback...specially when my health is involved. And the new cabinet should not leak quick so badly...
one would hope.

Greg Rawls
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:11 pm
Location: Charleston, SC
Contact:

Postby Greg Rawls » Thu Mar 25, 2004 8:30 pm

What is the grit you are using? I'm assuming you are using aluminum oxide or silicon carbide. NEVER use sand or any grit that contains SILICA in a sandblaster unless you have an excellent dust collection system, the cabinet does not leak and you are wearing a P100 fullface respirator!!! (Did is scare you enough? Silica is serious stuff!).
Greg

Valerie
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 7:01 pm
Location: Kentwood Michigan

just say no to silica

Postby Valerie » Fri Mar 26, 2004 12:04 am

I am using 100 grit aluminum oxide.
my new cabinet will have a vacuum.

Greg Rawls
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:11 pm
Location: Charleston, SC
Contact:

Postby Greg Rawls » Fri Mar 26, 2004 9:11 am

ALuminum Oxide is nuisance dust - not a big concern. Blast away but keep an eye on fugative emissions (aka - leaks).
Greg


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