Share Painting Photos? - WarmGlass.com

Share Painting Photos?

Want to share a photo of your work? Or get feedback on a new piece? Post it here. (Note: items in this forum are deleted periodically, generally after several months.)

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StaceyG
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Share Painting Photos?

Postby StaceyG » Mon Mar 29, 2004 4:35 pm

Hi,
I am a painter and wanted to try painting fused glass. Would anyone share their photos so I can begin to see what is possible with paint (not frit ).

Any ideas/suggestions are welcome as well.

thanks,
Stacey

Dani
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Postby Dani » Mon Mar 29, 2004 6:25 pm

Brad will be putting some of my painted images in the gallery soon, including a set of church windows. Stay tuned. And if you check out some stained glass history books at the library, you'll get a pretty solid grasp of what can be done with the Reusches. (Not that the Elskus book is lacking in any way, mind you.) Go to Whitehouse Books at the link above for some idea of the glass books available new and used.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Mon Mar 29, 2004 7:13 pm

Image
This is a glass painting 64" x 32" by Amy Laskin. It was done in one firing to 1480ºF, with Ferro Sunshine series enamels and medium #1544. We did tests for 2 days and then took another 4 or 5 days to make the painting. The window is installed in an interior doorway at the Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation, Bethlehem NH. The view is the western view of Mt Washington from Bretton Woods. I drive past this site, at this season, on my way to High Holiday services each fall.

PS I know there is a hebrew error, wrong mem.

I'll post some student paintings next.
Bert

Bert Weiss Art Glass*
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lohman
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Postby lohman » Mon Mar 29, 2004 10:16 pm


Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Mar 30, 2004 10:03 am



I find this work very irritating. I'm not sure exactly why. It is competent, but there us something about the design and execution that does not "rise above the medium"

Stained glass is to me the most difficult medium to design well. Most designers fail to move me with their work. It has to do with the contrived necessity of leadlines and color changes. One designer in a thousand can transcend this constraint and make their windows sing.

I offer the work of Joep Nicholas, Albinus Elskus, and Marc Chagall as works that make this ascension for me. Reluctantly I'll add Ludwig Shafrath. I don't really love his work, but it does rise above the constraints of the leadline. There are others, but I haven't looked at those books recently enough to pull up the names.

I am pleased with the medium of fused glass as I think it is much easier to design effective work without the leadline.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

lohman
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Postby lohman » Tue Mar 30, 2004 10:24 am

I hear you Bert.
Note that I made no comments and was merely showing StaceyG some enameled glass.
I will say now that yes, he is competent and seems to sell alot of work and McDonald sell alot of burgers.

Brock
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Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:27 am

Bert Weiss wrote:


I find this work very irritating. I'm not sure exactly why. It is competent, but there us something about the design and execution that does not "rise above the medium"

Stained glass is to me the most difficult medium to design well. Most designers fail to move me with their work. It has to do with the contrived necessity of leadlines and color changes. One designer in a thousand can transcend this constraint and make their windows sing.

I offer the work of Joep Nicholas, Albinus Elskus, and Marc Chagall as works that make this ascension for me. Reluctantly I'll add Ludwig Shafrath. I don't really love his work, but it does rise above the constraints of the leadline. There are others, but I haven't looked at those books recently enough to pull up the names.

I am pleased with the medium of fused glass as I think it is much easier to design effective work without the leadline.


You must include Patrick Reyntiens, and how about Peter McGrain? I totally disagree about Leap, but that's why they have horse races.

I think he, and McGrain are pushing a stale, formulaic art form into the present. Really, how many dour saints, casting there doleful eyes heavenward, do we really need? Most liturgic glass is incredibly similar, and incredibly boring. Leap and McGrain are doing something fresh with the medium. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Dani
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Postby Dani » Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:54 am

Bert Weiss wrote:


I find this work very irritating. I'm not sure exactly why. It is competent, but there us something about the design and execution that does not "rise above the medium"

Stained glass is to me the most difficult medium to design well. Most designers fail to move me with their work. It has to do with the contrived necessity of leadlines and color changes. One designer in a thousand can transcend this constraint and make their windows sing.

