Spring panel

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Don Burt
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Spring panel

Post by Don Burt »

Fused BE colors on Tekta, silver stain and enamels. Panels for the other seasons are planned. Hence the odd hanging alignment to the left of the picture window.
IMG_5433.JPG
Don Burt
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:45 pm
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Re: Spring panel

Post by Don Burt »

Not sure why the embedded photo is 90 degrees rotated. When I click the image it rights itself.
Buttercup
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Re: Spring panel

Post by Buttercup »

Very cheerful. Thanks for sharing, Don.
Havi
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Re: Spring panel

Post by Havi »

Nice!

I like it


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cemoore
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Re: Spring panel

Post by cemoore »

Hi Don,

So glad I found this silver stain example of yours, beautiful! Only a couple of years late!

I have in my stash of very old Reusche paints some Amber Stain (H465) (Reusche item D292465). I've got about 7 ounces and I'm certain this package is 20 years old! I'm assuming there's no reason it could have spoiled. I have screenprinted Best Black and fired on the non-tin side of a piece of float. I'd like to use the Amber Stain on the backside of the piece (tin side) and fire at the recommended firing temp between 1050-1080 per the package. I'm not recalling all the details from my stain use experience years ago, but the Elskus book is saying its best to fire stain up on a bed of whiting. Elskus discourages what I've seen on this board about firing stain down on whiting along with enamels on topside - to the enamel maturation temps. I normally don't use whiting, but simply use a kilnwashed shelf or a non-washed low fire bisqueware tile and would like to do the same here. I'm thinking as my black enamel matures at higher temps beginning at around 1140, I should be ok to just put the enamel side down on the shelf or tile and stay on the lower side of the firing range of the stain, say 1050-1060. I can do whiting if absolutely necessary, but would rather not. I saw some discussions here about staining other than your piece or having the silver stain in the kiln come back and bite me later - should I be concerned with that if I'm firing the stain up? I'm not concerned about losing the glass piece as I'm testing, but I'm very protective of my kiln.

ANY words of wisdom on my plans would be greatly appreciated.

Cathy
Don Burt
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Re: Spring panel

Post by Don Burt »

Your plan sounds fine. Best Black side down on kilnwash. Silver stain side up. Fire to low end of silver stain maturation
cemoore
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Re: Spring panel

Post by cemoore »

Thanks Don!

I've tried a piece now and results pretty good even going to 1075. I was also wondering what would happen to a previously stained piece if it goes back up say in a subsequent firing of Series 5 paint?...so 1275-1300 ish? I'm about to test where I would fire silver stain in first firing, then Best Black in second firing (with paint over stain on same top side of glass), then finish the piece by sandblasting the back. (1) Will the silver stain disappear if it goes too high on second firing? I understand that subsequent firings (and even longer firings) can deepen intensity - but are there temp limits where previously fired stain disappears? (2) re the interaction of stain and paint causing discoloration of the paint: if paint is on top of the silver stain, would the discoloration still occur, or be lessened to such a degree that its not apparent?

Many thanks, Cathy
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