I offer the work of Joep Nicholas, Albinus Elskus, and Marc Chagall as works that make this ascension for me. Reluctantly I'll add Ludwig Shafrath. I don't really love his work, but it does rise above the constraints of the leadline. There are others, but I haven't looked at those books recently enough to pull up the names.

I am pleased with the medium of fused glass as I think it is much easier to design effective work without the leadline.


I'm inclined to agree.... it's a tad too fussy I think. But, I'm not a great fan of Chagall's work either for completely different reasons that have nothing to do with anal attachment to technique (did I just say that?) By the way, it's my understanding that Chagall just designed the church windows that bear his name, but didn't actually paint them or fabricate. Not an unusual thing and many well-known painters did try their hands at stained glass design. In many cases, unfortunately..... IMPO. :wink:

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:24 pm

Dani wrote:
Bert Weiss wrote:I'm inclined to agree.... it's a tad too fussy I think. But, I'm not a great fan of Chagall's work either for completely different reasons that have nothing to do with anal attachment to technique (did I just say that?) By the way, it's my understanding that Chagall just designed the church windows that bear his name, but didn't actually paint them or fabricate. Not an unusual thing and many well-known painters did try their hands at stained glass design. In many cases, unfortunately..... IMPO. :wink:


The Chagall windows were made by Charles and Brigitte Marc, in France. They were basically interpretations of paintings. I was in a church in Zurich that was the most impressive architectural space, modified by art glass, that I have experienced.

There are some interesting Matisse windows somewhere in France. I'm not sure who made them. I believe there is a Picasso in the apartment building attached to the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

I was surprised to have all the postings after my statement be supportive, I thought I'd spark controversy. I guess cutting oil is a more volatile issue than stained glass design LOL
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

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Brock
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Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:26 pm

I was surprised to have all the postings after my statement be supportive, I thought I'd spark controversy. I guess cutting oil is a more volatile issue than stained glass design LOL

Um Bert . . . check mine. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Don Burt
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Postby Don Burt » Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:44 pm

I remember an old article by Dick Weiss that chided just about every style of stained glass as not being innovative enough. I thought he was full of crap. Its an anachronistic medium. Its OK to look traditional. Leap's not doing anything artistically that wasn't done already in Victorian times, but its OK by me. He may be doing some technical things that are nifty, I don't know. Bert cites the greatest of the 20th century as examples; I don't see Leaps work in that category, but I still like it.

What I'd really like to know is why I never get that pink elephant pop-up window that gives me the discount on internet orders. I visit here several times a day and I never get the 'liitle pink guy'. Whats up with that?

Brock
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Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:49 pm

Don Burt wrote:I remember an old article by Dick Weiss that chided just about every style of stained glass as not being innovative enough. I thought he was full of crap. Its an anachronistic medium. Its OK to look traditional. Leap's not doing anything artistically that wasn't done already in Victorian times, but its OK by me. He may be doing some technical things that are nifty, I don't know. Bert cites the greatest of the 20th century as examples; I don't see Leaps work in that category, but I still like it.

What I'd really like to know is why I never get that pink elephant pop-up window that gives me the discount on internet orders. I visit here several times a day and I never get the 'liitle pink guy'. Whats up with that?


Wrong board Don, I think you're looking for a Green Monster.

And again, any list of traditional stained glass painters/masters that does not include Reyntiens, is, in my opinion, incomplete. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Don Burt
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Postby Don Burt » Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:54 pm

Brock wrote:Wrong board Don, I think you're looking for a Green Monster.

And again, any list of traditional stained glass painters/masters that does not include Reyntiens, is, in my opinion, incomplete. Brock


Oh yeah. Sorry.

Benoit Gilsoul rocks. so do Margaret Agnes Rope, and my main man Harry Clarke.

Bert Weiss
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Postby Bert Weiss » Tue Mar 30, 2004 1:12 pm

Reyntiens is good. I seem to have lost my copy of his book. Wasn't his strongest painting work a collaboration with a different artist?

I like Peter McGrain a lot.

Meisterman was cool.

Nicholas rules for me. That man could make figure work resonate with emotion. His colors are fabulous and he put heavy leadlines diagonally through faces. The rythm of his lead lines is the best.

Dick Millard apprenticed at Rambusch when Nicholas worked there. he has some great stories. Not the least of which is when Mr Rambusch fired him, and destroyed a completed but uninstalled church commission, complaining that he was insane. I bet that was some awesome work.
Bert



Bert Weiss Art Glass*

http://www.customartglass.com

Furniture Lighting Sculpture Tableware

Architectural Commissions

Brock
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Postby Brock » Tue Mar 30, 2004 1:19 pm

Reyntiens is good. I seem to have lost my copy of his book. Wasn't his strongest painting work a collaboration with a different artist?

He's worked with others. He's also done cathedrals on his own. Brock
My memory is so good, I can't remember the last time I forgot something . . .

Dani
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Postby Dani » Tue Mar 30, 2004 3:17 pm

Don Burt wrote:[quote="Brock]
Wrong board Don, I think you're looking for a Green Monster.

And again, any list of traditional stained glass painters/masters that does not include Reyntiens, is, in my opinion, incomplete. Brock


Oh yeah. Sorry.

Benoit Gilsoul rocks. so do Margaret Agnes Rope, and my main man Harry Clarke.[/quote]

Do you have the Harry Clarke book/exhibition catalog? I love his church windows (and as I'm doing eastern orthodox icon research, marvel at all the "Harry Clark hands", or I should say Clark's style was very iconographic), but some of his book illustration is very bizarre, even troubling.... no, let me rephrase that, it was gross and weird! :shock:

StaceyG
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Postby StaceyG » Tue Mar 30, 2004 5:20 pm

thanks for the photos/links. I was interested in a more organic free form type of painting on glass, not a traditional stained glass look. Any photos/suggetions for that style?

thanks!

Rebecca M.
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Postby Rebecca M. » Tue Mar 30, 2004 5:46 pm

Dani wrote:
Do you have the Harry Clarke book/exhibition catalog? I love his church windows (and as I'm doing eastern orthodox icon research, marvel at all the "Harry Clark hands", or I should say Clark's style was very iconographic), but some of his book illustration is very bizarre, even troubling.... no, let me rephrase that, it was gross and weird! :shock:


Gross and weird maybe, but so perfect for Poe. You ever see the illustration for 'The Man of the Crowd'? Yuckola. But still in there are those lovely hands, and those Harry Clarke eyes. Well, on the people who still have their heads and hands attached anyway. :twisted:
I got a very old copy (for a song) of 'Tales of Mystery and Imagination' just for the plates. Very inspiring illustrations.

This site has so many links for SG windows, painted and some untraditional, that Stacy might want to check it out. http://www.ariadne.org/studio/michelli/sgdefault.html

lohman
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Postby lohman » Tue Mar 30, 2004 6:02 pm

[StaceyG says ] I am a painter and wanted to try painting fused glass. Would anyone share their photos so I can begin to see what is possible with paint (not frit ).


Offering examples of stained glass artists, I think, leads to a discussion of a specific artist's style. As a painter you might already have an image in your mind in your style that you want to explore. Maybe what you want to ask for is discussion of glass studio techniques which will enable you to realize your vision by fusing and painting enamels on glass.

Cynthia

Re: Share Painting Photos?

Postby Cynthia » Tue Mar 30, 2004 9:16 pm

StaceyG wrote:Hi,
I am a painter and wanted to try painting fused glass. Would anyone share their photos so I can begin to see what is possible with paint (not frit ).

Any ideas/suggestions are welcome as well.

thanks,
Stacey


Image

Paradise Paint on float. Not a great painting, it was done on the fly in a class (my first exposure to the PP's), but it should give you an idea of how painterly you work with these paints.

Not liturgical, stained glass or tole painting...and it has a lot of problems with the light and figure blah blah blah...but the paint itself is divine.

Is this the kind of work you want to see?


Maybe Jackie will post her painting she did with Paradise Paints. It was very painterly...and a good painting taboot.


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